Premiere Pro Shortcut: Switching Between Panels in the Editing Interface

first_img SHIFT and 3 = Timeline SHIFT and 4 = Program Monitor  SHIFT and 5 = Effects Controls SHIFT and 6 = Audio Mixer  SHIFT and 7 = Effects SHIFT and 8 = Media Browser Activate Premiere Pro panels in rotation to the right:Hold down CTRL and SHIFT and tap the period key.Activate Premiere Pro panels in rotation to the left:Hold down CTRL and SHIFT and tap the comma key.A gold line appears around a panel when it’s selected:Interested in learning more Adobe Premiere Pro shortcuts?Check out our previous post showing you how to customize your own.center_img Save time in post by quickly navigating the Premiere Pro interface with a set of keyboard shortcuts.If you’re already a Premiere Pro shortcut user, you can give your edits an additional speed boost by learning the shortcuts for switching between the panels.  Sure, you can use your mouse and click the panels to select them, but reaching for your mouse will slow you down.Either use one of the following shortcuts to select an exact panel or cycle through the each of the panels in the Premiere Pro user interface.   Shortcuts increase your editing efficiency – use them!  SHIFT and 1 = Project Panel SHIFT and 2 = Source Monitorlast_img read more

Time Remapping In Adobe Premiere Pro

first_imgFreeze motion and vary speed overtime by using the handy time remapping feature in Adobe Premiere.Use time mapping in Adobe Premiere Pro to create cool speed changes in footage. From slo-mo to super speed, time shifts will add visual interest to your edits!In this Adobe Premiere Pro tutorial you will learn:Creating time remap keyframesChanging speeds and smoothing the speed transitionCreating a freeze frame and time reverseCreating Time Remapping Keyframes in the TimelineTo start time remapping your footage, in the timeline click on the word opacity for the clip you want to speed change.  Then, select Time Remapping > Speed from the pulldown menu.Add keyframes where you want a speed change by holding Command (Mac) or Control (Win) and clicking on the yellow line. This creates speed segments.Changing Speeds and smoothing the speed transition in Premiere ProHold Shift and drag down the yellow line (rubber band)to change in increments of 5%. (I changed mine to 50%). 2 “gotchas” to be aware of:Time remapping doesn’t effect the audio (it stays normal speed)If an another clip immediately follows this one it will trim the time remapped clip.Adobe recommends time remapping a clip without another clip immediately following it for this reason.Once you’ve added your time remapping keyframes, click and drag on a speed keyframe to smooth the speed transition.Creating a Freeze Frame and Time Reverse in Premiere ProTo create a freeze frame segment, hold Command (Mac) or Control (Win)  and  Option/Alt while dragging a keyframe.To create a time reversed segment, hold Command (Mac) or Control (PC) and drag a keyframe.Use Adobe Premiere Pro’s time remapping tools to give your footage an edgy stylized look!Was this tutorial helpful for you?  Do you have other tricks for applying slo-mo in your video edits?We want to hear from you in the comments!last_img read more

6 Things You May Have Missed in the News

first_imgNew cameras, lenses, software, and record breaking box office numbers. Here are the latest and greatest articles from the past few weeks.We’ve seen plenty of headlines since our last news roundup. Check out this list of industry news you may have missed.1. Rokinon Announces XEEN, a New Line of Cinema Prime LensesImage via nofilmschool.comSamyang/Rokinon have announced XEEN cinema prime lenses. It’s rumored that they will offer Canon EF mount, Nikon F, Sony E, Micro Four Thirds, and PL mounts. Check out more details about these new lenses over at No Film School. You can also try to decipher the new homepage for the lenses at xeenglobal.com.2. Panasonic GX8Panasonic’s latest mirrorless camera is the new GX8. The camera shoots 4K and apparently offers some revolutionary stabilization. The classic style body boasts a 20.3 megapixel sensor, making it the first micro four thirds camera to surpass 16 megapixels. The camera will set you back $1200. See more over at Gizmodo. 5. Universal Pictures Already Has the Highest Grossing Year Ever for a StudioUniversal Pictures has already grossed $5.53 Billion in 2015, and it’s only August. That breaks 20th Century Fox’s $5.52 Billion record for the entire 2014 year. Jurassic World had the biggest global opening of all time, following the studios box office domination for Furious 7. Minions had the second biggest opening weekend for a animated film, while 50 Shades of Grey and Pitch Perfect 2 rounded out the highest-grossing films. All this and the studio is about to release the anticipated N.W.A. biopic Straight Outta Compton. Check out more at Entertainment Weekly.6. DJI Releases the Phantom 3 StandardAfter the release of the Phantom 3 Professional and Phantom 3 Advanced, DJI released a new camera for this beginner edition of their famous entry-level quadcopter. The Phantom 3 Standard comes with a camera that shoots 2.7K video at 30fps and 12 megapixels photos in RAW or JPG.The camera settings and controls will and run through the updated DJI Go app. A single charged battery averages 25 minutes of flight time. The Phantom 3 Standard starts at $799. This version is $200 cheaper than the Phantom 3 Advanced, and honestly feels like an unnecessary addition to the Phantom series. 4. DaVinci Resolve 12 Beta Release & TutorialWe previously mentioned the release of the DaVinci Resolve 12 Beta. As users begin checking out the changes, we are starting to get a taste of the improvements in this color grading software.Casey Faris, from Ground Control Color, sent us this awesome in-depth tutorial. Not only does it show off some of the new features, but it’s also a great intro to DaVinci Resolve for newcomers. 3. Canon C300 Mark IIWhen Canon first announced the ME20F-SH, we questioned the need for a 4 million+ ISO camera. Now they’ve finally released some updated info on the highly anticipated C300 Mark II. Canon’s Jon Sagud met up with Zacuto for a great look at the new features. When released, the body alone will cost you $15,999. That price point may be enough to make people jump from Canon to another brand. Discover any new gear you need to buy? Was this news roundup helpful? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Grips, Gaffers, and Best Boys: The Grip and Electric Departments

