Northern Power move will cost jobs

first_imgDISTRIBUTED ENERGY COMBINING NORTHERN POWER & PROTON ENERGYTO STRENGTHEN OPERATIONS, REDUCE COSTWALLINGFORD, CT, January 31, 2007 — Distributed Energy Systems Corp. (NASDAQ: DESC), today announced it will combine its two subsidiaries Northern Power Systems and Proton Energy Systems — to reduce cost and strengthen systems sales, engineering, production, service and technology development.The company, which creates and delivers products and solutions for the decentralized energy marketplace, said the reorganization will result in a charge against 2007s first-quarter results of approximately $1.0 million, or $0.03 per share, to account for staff reductions, reflecting the elimination of about 60 jobs, or 20% of the workforce, and related expenses. The reorganization is estimated to result in savings of approximately $4-$5 million, on an annualized basis, beginning in the second quarter of 2007. In addition, the Waitsfield, VT, location will be closed, and its activities moved to the companys 110,000-square-foot Barre, VT facility.During the past year, it became increasingly clear that we would benefit going forward by implementing our strategy now, to become a one-company organization, said Ambrose L. Schwallie, Distributed Energys chief executive officer. We expect these changes to improve sales and marketing effectiveness, reduce costs, enhance efficiencies of our systems engineering, products and service capabilities, and enable more and better cross-fertilization in advanced technology development.This new functional structure, Mr. Schwallie continued, allows us to focus more precisely on the markets, critical business drivers and capabilities that give Distributed Energy the best prospects for the higher-margin revenues we need to foster strong, sustained, profitable growth. Taking this action promptly will, we believe, enable the company to make better progress toward our goal of reaching profitability.Markets and OrganizationDiscussing the reorganization further, the Distributed Energy CEO cited the companys emphasis on power generation and power electronics systems, systems engineering and combined heat-and-power projects, products and services for oil and gas exploration markets, larger-scale wind projects for power generation, and commercial hydrogen, renewable fuels, and waste-to-energy technologies.To implement the reorganization, Mr. Schwallie also announced the appointment of three senior vice presidents to company-wide functional positions, all reporting to him:”Mark Murray now leads the sales and marketing functions for all of Distributed Energy products, systems and services. Mr. Murray most recently headed the companys commercial hydrogen business.”Betsy Anderson assumes responsibility for all of the companys engineering, production, project management and service activities, expanding her prior operating responsibilities beyond energy systems, products and services.”Robert Friedland takes on management duties encompassing all technology innovation, including the hydrogen research and development programs that he previously ran.Under their experienced leadership, Mr. Schwallie said, the company will work to strengthen lines of communication and operating efficiencies within the company, improve our impact in the marketplace, and continue to pursue the ideas and technologies that can enable Distributed Energy to be one of the leaders in alternative and renewable energy solutions.Mr. Schwallie concluded: This new unified focus should begin to be reflected in 2007 operating results. We believe this new, revitalized organization will put Distributed Energy in a stronger position to drive improved operating margins, and better serve markets where our capabilities and business models deliver valuable benefits to customers, now and in the years ahead.About Distributed Energy Systems Corp.Distributed Energy Systems Corp. (NASDAQ: DESC) creates and delivers products and solutions to the emerging decentralized energy marketplace, giving users greater control over their energy cost, quality and reliability. The company delivers a combination of practical, ready-today energy solutions and the solid business platforms for capitalizing on the changing energy landscape. For more information visit http://www.distributed-energy.com(link is external).last_img read more

