Feds insist emission standards need to strengthen as US moves to ease

first_imgOTTAWA – As Donald Trump’s administration moves towards easing U.S. fuel emission standards for vehicles, the Liberal government says Canada’s standards need to become “stronger,” and it will conduct its own assessment after the American review.Reports emerged this week indicating Trump is set to introduce new rules for auto emissions.The current rules were adopted jointly by former prime minister Stephen Harper and former U.S. president Barack Obama in 2014 with the aim of increasing fuel efficiency for vehicles sold between 2022 and 2025 and reducing greenhouse gas from cars and light trucks.Trump is also expected to challenge California on its ability to independently set regulatory standards.In Canada, officials in Environment Minister Catherine McKenna’s office say they’re watching the U.S. developments closely, but they add that Canada’s standards need to become stronger over time, because transportation accounts for nearly one-quarter of Canada’s greenhouse gas pollution.McKenna and California Gov. Jerry Brown have discussed “our shared goal to fight climate change and promote clean transportation,” said Caroline Theriault, a spokeswoman for the minister.Christopher Sands, a senior research professor and director of the Centre for Canadian Studies at Johns Hopkins University, called the situation a “fascinating” case because it’s an example of U.S.-Canada regulatory co-operation that saw Obama decide on increasing standards and Harper agreeing. But now that co-operation is under threat.Harper had argued it didn’t make sense for the Canadian economy to get ahead of the U.S. economy on environment policy because Canada would bear additional costs, making it less competitive.Even if the U.S. eyes changes to emission standards, it doesn’t necessarily affect Canada’s rules, Sands said, but Canada will have to consider a similar move because the auto industry would prefer not to operate under two sets of regulations.Dan Woynillowicz, policy director for the advocacy group Clean Energy Canada, said the auto sector on both sides of the border will be in for a fairly long period of uncertainty.“Canada has an important role right now to signal its intent to stick to the current standards.”Woynillowicz said it may mean fewer vehicle choices for Canadian consumers, but with globalization of the auto industry there should not be a genuine shortage.last_img read more

UN footing the bill for AFN to attend climate gathering in Paris

first_imgBrandi Morin APTN National NewsThe United Nations is paying for the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) to attend one of the most anticipated environmental conferences in history.Through the UN Development Programme, National Chief Perry Bellegarde and AFN NWT Regional Chief Bill Erasmus are confirmed to attend the COP 21 gathering in Paris.For months the AFN has been preparing to contribute to international talks on climate change.According to a statement from the AFN, the organization has been involved in a number of activities leading up to COP21,“And we will be there (in Paris) to raise our voices to ensure there is a real commitment to action and an approach that protects our lands and respects our rights.”There are just 34 days left until the start of the gathering in Paris where world leaders will come together to develop a strategy to combat the threat of climate change.According to COP21 officials, “for the first time in over 20 years of UN negotiations, aim to achieve a legally binding and universal agreement on climate.”Last July the AFN adopted a resolution specifically referencing COP21 that called on Canada and Member States along with UN agencies, funds and programmes to support Indigenous representation in Paris.According to the Liberal party, Prime Minister-designate Justin Trudeau plans to invite Indigenous leaders to join the Canadian delegation to Paris, however it’s not clear when the invitation will be sent out or who will be invited.Canada is scrambling to develop a strategy of its own to participate in the event.Green Party Leader Elizabeth May told APTN National News that Canada is not ready.She said the former Harper Conservative government allowed the issue to fall on the back burner.May said the last draft she saw of Canada’s negotiations for Paris were “awful, weak and not nearly enough of anything to deliver what the world needs.”May flew to Ottawa last week for a meeting with Trudeau.He has since invited Canada’s premiers and environmental leaders to join the Canadian delegation going to Paris as well as committing to a meeting with provincial leaders within 90 days of the UN event to follow up.The new Liberal government has said it plans to begin working on building a nation to nation relationship with Canada’s First Nations as well as adopting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).According to UNDRIP, industrial development activities that threaten the livelihood of Indigenous Peoples is a violation of Aboriginal and Treaty rights.Bellegarde said First Nations must be taken seriously on the issue of climate change.“First Nations must be part of dialogue and decision-making on climate change at all levels. Indigenous peoples are often the first to feel the effects of climate change and we have traditional knowledge that should inform the discussions and Indigenous rights must be respected in any plans and agreements.”bmorin@aptn.calast_img read more