first_imgTo achieve the best looking shot, a cinematographer not only relies on the camera department, but also the lighting technicians, electricians, and grips. But what do they all do on set?A Director of Photography is usually associated with the camera department, but the DP actually oversees the Electrical Department and Grips as well. Before the days of unions, there was not a differentiating line between members of these departments. As job titles have become more solidified, so have the departments.You may also hear the term Lighting Department, but it’s not accurate. Most of the time you will hear Grips and Electric called G&E. Here is a breakdown of the G&E Departments.The Electrical DepartmentThis department is in charge of all electrical needs on set. That covers everything from powering set lights to powering the coffee machine.GafferImage via FM Grip and LightingA gaffer is the head of the electrical department. They may also be referred to as the Chief Lighting Technician. The gaffer is responsible for designing and executing the lighting plan. They work directly with the Director of Photography to achieve the desired look. They will provide the power needed for for the lights, and work with the Key Grip to shape the light.Best BoyThe Best Boy in the Electric department is the head assistant to the gaffer. They are the second in charge, typically watching over the electric truck and rentals, while managing and scheduling the rest of the electricians and lighting technicians. Where the Gaffer remains on set with the Director of Photography, the Best Boy carries out and manages all other jobs in the Electrical Department.They may also be referred to as Best Boy Electric or Assistant Chief Lighting Technician. Before the different departments were established, the Gaffer would ask the Key Grip to borrow his “best boy” to assist in the electric department. It became a common term in both departments, which is why there are two different Best Boys. If a female holds this position, she is still referred to as the Best Boy.Electrical Lighting TechnicianImage via ShutterstockThey are responsible for getting power to the set. They are also called; ELT, Electrician, Set Lighting Technicians, Lamp Operator, Electric, Spark or Juicer. They not only get power to the lights, but also everywhere on set. This includes trailers, catering, offices, and more.Generator OperatorFor location shoots, films will use generators for power. Generators, commonly called a Genny, produce electricity from diesel fuel. The person in charge of a generator is called the Genny Operator.Lighting Board OperatorDepending on the size of the set, or the amount of lights, there may be a Lighting Board Operator. These are not common on small sets with a few fixed lights. They are really only used if the scene being shot requires dimmable lights. All the set lights will be run to a control panel that this person will use to adjust and dim the lights. This position is more common on television sets, especially those with a live studio audience.The Grip DepartmentThis department supports all non-electrical components on set. They set up any gear for the camera, like tripods or cranes.Key GripImage: Key Grip Robert Adams on set of Wild Safari via Fernbank Museum of Natural HistoryThe Key Grip, also called a Key for short, is the chief of the grip department. They work with the Director of Photography to achieve the correct lighting and blocking for shots. They diffuse and cut light on set. They are also in charge of the physical camera movement, covering everything from a dolly, to cranes, to vehicle mounts.Best BoyThe chief assistant to the Key Grip. Also knows as the Best Boy Grip. Just like the Best Boy Electric, they are in charge of the organizing and maintaining the grip truck and all other grips working on the project.GripImage via ShutterstockGrips are specialized as camera and lighting rigging technicians.  They work with the non-electrical components of light and camera setups. This includes setting up tripods, cranes, flagging, overheads, and bounces. They make any adjustments and perform maintenance on production equipments. They will cover all duties from camera movement, focusing lights, and any mechanical rigging like dolly tracks.Dolly GripImage via What If MovieThis grip is specifically in charge of working with the camera dolly. They lay and level the dolly track on set.  They will also push and pull the dolly during filming.Do you now know the difference between a Best Boy and a Best Boy? Want more articles like this? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Six Technologies Poised to Change the Future of Film

first_imgWhat does the future hold for filmmaking? These six new technologies may change things in ways you haven’t imagined.Top image via LytroIn 1885 two French brothers invented the first moving picture machine and filmed a train arriving at a station and everyone lost their minds. Since then, the medium has evolved; film has added color and sound and become digital and three-dimensional. We’ve seen the likes of D. W. Griffith, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Keanu Reeves, and Steven Spielberg all work to redefine what we consider to be movies, film, cinema and good.Now it’s 2016 and we’re over a hundred years removed from The Great Train Robbery. Screens are getting smaller and smarter, while films are getting bigger and more diverse and easier to consume than ever before. At the current rate, what we perceive as films will change much more drastically in the next hundred years than the last. Here are six emerging filmmaking technologies that just might be the instruments of that change.1. Light Field TechnologyImage via LytroCameras are progressing at a rate that can only be described as “whoa” and are even beginning to break the rules of image capture. A new camera by Lytro, the ILLUM, is the world’s first commercially available “light field camera.” What does it do?Well, basically when you take a picture with the ILLUM, you capture all of the image with all of the available information. Not just the parts in focus. Not just the light you see. All of it. Everything. Which essentially lets you decide in post what you want your aperture and focus to be.You can read more about the science here and explore the company’s other high-tech endeavors here.2. Flat LensesImage via Harvard SEASA team of Harvard researchers are working to patent a new type of optical lens that is flat rather than curved. Why you ask? Because a flat, ultra-thin lens can theoretically offer complete accuracy over a wider range of wavelengths and reduce chromatic aberrations usually associated with curved-lens capture. The new technology would certainly re-image how we create and package cameras — possibly resulting in doing away with any connotations of what a “camera” does and looks like.3. iPhone 7 Dual-Lens CameraWhile, the iPhone 7 won’t be the first phone camera to use dual lenses — it’ll probably be the best. Apple’s purchase of LinX Imaging gives the company the technology to give their phones SLR-quality image capturing capabilities, along with the always included fun gimmicks and features. There have already been some celebrated feature films shot on iPhones in the past, so it may not be too long before it becomes less of a gimmick and more of a trend.4. Canon PatentsImage via CanonAs we posted about earlier this month, there have been some hints and patent leaks that point to some major Canon announcements by the end of the summer. Highlights include a new Canon 5D, a camera which has routinely shaken up the world of digital video and photography over the last decade. And a possible Canon C700 to compete with the ARRI AMIRA. Regardless of your feelings about the brand, the breakthroughs seem to be speeding up as pixel counts sky rocket and the high-end bottoms out toward better cameras in the hands of more and more people.5. Computerized Sound DesignImage via MIT CSAILFrom this Washington Post article, MIT researchers have developed a computer system that can analyze silent video and add in realistic sound. While this is a work in progress based on the findings in the report, the notion of computerized algorithms sound designing an entire film could open up a whole world of possibilities for other elements of production.6. AI-written ScreenplaysWhich leads into this eerie and odd look into how a computer’s “mind” works.  New York University AI researcher Ross Goodwin teamed up with director Oscar Sharp to create Benjamin: a self-named recurrent neural network that penned its own screenplay after being fed dozens of science fiction movies as source material.You can watch the finished product (starring Silicon Valley’s Thomas Middleditch) awkwardly unfold above. (Thankfully, it doesn’t appear Benjamin is on the fast-track to taking over Hollywood anytime soon.)There’s no real way to tell what the future holds in store. If the last century has served as any indication (the jump from Buster Keaton silent comedies to fully rendered interspecies adventures), there really aren’t any good ways to predict what will ever be next. As long as artists keep creating stories and audiences keep watching, it’s really just up to us to enjoy the ride. Have any other imaginations on the future of film? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Easily Create Captions in Adobe Premiere Pro