Sales Increase for 19th Consecutive Quarter at Bruegger’s

first_imgMarking 19 consecutive quarters of growth, Bruegger’s Enterprises, Inc. has announced revenue for comparable sales grew 6.6 percent at company locations and 6.9 percent system-wide for the fourth quarter ending December 30, 2008. For the 2008 fiscal year, same store sales increased 4.2 percent for the company and 3.9 percent for the system, aided by one extra week versus 2007. Bruegger’s gross sales reached $198.9 million system wide in 2008; an 11.3 percent rise over the same period in 2007.”Hitting the mark of reaching our 19th consecutive quarter of sales increase was indeed an accomplishment,” said Bruegger’s Chief Executive Officer Jim Greco. “By focusing in on our core values of providing great service, great food and great value, we were able to continue to build sales in spite of the economy. It is a testament to the entire Bruegger’s team and our loyal following.”New Menu Items and LocationsDuring the fourth quarter, Bruegger’s continued to promote the Farmer’s Omelet which was introduced in Q3. The company also kicked off its annual Bottomless Mug promotion in Q4 with a new keytag option in addition to the travel mug and cards.Also during the fourth quarter, Bruegger’s opened corporate bakeries in Greensboro, N.C., Jenkintown, Pa. and Arlington, Va., as well as franchise- operated bakeries in Orange, Conn., Raleigh, N.C. and in Raleigh-Durham Airport bringing the total to 288 bakeries in 23 states and the District of Columbia. New bakery expansion will continue with four bakeries set to open in Q1 2009.About Bruegger’s Enterprises, Inc.Bruegger’s Enterprises, Inc., an affiliate of Sun Capital Partners, Inc., is a leader in the fast casual restaurant segment. Bruegger’s is dedicated to serving delicious, healthy food that brings guests back again and again. In 288 neighborhood bakery-cafes in 23 states and the District of Columbia, Bruegger’s offers a warm, comfortable setting for guests to enjoy a wholesome meal with family and friends. Famous for authentic boiled and baked bagels, Bruegger’s bakers lend their expertise to crafting a variety of other stone- hearth baked breads, such as Ciabatta and the exclusive Softwich. Guests can count on innovative menu items, including unique cream cheese flavors, delicious breakfast sandwiches and wraps, hand-tossed salads, hearty soups, signature and custom order sandwiches, desserts, and Fair Trade Green Mountain coffee blends. Founded in 1983, Bruegger’s is headquartered in Burlington, Vermont and supports its neighbors in every community it serves. For more information, please visit www.brueggers.com(link is external).BURLINGTON, Vt., Feb. 5 /PRNewswire/last_img read more

Secretary of State Jim Condos to develop ‘Vermont Transparency Tour’

first_imgSecretary of State Jim Condos announced today that he is embarking on a ‘Vermont Transparency Tour’ to travel the state to help educate and train local and state government officials on the laws of the state regarding Access to Public Records and Open Meetings.   He said at least 12 training sessions are envisioned this summer.  ‘A change of the culture and attitude towards access to public records and open meetings is necessary for both state and local government,’ Condos said.  ‘Open government is good government,’ Condos stated in announcing the tour.   ‘Distrust in government is not good for our democratic process ‘ the public has a right to know the truth about what the government is doing.’ Condos continues, ‘As new legislation designed to provide for greater transparency in public records and open meetings progresses in the statehouse, it has become evident that local and state officials need training to better understand the law.’ This week Condos approached the Vermont League of Cities and Towns, Vermont School Boards Association, Vermont Municipal Clerks and Treasurers, American Civil Liberties Union, Common Cause, and the Vermont Press Association to ask for their support of this endeavor. Condos is pleased to say that all have agreed that additional training is important and support the idea of taking this on the road.  Other groups will also be asked to endorse the plan. While the training sessions are designed for all state and local government officials, they will be open to the public.  The initial idea is to schedule two sessions a day, for two days a week over a three or four week period.  The locations will be sprinkled across Vermont and will allow most government officials to be within an hour’s drive of at least two or more sessions. Jim Condos is Vermont’s Secretary of State, after serving eight years as a Vermont Senator from Chittenden County, 18 years on South Burlington City Council and 30+ years of private sector business experience. Source: Condos’ office. 4.29.2011last_img read more