first_imgStep 1: Create a New Caption FileClick the New Item button at the bottom of the Project Panel and select Captions. The new caption file will be a video file, and the settings will match with the current sequence you have open. You can manually adjust width and height, frame rate, and pixel aspect ratio before creating your new caption file.You have four choices of captions, including three options for closed captions. For the purpose of this tutorial, we’ll create a CEA-708 closed caption file. Be sure to Enable the Closed Captions Display in the Program Monitor and select the correct caption type. Drag the Caption video file onto the timeline.Step 2: Adding, Timing, and Formatting Your CaptionsSelect the Caption file and use the Caption Panel to add text, time, or to format your text. If you can’t see the Caption Panel, simply go to the window menu, and select Captions. Click the Plus button to add a new text box. Make sure your In and Out points match up with the spoken word.You can view the captions in the timeline by expanding the video track. You have a few formatting options, including the type of caption (pop-on, paint-on, 2-4 roll-up lines) and some simple positioning options. With open captions, you have a few extra options, such as additional fonts and size adjustments.Step 3: ExportIn the Export Settings dialog box, use the Caption tab to export the captions as Burn-in or as a Sidecar file. A Burn-in will naturally “burn” the captions into the video file, and viewers will not have the option to turn them off. When you export as a Sidecar file, you will be provided with an additional .scc file which you can upload or deliver with your video files.For more helpful walk-throughs and video tutorials, head on over to PremiumBeats YouTube channel! Creating captions can be a tedious process — but with Adobe Premiere Pro, you can easily create both open and closed captions, all from within the program.Top image via ShutterstockCaptions are simply text over video. You can create closed or open captions, the main difference being that viewers can turn off closed captions, while open captions are always on screen. Whichever option you go with, captions are always a good idea.Adobe’s latest update adds the ability to easily create open captions from within Premiere. Let’s take a look at how to add captions in Adobe Premiere Pro with a few simple steps. Watch the video tutorial directly below and then follow the step-by-step directions to add the technique to your skill set.last_img read more

Interview: The First Filmmakers to Shoot with the Canon C200

first_imgGet insights from the director and DP behind Canon’s From Dock to Dish.Images via Canon Pro.When the Canon C200 was first announced, the camera manufacturer released the short documentary, From Dock to Dish. We had the chance to interview Director Andrew Fried and Director of Photography Bryant Fisher to discuss their experience shooting and working with the Canon C200. Here’s what we learned.PB: Andrew Fried, From Dock to Dish is a beautiful film. Why did you gravitate toward this concept to highlight the new features of the Canon C200?Andrew: Over the last few years, I have had the distinct privilege to spend time filming in some of the best restaurants in the world. I’ve been consumed lately with the idea that so many people come to these restaurants, enjoy such a special experience and loft such high praise about the food that they’ve eaten, but rarely look past their plate to truly consider all of the people that have played a role in bringing this food to their table. That was the seed of the idea here: to see the entire process and everyone who is truly involved from start to finish.PB: Bryant Fisher, the concept behind “From Dock to Dish” features a lot of different lighting scenarios. What was it like to know you’d be testing and challenging this new camera in a variety of scenarios?Bryant: This was an exciting challenge to me. I’ve used Canon cameras in the past and know they hold up in well in all kinds of scenarios. I wanted to see what Canon packed into this new camera to handle those kinds of scenarios even better. The C200 gave us a very rich image with hardly any help in front of the lens. It felt very consistent and natural with its color and exposure handling.PB: The Cinema RAW Light is an exciting new feature. Why was this a valuable tool for you and for other filmmakers?Bryant: The Cinema RAW Light format is a big step forward for Canon. I think it speaks largely to where they are putting their focus. I hope they implement this format in all of their cinema cameras down the line. You are getting a 12bit 4K image at around 1gbps data rate. Thats an enormous amount of information to capture, but they’ve managed to get it to 1/3-1/5 the size of typical RAW. This is exciting and empowering to filmmakers because for the first time, you have this format as a real option at a relatively low price point. For us, it only strengthened our film to help illustrate the colorful journey of our fish.PB: How was working with the Canon ecosystem of products from the camera to the lenses and monitors?Andrew: As a filmmaker, we each have our own set of gear that we like to bring out with us in the field. Generally, it’s pieced together from things made by different manufacturers, and often it can be a challenge for the camera team to “make it all work together.” Going out with only Canon gear actually made it a whole lot easier in the field. As much as we all hold on to the tools that we have always worked with, the Canon lenses actually do complement the Canon camera nicely, and having the Canon monitor with us out in the field was really beneficial. The pieces all do actually want to work together, which at the very least, makes the AC’s day a whole lot more efficient.Bryant: It is exactly that. An ecosystem. Canon seems to be focusing on capturing quality in the image and its evident through the whole pipeline. The lenses work well and interact with their cameras. The images display very well on their monitors. We sent an ungraded LOG 3 image to their 2420 Reference Display, and it debayered that signal to show us a rec2020 image. It was seamless integration.PB: 4K at 60fps is refreshing to see on this camera. How useful was this for the film and how did it perform?Andrew: We were really happy with how the 60-frame footage looked in post. I think it held up really nicely and being able to shoot high speed at 4K is a huge benefit at this point.Bryant: This was a very useful feature. We could easily switch right into 59.94 and then slow it down later in post. The image looks graceful and showed no signs of blocking or pattern issues. It performed quite well for us.PB: What types of projects do you see the Canon C200 excelling at?Bryant: The gear is only getting better. I see the C200 excelling in many different situations. You can use it on virtually anything as long as you can handle the data. They’ve kept the form factor small enough that you could throw a nice prime or even L series zoom on it and go rogue or you can build it out for a studio type configuration. The possibilities are almost endless. You can see in our BTS we had it in a few different configurations to achieve different shots, and that’s because of its small size.Andrew: The C200 offers a really high end look and color spectrum, while maintaining a relatively small footprint.  I can see using this on a variety of projects, especially those that want to balance the flexibility of a verité approach with more high-end, commercial cinematography.PB: Bryant, how did the C200 perform with skin tones and overall image quality?Bryant: Canon is known for their color science. They’ve certainly kept true to that with the C200. And that is only enhanced further with the RAW Light format. Having a 12bit image to push around later gives tremendous flexibility to achieve any kind of look you may want. We were going for something very natural and clean. We got that and some with this camera.PB: Bryant, I noticed you had a lot of gimbal shots in the film. How was the process of setting up the camera with the gimbal?Bryant: It was like setting up any other camera. The exciting thing about the C200 was its size and weight. It didn’t take very long to balance because it’s all conveniently packed into a small body. The gimbals we used had no trouble with it.PB: What surprised you the most about working with the Canon C200?Andrew: Honestly, my only pleasant surprise was that everything worked so well on the prototype camera.  I was so worried that we would get this un-tested camera out in the field and it just wouldn’t work.  Thankfully, I had nothing to worry about.  It all worked perfectly.Bryant: The most surprising thing to me was the level of detail the camera captures especially with the RAW Light format. When you see the image for yourself on a proper display, it’s really stunning. It’s refreshing to see the level of color and soft sharpness (if that makes sense) this camera delivers.How do you feel about the new C200? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

HBO’s New Documentary “Spielberg” Is a Must-See for Aspiring Directors

first_imgHBO’s “Spielberg” is more than a biography, it’s a mini masterclass detailing some of the most influential scenes in the history of American cinema.Cover image via HBO.Warning: contains spoilers!The opening scenes of HBO’s newest documentary, Spielberg, might leave you at a loss of words. You aren’t expecting the iconic, creeping sunrise of the entrance into the desert sequence from David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia. Even more, you don’t expect to hear Spielberg say that it was Lean’s masterpiece that “set the bar too high” for the sixteen-year-old filmmaker — and that he no longer wanted to make movies. Fortunately, he didn’t quit.In fact, Lawrence of Arabia was a catalyst for the young filmmaker, who would return each week to watch, analyze, and dissect the film.It was the first time seeing a movie [wherein] I realized there are themes that are not narrative story themes, but themes that are character themes … David Lean created a portraiture; surrounded the portrait with a mural of scope and epic action; but at the heart and core of Lawrence of Arabia is “Who am I?” —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s the question “Who am I” that defines the arc of Spielberg’s career and serves as a focal point in Susan Lacy‘s newest documentary on one of American cinema’s greatest filmmakers.Video via HBO.What Can Aspiring Filmmakers Learn from Spielberg?The documentary is epic in scope: a veritable 2.5 hours of Spielberg unpacking pivotal scenes from films like Munich, Schindler’s List, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as well as several of his lesser-known early films and flops.Aspiring directors, screenwriters, and cinematographers can glean strategies and approaches for creating memorable and relatable characters, crafting visual stories using the tools of the cinema, and how Spielberg thrived in uncertain situations.But perhaps more importantly, we see the man behind the movies. And for those of us who grew up watching those movies, it’s a dose of inspiration on par with rapture.On Visual StorytellingImage via British Film Institute.For me, directing is camera work. So I’m very on the frontline of that. I’ve got to set up the shot, I’ve got to block the actors, choreograph the movement of the scene, bring the camera into the choreography, figure out where the camera stops, where it moves, how far it moves … so I’ve always got my eye on the lens and that’s what I do. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s evident, even in his earliest films, that Spielberg understands the medium; he just gets “camera work,” as he calls it. Moreover, he doesn’t rely on dialogue, music, or any sound effects to tell a story. In other words, he uses the visual nature of moving pictures and images to propel the narrative forward.To demonstrate this, turn off your sound, and watch this nail-biting scene from Munich.Video via YouTube.Without hearing a single line of dialogue, or swell in music, we know the following about the scene:The scenario (or location).The players involved.The stakes.The ticking clock.All of the things necessary for creating suspense.“Geography is one of the most important things to me,” says Spielberg, “so the audience isn’t thrown into chaos trying to figure out the story that you’re telling.”In this scene from Munich, Spielberg made deliberate choices about subject, camera placement, and movement. Not a single shot appears unless it earned its way into the reel — and thus propels the story forward. As audience members, we get a clear picture of who and where the players are — and in this case what would happen if the clock runs out.This is an excellent scene for directors and cinematographers to study.On LightingImage via I Can’t Unsee That Movie.Everything we do in this medium is about light and shadow. It’s how the cinematographer lights the actors, lights the set. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergGood lighting makes your actors look pretty; great lighting tells a story. Schindler’s List is an excellent example of this. Spielberg, working alongside his long-time friend and go-to cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski, crafted lighting setups that emphasized the personality and emotions of the characters at different stages of the story.Let’s examine the approach taken to light Amon Goethe and Oskar Schindler, the story’s main antagonist and protagonist, respectively.Amon Goethe, played by Ralph Fiennes, is a Nazi officer who is inhumane and unapologetically cruel in his treatment of Jews. Although he’s an extremely nasty fellow, he is never conflicted by his actions. You’ll notice in the film that he’s always lit beautifully from the front, with very minimal shadows — his character (and conscience for that matter) was very clear.In contrast, Oskar Schindler was a conflicted individual. Beginning the story as a shrewd businessman and member of the Nazi party, he slowly begins to question the morality of his by-standing. During this time of inner conflict, his lighting is directional and from the side, creating shadows on his face (see picture above). However, as the film progresses, his inner conflict subsides, and he’s lit with more frontal, softer light, because he’s learning who he is.Find opportunities to use light as a storytelling device — not only a means to expose your shot.On Uncertainty and FailureImage via Whale Bone Mag.There are going to be moments, where you get to set, and you are not going to know what the hell you’re doing. It happens to all of us; you’ve got to guard that secret with your life. Let no one see when you’re unsure of yourself … or you lose the respect of everyone. —Steven Spielberg quoting his mentor Henry Hathaway, SpielbergFailure is not optional — at least not for filmmakers. What Spielberg teaches us is that, with a little creativity, failure can lead to great success. There’s no better film that demonstrates this than Jaws.You may have heard the stories of the shark breaking down and sinking … all of it’s true.The original script for Jaws featured the shark everywhere, and it called for the great white to be on-screen far more often than what we saw in the finished film. However, due to frequent breakdowns and mechanical failures, the shark was in repair for a majority of the 100+ day shoot.Therefore, Spielberg and his team had to get creative. How could they employ a device that suggested the shark was near without actually showing the shark on-screen?“The yellow barrels were a godsend,” says Spielberg, who used the props to indicate that the shark was near and ready to attack. Paired with John Williams‘s, unforgettable score, the audience knew exactly when the shark was about to strike … and we were terrified.“If the shark had been available visually,” says Williams, “it would’ve changed the whole psychology of the experience.”Image via The Soul of the Plot.Spielberg premiered on HBO on October 7.Looking for more filmmaking inspiration? Check out these articles.Navigating the Challenges of the One-Take Short FilmA Look Inside the Post-Production Process Behind “It”Interview: Director of Photography Jake Swantko of Netflix’s Icarus“Five Came Back” — Lessons from Famous Directors During WWIIThe Power of Shooting with a Shallow Depth of Fieldlast_img read more