Governor Shumlin to refocus state’s relationship with UVM

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin gave the following address regarding the state of Vermont’s relationship with the University of Vermont. The public policy initiative, which would include the state college system, is to better focus the limited financial resources the state has into ‘maximum return on investment,’ as the governor put it, with particular focus on advancing science, engineering, technology and mathematics education.To this end, he announced a working group comprised of prominent Vermonters with ties to UVM and led by Nick Donofrio, a former top executive at IBM in Vermont. They are charged with identifying key issues between the state and the university and making recommendations that will be presented to the governor and the new UVM president next July. UVM Interim President John Bramley is also a member of the group.Shumlin made his remarks Tuesday afternoon at the Hoehl Gallery at the UVM College of Medicine.Remarks by Governor Peter ShumlinUniversity of VermontNovember 8, 2011Good afternoon and thank you for being here. I am here today on the University of Vermont campus to talk about the future of the university and its essential relationship with the state of Vermont. This is a topic that means a lot to me. I am convinced that Vermont can become known nationally as the Education State in the coming years, and that UVM will play a critical role in that evolution.To be clear, the state of higher education in Vermont is already strong. In addition to UVM, our state colleges and independent colleges consistently rank among the top in the nation. Young Vermonters and students from across the country are receiving a world-class education right now in the Green Mountain State. These schools have a $3 billion impact annually on Vermont’s economy.Since my focus today is on UVM, let me say a few words specifically about the University and its unique role in our state. UVM is a state treasure and a huge asset. It is the state’s only research university, contributing $1 billion a year to our economy. It retains and graduates Vermont students at record rates, and attracts thousands of young from across the nation and the world to study and live here. Its research and knowledge creation is key to Vermont’s future. Nearly 30,000 UVM graduates live and work here, contributing every day to our state’s quality of life.Just take a look at UVM’s vision and mission and you will hope, like I do, that the University succeeds in fulfilling them for the benefit of its students, our state, and our nation.UVM’s vision is, and I quote, ‘To be among the nation’s premier small research universities, preeminent in our comprehensive commitment to liberal education, environment, health, and public service.’The university’s mission is ‘To create, evaluate, share, and apply knowledge and to prepare students to be accountable leaders who will bring to their work dedication to the global community, a grasp of complexity, effective problem-solving and communication skills, and an enduring commitment to learning and ethical conduct.’Look around Vermont right now, and you will find the spirit of this mission hard at work. This University produces one of the best trained workforces in the country. Some of you may have heard of UVM graduates Briar and Adam Alpert. Their father, a UVM faculty member, founded BioTek Instruments, a cutting-edge manufacturer of medical equipment right here in Vermont. Briar and Adam have since taken over the company, and as creative entrepreneurs, they have made BioTek one of the best places to work in the state and business has thrived.Similarly, Steve Arms is the founder, President and CEO of MicroStrain, a company which develops and manufactures miniature sensors. Andrew Meyer has been busy since he graduated from UVM, founding the Center for an Agricultural Economy and helping to usher in a new era of innovative, value-added agriculture in Vermont. Other Vermont business leaders produced by this University include Jan Blittersdorf, President and CEO of NRG Systems, David Blittersdorf, President and CEO of AllEarth Renewables, Janette Bombardier, head of IBM’s Essex Plant, and the Pizzagalli brothers, leaders of PC Construction, one of the nation´s largest employee-owned contractors. UVM graduate Rich Tarrant is CEO and founder, with his two brothers, Jerry and Brian ‘ also graduates of the university — of Internet software firm MyWebGrocer. The list is endless.Because the futures of UVM and the state of Vermont are inextricably linked, I believe it is both appropriate and timely to take a hard look at the relationship between the state and the university. Vermont has always had limited resources to fund higher education in general and UVM in particular ‘ a reality made more stark by the continuing recession and the devastating impact of Tropical Storm Irene.The limited state resources we have available must be invested in Vermont’s only research university in strategically focused ways that have the maximum return on investment for Vermont and Vermonters. We have debated how UVM is funded and governed, but not taken action in nearly 60 years. The time to do so is now, with a strong sense of creativity, common sense, and focus on what is good for the future of both the state and the university.Before I lay out a proposal to examine the important relationship between the state and UVM, let me offer a brief historical context.The University of Vermont became public in 1955. At that time, there was no Vermont State College System and no Vermont Student Assistance Corporation. Since 1955, state funds for UVM have been spent in three basic ways: tuition offsets for Vermonters, support for the College of Medicine, and funding for Agricultural services. This year’s state appropriation was about $40 million, with an additional $1.8 million for capital expenditures. While these public dollars represent a small fraction of the combined revenues that support UVM’s $600 million plus operation, both UVM officials and I believe that it is very important that these funds be invested wisely and strategically to advance Vermonters job opportunities.I have made no secret of my concerns about some of the spending priorities UVM has made in recent years. Those concerns have been widely reported in the press, and I stand by those observations. I have said throughout some of these recent controversies, however, that my interest is not in criticizing the University for the sake of argument, but because I believe, working together, we can devise strategies for spending state dollars that produce better results for UVM, for our business community, and for the state.I believe these spending strategies should focus on a set of priorities that require making some hard long-term choices. These priorities include:â ¢ Preparing students for the jobs of the future by providing greater focus on the sciences, engineering, technology and mathematics.