Opportunity Lifespans Are Measured in Dog Years

first_imgI know that you love your opportunity. You’ve had this opportunity for a long, long time. You were thrilled when you got it, and you rushed back to the office to enter it into your pipeline. You spent a lot of time with your then new opportunity, and you helped it to grow and mature.But opportunities don’t age well. They don’t live as long as humans. You aren’t that much older than when you first found your opportunity, but your opportunity has grown to be quite old. The longer an opportunity lives in your pipeline, the more certain it is that the opportunity has serious health problems. It is no longer a healthy opportunity.I know that you love this opportunity. He’s like an old friend, a trusted companion. You have had all kinds of adventures together. You have lots of cute and funny stories about you and your opportunity. Each day when you open up your sales force automation software, your opportunity is there, waiting for you, protecting you from an otherwise too shallow pipeline.But you aren’t going to be able to keep your opportunity for your whole adult life. There comes a time when you have to part with your old opportunity. It’s old, its health has failed, and you have to let it go. You’ve only been keeping this opportunity alive because you can’t stand to part with it. You can’t imagine your life without your special opportunity. But it’s time to say goodbye and finally part with your opportunity.It’s sad. It hurts. I know.But this doesn’t have to be the end of the story. Over time, the pain will subside, and life will go on. I know nothing will ever replace your special opportunity, but you can go and find another opportunity. Many of your dream clients are suffering from neglect and abuse. They need a good home. You can go out and get yourself a new one.If you want to keep an opportunity forever, make sure you help it grow into a client. That’s the only way you get to keep it.QuestionsWhy don’t opportunities age well?What kind of health problems do old opportunities typically suffer from as they age?How do you know when an opportunity is no longer really an opportunity?Why do some salespeople struggle to part with old opportunities that aren’t ever going to result in a deal? Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

A Recipe for Success

first_imgDo the work that needs to be done.Have a great attitude.Play hard.Stick to it, even when it gets tough.Don’t wait. Take action now.Be creative and find a way.Care about other people.Be kind.Listen to other people.Bring your passionate best self to everything you do.last_img

Your Client Didn’t Abandon You. You Abandoned Them.

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now When you lose a long time client, it can feel like you’re being abandoned. You’ve stood together through what seems like a lifetime of battles and challenges, always finding a way, no matter how difficult. You had a relationship. Now it’s over.But it isn’t likely that your client abandoned you. It’s more likely that you abandoned them. One of the three following reasons is at the root of your loss. Study them, make changes, and prevent the loss of another client.NeglectThe most common way to lose a client is through neglect. Relationships require careful care and feeding. Ignoring your clients is a form of neglect.You used to call. You used to make appointments for face-to-face visits. You used to send articles that your client would find helpful in thinking about their business. Now . . . nothing. It’s been a long time. Too long.Neglect is form of abandonment. When you discover that your client has opened a new relationship with your competitor, they didn’t abandon you. You abandoned them.ComplacencyAnother way you can abandon your client is to become complacent.Remember how you used to ensure that all of your client’s problems and challenges were taken care of? Remember how you used to follow up to make sure that they were getting the results that they needed? Well they remember too. And they can feel the empty space where the salesperson that cared about them used to be.Because you have a client now doesn’t mean you are entitled to keep them. Just because you created tremendous value for them in the past doesn’t mean you have a right to their business in perpetuity.Complacency is a form of arrogance or a form of laziness, and either leads to abandonment.Failure to GrowYour client’s needs are going to change over time. They are growing and their needs are growing along with them. And if they’re struggling, their needs are changing too. In order to help your clients take advantage of the opportunities they come across, you have to grow. If they have greater challenges than ever, you have to grow big enough to help them overcome those challenges.If you don’t continue to grow, you aren’t going to have the ability to help your clients keep growing. If you are going to keep your client for life, you have to match—or exceed—their growth.Failure to grow is another form of abandonment. You force your clients to need a new partner?In all of these cases, you might feel as if your client abandoned you. The truth of the matter is that your neglect, your complacency, or your failure to grow was your abandonment of your client.QuestionsDid your client abandon you or you them?How does neglect lead to lost clients?How does complacency lead to lost clients?How does a failure to grow lead your clients to need someone new?How do you prevent abandoning your clients?last_img read more

You Are Not Steve Jobs

first_img Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now You are not Steve Jobs. Steve Jobs was Steve Jobs. You can read the books, you can find lessons to take away from what Jobs did at Apple, but you can’t be Steve Jobs. Nor would he want you to be. You never read a story that suggested that Jobs wanted to be Thomas Edison. His success came from being Steve Jobs.You are not Richard Branson. We already have a Richard Branson. There are some lessons you can learn from Branson, but his form of irreverence and resistance to what are considered normal business practices is Branson’s thing. He isn’t who he is because he wants you to be another version of Branson. You’ve never read a story that Branson wanted to be Rockefeller. Branson is successful because he is being Branson.You are not the next Zuckerberg, the next Gates, the next Buffet, the next Musk, or the next Rockefeller. These people aren’t trying to be someone else. All of them were and are originals. That is what makes them special.There are lessons you can learn from reading about other people who have succeeded in entrepreneurial endeavors. There are principles that you can observe, and some that you can actually practice.But you can’t be the next anyone. Your circumstances are different. Your business is different. The people you work with are different. Your opportunities are different, and so are your challenges. You have different strengths, and you have different weaknesses. You are different.Your job is to be the very best version of you possible, not a pale copy that is someone trying to be someone they’re not. You want to be the first and only you.Note: And for God’s sake stop telling people you are a serial entrepreneur. If you start a business, have some success, grind out the work, and make some money. Stop starting half-baked ideas and quit with the half-hearted efforts. Find something you’re passionate enough about to see it through.last_img read more

Professionally Pursue Your Dream Client

first_imgOne of my clients discovered that one of his dream clients was considering a change. They are unhappy with the results they are getting from the 800-pound gorilla in the industry, and they are now open to looking for a company that will get them the results they need. When my client’s company’s name came up, the very senior executive said, “I haven’t heard from anyone there since January.”The statement that no one had called on him for almost nine months wasn’t an offhand remark. It was an indictment. What he was saying is that if my client’s company wanted his business, they would have continued to call on him during the intervening months. Most of the time, the prospective clients of my client calls on an RFP, so most salespeople don’t call on their prospects during the intervening years when they are locked into a contract. It’s interesting that the very C-Level executive doesn’t care about what’s customary. He thinks the people who want his business should be pursuing him.Never Give UpThis story is a lesson for salespeople, especially as it pertains to the pursuit of their dream clients.It isn’t enough to express a passing interest in your dream client or to occasionally check to see if their dormant dissatisfaction has developed enough that they are primed to move. It isn’t enough to call quarterly to check in, or to meet up with your dream client contacts at industry events. These small, infrequent touches, betray a self-interest, teaching your dream client that you only care about them when there is an opportunity for you to compete for their business.Never Go AwayThe truth of the matter is that the competition is occurring right now. The mindshare is being developed between the intervening periods where no salespeople are calling on the dream client because they know that they have a contract and relationships. The relationships that create opportunities develop over time, and relationships are something that can’t be easily developed when you are transactional.If you are going to pursue your dream client, pursue them. Continually call, nurture, and meet with the contacts within your dream client’s company. If you are sporadic in your effort, you will be indicted for your lack of professional pursuit. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Stop Avoiding the One Thing Standing Between You and Success

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now The biggest obstacle between you and what you want isn’t outside of you. It never was, is not now, and never will be.It’s Out There. Somewhere.You can easily spot people who believe their problems lie somewhere outside themselves. They focus in on things over which they have no control, and never on the one thing over which they have the most control.There is no end to the challenges the world faces right now. It is easier to focus on what’s wrong with the world today as a means of avoiding the areas where you need to, and can, make improvements. When you improve yourself, you also improve your little corner of the world, and you build your capacity to make a greater difference.Politics is an easy place to go to avoid dealing with your real problems. In fact, many of the people who spend their time worrying about partisan politics do so as a way to avoid addressing what really needs to change in their life. The changes you need to make are not going to be addressed by any politician or government agency. While elections are important, they aren’t nearly as important as what you can do for yourself.Some folks spend all of their time looking for what is wrong with other people, and recounting the sins of others to anyone who will listen. They can tell you what’s wrong with everyone they know, and they can tell you what’s wrong with a lot of people they’ve never met. They can identify the flaws in everyone except themselves. By looking outward for what’s wrong with other folks, they don’t have to look inward to see what’s really wrong.Problems don’t age well. Tiny monsters grow up to be bigger monsters. By avoiding the areas you need to improve, you not only limit your success, you sabotage it.It’s Inside of You Right NowYou are the single biggest obstacle to your own success. The difference between where you are now and where you want to be is made up of what you believe, what you are doing now, and what you are not doing now. It isn’t something outside of you.Because this is true, everything you need to go from where you are to where you want to be is also inside you right now. Right now you have potential. This means you have the capacity to be more, to do more, to have more, and to contribute more.There is nothing outside of you that deserves so much of your attention that it prevents you from focusing on what you really need to change.last_img read more

Stop Complaining That You Have Clients

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Your customer is difficult. The challenges they provide you are extremely hard to overcome. Many of the problems stem from the changes they need to make, and making those changes would help you help them. You can be unhappy about that fact, or your can be grateful that this is your client.Your client expects you to respond to their needs quicker than you believe you should have to. What they want is something you can and will provide them—with or without the conversation they seem to need. You can work yourself up about having to hold their hand, or you can be grateful they have asked for your help at all.Your client makes a lot of changes. Once you figure out how to execute, they move the goal post, and you have to start over again. This takes time and energy, and it means you repeat the same work over again. You can wish you didn’t have to do this work, or you can be grateful that you are the one doing it.One of the contacts at a client is super needy. They take more time than any other contact you deal with—even at much larger clients. You can resent that you get their phone calls and emails, or you can be thankful that you have a relationship all locked up, free from a competitive displacement.Here’s the rub. The client you believe is a burden is the very client your competitors are trying to take from you right now. What you perceive as problems, challenges, and obstacles, they see as opportunities. Your competitors would be happy to relieve you of the burden of having to work with challenging clients. They would be overjoyed by the opportunity to respond to their needs in your stead. They would make the changes needed to execute, even if wasn’t easy. Right now, one of your competitors is hoping that you don’t pick up the phone when your client calls, and they hope your absence creates an opportunity for them to be there for your client.Complacency kills. Neglect kills. Entitlement kills even faster.If you don’t like your clients, you don’t have to keep them. Someone else will gladly take them off your hands. You don’t have an absolute right to keep their business. Stop complaining that you have clients.last_img read more