â ¢ Connecting the power of the research university and its educational programs to support and expand partnerships in the state’s business sector and economy.â ¢ Maintaining and innovating the essential infrastructure in agriculture that supports our economy and way of life, and fosters Vermont’s bright future as a quality food producer.â ¢ Supporting the transition to a health care system that contains costs, takes the burden off employers and strengthens health care delivery to keep Vermonters healthy.â ¢ Capitalizing on UVM’s leadership in environmental and complex systems ‘ systems that address one of my top priorities, the reality of our changing climate – by expanding its academic programs and offerings in climate change. I have long believed that the University can become a top national leader in this arena and am optimistic about the entrepreneurial opportunities in confronting climate change.â ¢ Preparing our students not only to get good jobs in Vermont when they graduate from UVM, but also for students to go out and create those good jobs as burgeoning entrepreneurs.â ¢ Collaborating with the Vermont State Colleges to ensure that our system of higher education is maximizing opportunities for students, limiting duplication, and increasing access, particularly for first generation college students.Since John Bramley became Interim President at UVM this summer, he and I have been engaged in a dialogue about these priorities and the relationship between the University and the state. While we may not agree on all issues regarding that relationship, I believe John and I share very similar views about the need to take a hard and realistic look at how we work together in the coming years and decades.Specifically, John and I agree that the current situation is not sustainable for the University or its students. We can do a better job of investing scarce state dollars in the disciplines and research that will be the economic engines of the next century. In my view, we are falling short of our goal of maximizing our return on state investment.A new strategy is needed, and today I am announcing a framework for developing that strategy.I have asked a group of eight highly skilled individuals with expertise in a wide range of disciplines, all of whom have deep ties with Vermont or the University of Vermont, to serve as an advisory group that develops ways to maximize the relationship between the University and the state.This group will be asked to examine a set of key issues related to that relationship, and provide recommendations to me and the incoming President of the University by July of next year. Their areas of focus will include, but not be limited to, the following areas:1. The differing roles of the University of Vermont and the Vermont State Colleges, and the implications and opportunities for program consolidation, reduction in duplication, and cost savings.2. Opportunities for public investment in high state priority programs and targeted scholarships at UVM with maximum return on investment, such as science, technology, engineering, and math.3. Directed scholarships in certain disciplines, incentives to stay in Vermont or return to Vermont.4. Other alternative, strategic approaches to focus and strengthen the relationship between UVM and Vermont for mutual benefit, including maximizing spires of excellence, innovation and job growth.The goal of this process is to engage in a strategic, data-driven dialogue that leads to specific, workable, and realistic outcomes.The group will meet regularly, both in person and virtually, and submit their recommendations to me and to the new UVM president taking office next summer. It will include the following individuals:â ¢ Nick Donofrio, chair. Nick is an innovator and entrepreneur and is the former Executive Vice President for Innovation and Technology at IBM and former General Manager of IBM’s plant in Essex.â ¢ Deb Granquist. Deb is a former banker and retired attorney who runs a consulting company to support non-profits. She is active in philanthropy and civic affairs and chairs several local and state boards.â ¢ Bill Wachtel. Bill is a UVM grad, attorney and founding partner of Wachtel & Masyr in New York. He is also the founder of several progressive organizations such as ‘Why Tuesday?, a non-partisan organization to increase voter turnout.â ¢ Peggy Williams. Peggy is President Amerita of Ithaca College and also served as President of Lyndon State College. Another UVM graduate, she holds several leadership positions in national organizations and promotes volunteerism, sustainability, diversity, and civil rights.â ¢ Emerson Lynn. Emerson is the editor-co-publisher of The St. Albans Messenger and co-publisher of The Milton Independent, The Essex Reporter and The Colchester Sun.â ¢ Bill Gilbert. Bill has served as a Trustee of the University of Vermont and has also served Vermont in a variety of notable public positions including Secretary of Administration for the late Gov. Richard Snelling.â ¢ Alma Arteaga. Alma is a junior at UVM majoring in Economics and Environmental Policy and Development and is active on issues impacting UVM and its students.â ¢ John Bramley will also serve as an ex-oficio member of the group.I am confident that these eight outstanding leaders in their fields will produce a thoughtful, provocative, compelling set of recommendations that the state and the University can implement in a timely manner.Let me close by reiterating my strong belief that the partnership between the University of Vermont and the state of Vermont is one that will continue to strengthen in the years ahead. UVM is an essential part of the Vermont culture, economy, and identity and will remain a top priority of the state of Vermont for my administration and many administrations to come.It is with tremendous optimism that I propose this re-examination of the relationship between the state and the University. We have a great opportunity to strengthen an already vibrant relationship. Working together, we will seize it.- 30 –last_img read more