The Power in Clarity of Purpose

first_imgLast weekend I was reviewing my projects and tasks when I recognized how many of the projects and tasks had nothing to do with my goals now. I accumulated this list over the course of the last seven or eight years, and many of the tasks and projects are no longer relevant, and some of them belonged to issues that had been resolved over time. A good portion of them were things I am no longer interested in nor are they worth the investment of my time. Many of them are ideas and projects  I would love to work on, but I haven’t touched since they went on the list.Even though it is critical to capture everything you want or need to do in a place where you can track those projects, ideas, and tasks, not everything can be substantial enough to command your time and energy. Deciding to release myself from the obligation I had to what was no longer relevant, I exported the entire list to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (so I could be sure to have a record to review later) and pushed the delete button. All the tasks and projects disappeared, along with the power they held over me.I started over, typing in the major projects and outcomes that I genuinely care about and that are going to move me closer to my goals and aligned with my purpose. I added in the commitments I owe to other people, of which there were far fewer than I imagined. The list I deleted had 298 tasks, and the new list consists of 50 in 22 projects. About 15 of those tasks are routine maintenance, the things that I do every week, including things like emptying all my electronic inboxes and physical inboxes, and reviewing my lists and transferring the stuff I need to do into my analog sales planner.My project list and task lists are now much smaller. All the items on those lists are vital to me now. I liked a lot of ideas and potential projects that are on the list I deleted, and someday a few of them may resurface. What I have now is not a greater sense of control, but also a greater sense of clarity. Which brings us to the big idea.We collect a lot of projects and tasks and commitments. We make many more commitments than we realize, some which seem small and innocuous when we make them. Over time, the list of things that we have said yes to, and the list of things that someone else commits us to, without us recognizing how overcommitted we are. Each new project or tasks commands a tiny sliver of our remaining time, and energy, and focus. Even though we aren’t always conscious of each of those commitments, they each take a little bit of our psychic RAM, and they contribute to an overall sense of overwhelm.Starting with a clean sheet of paper provides a sense of clarity. It’s a chance to decide what is important to you, and an opportunity to release yourself from things that are no longer who you are—and no longer part of what you are here to do. If any of what is here resonates with you, I invite you to give yourself the gift of a do-over and write down what you want, what projects are critical to you, and what you should be doing with your limited time and energy to make the contribution you are here to make.After I deleted my task list, I wrote this post that I published on the blog yesterday: Being Overcommitted is a Sign of Being Uncommitted to Your Goals.last_img read more

Why You Need to Explore the Marketplace of Beliefs and Ideas

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Now There are a variety of ideas and beliefs available to you. Sadly, you are mostly infected with them, and less often do you intentionally select those ideas and beliefs that will best serve you. The ideas you picked up along the way on your journey to where you are now may or may not be serving you. If they are not serving you, that is reason enough to evaluate other ideas and beliefs.If you were to look at one part of your life where you are not generating the results you want—or need—you would invariably see a set of actions that are causing your poor results (even if the action that causes poor results is a lack of action). Behind those actions are beliefs that support the action, or lack thereof. For example, procrastination is an action that causes poor results, but the belief is that you can put off until tomorrow what you should do right now. The belief behind that belief is that you have plenty of time, even though all you have ever had or will ever have is the present moment in which to do anything.Say you want better results. The first thing you might do is to go to the marketplace and explore new ideas and beliefs that may interest you and which might suit you better. Once you are in the marketplace, you must decide where to start your search for something better. There are two places one should almost always look, where there is success, and where there is something with which you disagree.When Someone Has What You WantIf someone already has what you want, they have a set of beliefs and are taking a certain set of actions to produce the result you want. The fact that their ideas and beliefs and actions work for them doesn’t necessarily mean it is the one right answer, and it doesn’t mean that their way will necessarily be your way, but it’s worth exploring. There may also be people who have similar ideas and beliefs but have very different strategies and are taking different actions to produce the same result. Remember, this is a marketplace, and that means you are shopping.One of the ways you accelerate your growth and development is by discovering what already works. You don’t always have to learn everything yourself, especially if the beliefs and methods to produce that result have been reverse-engineered for you.If It Generates an Emotional ResponseThere is this spot at the very end of the marketplace where it is dimly lit and scary. From where you stand, it looks dangerous, and it may cause you to feel something like a cross between fear and revulsion. In this part of the marketplace, the ideas and beliefs and actions conflict with your beliefs, including some that are your most cherished and deeply-held beliefs. You don’t want to explore this part of the marketplace, because looking at any of these ideas might mean you have to give up what you already know and believe and prefer. And this is why you must venture into this part of the marketplace.There are ideas and beliefs you don’t like that underlie the very outcomes you want. There are actions you refuse to take that others are using to produce the very results you seek. What you see that conflicts with what you believe is an opportunity for growth and development.Seth Godin told me he doesn’t write as many books as he once did because his ALTmba produces better results faster. As a writer, I don’t like that, but I am sitting with it because there is a truth there worth considering.If you want to become the version of yourself that comes after this one, you must be willing to let go of the things that will keep you solidly locked in place.last_img read more

Is What You Sell of Vital Importance?

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Is the conversation that you want to have with your dream client around something vital? Is it something so important, so necessary that it should command their attention?Not ProductIn some rare cases, your product may rise to the level of being vital, demanding your dream client’s time, attention, and resources. This may be true when they are struggling to obtain whatever it is you sell, but less likely if they are already getting what you sell from your competitor. When the latter is true, when they already have what they need, the tiny improvement your product might produce is not a critical issue.Not ServiceService issues and failures can disrupt a business, creating a strategic issue in an area where one would not exist if their current partner was executing well enough. Unless the day-to-day issues rise to the level that make it worth suffering through the switching costs, you aren’t like to displace your competitor by promising a better experience when your prospect has learned to live with the challenges that happen in the normal course of business.Not a Few PenniesYou might be able to produce a better turn on the investment your prospect makes, and you may be able to reduce their pricing and show them some savings. There are, believe it or not, some salespeople and sales organizations that still lead with a lower price as a way to reduce their prospect’s costs as a way to improve the ROI. Sophisticated, savvy business people aren’t easily lured into changing partners for a lower price because they know that they are taking money out of their solution. Because saving a few pennies doesn’t move the needle, it isn’t a vital issue (and when saving a few pennies is vital, your prospect may not be doing well).What makes something vital is how important it is to producing the necessary or critical outcomes your prospect needs. The things that rise to being vital tend to be the more strategic outcomes, things that contribute to the goals and the direction of the people who decide when—and if—they are going to entertain the idea of changing what they are doing.When you show someone your product in the first five minutes of a call, you have identified yourself as someone who wants to talk about something non-vital.last_img read more

Kevin Eikenberry on Effectively Leading From a Distance – Episode #122

first_imgPodcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 39:10 — 31.4MB)Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | Email | Google Podcasts | RSSLeading from a distance is a thing these days – because remote teams and distributed workforces are becoming more and more common. With that reality come a number of difficulties, all the leader’s responsibility to solve. In order to bring some insight to the issues involved, Anthony invited Kevin Eikenberry to be his guest. Kevin has given a good deal of his life to thinking about leadership and has made it his mission to learn all he can about the way leaders need to modify and improve their leadership when it comes to dealing with remote teams. This conversation is intriguing – but it’s just the tip of the iceberg. Be sure you listen and be sure you grab Kevin’s new book, “Long Distance Leader.”.@KevinEikenberry shares how to effectively #lead from a distance on this episode of #InTheArena with @iannarino. #leadership #remoteworkClick To TweetManagement and leadership are not the same thingsIt’s entirely possible to be a great manager and a terrible leader. The reverse is true as well. Kevin Eikenberry points out this difference because so many people are placed in a management position and may even excel at the organizational part of their role, then mistakenly think that makes them a leader. In this conversation, Anthony and Kevin dig into the distinctions between managers and leaders, outline why leadership requires clear communication and great connection with individuals, and how accountability works in a healthier manner when it is based on good leadership.When teams don’t “go to work” anymore, how can leaders trust them?There are still many places in the world where team members assemble in the same geographic location every day to get work done together. But more and more companies are allowing their employees to operate from a home office at least part of the week while still other teams intentionally build an entirely remote workforce. What are the things leaders need to do in order to ensure that their team is actually working when they are not under their direct, in-person supervision? Here are a few clues: it has to do with culture, hiring the right people, and trust – and the leader is responsible for all of those. Listen as Kevin Eikenberry explains.When #teams don’t “go to work” anymore, how can #leaders trust them? Find out how @KevinEikenberry sees it on this episode of #InTheArena with @iannarino. #leadership #remoteworkClick To TweetCultures will exist. It’s up to the leader to create one that empowers and executes on its goalsKevin Eikenberry points out that many people these days are talking about culture as if it’s something that’s missing and needs to be created. The reality is that your team already has a culture – it just may not be the one you want. In this conversation, you’ll receive Kevin’s insights about the type of culture that empowers effective distributed teams, what leaders need to do in order to foster that kind of culture, and hear a few anecdotes about how Kevin has seen a shift in culture make all the difference. You won’t want to miss it.Communication nightmares in your team? Turn off your email and turn on your webcamWe have no shortage of communication tools these days, so leaders have no excuse for establishing effective communication within their teams. However, teams can often find themselves running in circles and belaboring problems when a switch from one communication tool to another could help them clearly define problems and get to solutions quickly. Kevin explains how he encourages his team to avoid that kind of thing by simply turning on their webcams. Not only is it possible to communicate more efficiently through video, it’s also possible to build culture and a sense of deeper intimacy as a team at the same time. Learn why face to face communication is still the gold standard for communication in our technological age, on this episode of In The Arena.#Communication nightmares in your team? Turn off your email and turn on your #webcam. @KevinEikenberry explains the benefits on this episode of #InTheArena with @iannarino. #leadership #remoteworkClick To TweetOutline of this great episode The vital difference between a manager and a leader and why it matters When people don’t “go to work” anymore, how can leaders trust their team? The risk leaders must take in building culture and holding teams accountable How do leaders assure that their goals are being pursued by a remote team? The communication tools that help leaders connect with their team these daysResources & Links mentioned in this episodeKevin Eikenberry’s websitewww.RemoteLeadershipInstitute.comwww.LongDistanceLeader.com or The Long-Distance Leader on AmazonBOOK: RemoteSPONSOR:The Iannarino Sales AcceleratorTom PetersSlackSPONSOR:The Outbound ConferenceSPONSOR:www.B2BSalesToolkit.comThe theme song “Into the Arena” is written and produced by Chris Sernel. You can find it on SoundcloudConnect with AnthonyWebsite: www.TheSalesBlog.comYoutube: www.Youtube.com/IannarinoFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/iannarinoTwitter: https://twitter.com/iannarinoGoogle Plus: https://plus.google.com/+SAnthonyIannarinoLinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/iannarino Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Now Tweets you can use to share this episode#Management and #leadership are not the same things. Hear @KevinEikenberry explain why and how to amplify your role as a #leader, on this episode of #InTheArena with @iannarino. #leadership #remoteworkClick To Tweet#Cultures will exist. It’s up to the #leader to create one that empowers and executes on its #goals. That’s a gem from @KevinEikenberry that you’ll hear on this episode of #InTheArena with @iannarino. #leadership #remoteworkClick To TweetSubscribe toIn the ArenaApple PodcastsGoogle PodcastsAndroidby EmailRSSOr subscribe with your favorite app by using the address belowlast_img read more