Chico wrestling totals 9 pins in win over Corning

first_imgCorning >> The Chico High wrestling team may be sporting a new look, but it produced the same results. The Panthers defeated host Corning High 62-18 and totaled nine pins in a dual meet Wednesday night in the season opener. Chico, winners of the last seven Eastern Athletic League and Division II titles, entered sporting new two-piece doublets as uniforms. The attire wasn’t the only thing different as Chico also came in with a lineup featuring several new faces. “We really have a …last_img read more

Warriors HQ: Dubs ‘fell apart’ in final seconds of Game 2 vs. Clippers

first_img4:10: Warriors unveil … Beat writers Dieter Kurtenbach and Mark Medina review how the Warriors can “bounce back” from losing a stunning 31-point lead to the Los Angeles Clippers in Game 2 of their first round NBA playoffs series on Monday at Oracle Arena in Oakland.Here’s what you’ll hear in their latest podcast:1:00: Warriors have “made a habit of taking their foot off the accelerator.”2:10: Dubs lose DeMarcus Cousins to an injury, and lost the game because “they just imploded.”last_img read more

Astrobiology Survives on Passionate Hope

first_imgWithout the words ‘might’ and ‘could,’ astrobiologists would have nothing to say.Two decades since astrobiology became a ‘science,’ there is still no evidence for life beyond earth. That doesn’t discourage the true believers. With olympic fervor, they reach a perfect score—zero—for actual evidence supporting their belief.Oceans on Jupiter? Gas Giants Might Start Out As ‘Steam Worlds’ (Space.com). Jupiter might have been a steamy water world before it became a gas giant. It might have lasted long enough to be habitable. And if it were habitable, life could have evolved there. That’s a summary of this article by Jesse Emspak, contributing author to Space.com. Imagine anyone else proposing such face-free ideas and calling it science. But since John Chambers has a job as a scientist at the Carnegie Institution, he gets permission from Emspak to speculate freely and propagate his myths on this popular science news site.Water worlds could support life: Analysis challenges idea that life requires ‘Earth clone’ (Phys.org). Because Earth’s many life-friendly features form such an improbable combination, astrobiologists are motivated to expand the boundaries of habitability. This article does not rely on actual evidence. It relies on computer models, programmed by believers in astrobiology. Such models can be considered as reliable as those programmed by believers in astrology.The conditions for life surviving on planets entirely covered in water are more fluid than previously thought, opening up the possibility that water worlds could be habitable, according to a new paper from the University of Chicago and Pennsylvania State University.The scientific community has largely assumed that planets covered in a deep ocean would not support the cycling of minerals and gases that keeps the climate stable on Earth, and thus wouldn’t be friendly to life. But the study, published Aug. 30 in The Astrophysical Journal, found that ocean planets could stay in the “sweet spot” for habitability much longer than previously assumed. The authors based their findings on more than a thousand simulations.Did you previously think that? Did you previously assume that? Beware lest the bio-astrologers snare you in their tontological net.Carl Sagan standing by Viking model.Life on Mars? 40 Years Later, Viking Lander Scientist Still Says ‘Yes’ (Space.com). Background: in 1976, two NASA craft landed on Mars in two different places and ran 3 carefully-designed experiments to specifically search for life. Two of the three experiments gave negative results, but one, the ‘labeled-release experiment’ (LRE) was inconclusive. Most scientists concluded that abiological chemistry could explain the ‘fizzy’ results. The subsequent discovery of ubiquitous perchlorates supported the abiological interpretation. This highly optimistic article, though, squeezes the ambiguous result for all it’s worth, using the principal investigator of the LRE, Gilbert Levin, as principal cheerleader. He makes it seem that subsequent evidence for water under the ice caps of the red planet justifies his belief that Viking found life in the Martian soil. Like a modern-day P.T. Barnum, he touts his greatest show on Mars, with fingers drumming for NASA funds.Go to Sea with Astrobiologists Visiting Hawaii to Learn How to Look for Alien Life (Space.com). Astrobiologists are setting out to search for extraterrestrial life—in Hawaii! NASA is paying their way to use techniques that might come in handy some day for evaluating claims of life on other planets. Sounds like a fun job if you can get it. Amy Smith gets to study a seamount in the Pacific.She’s particularly interested in finding out whether any critters can use hydrogen as a source of energy, since that molecule can be found below the ice of Enceladus. In addition to studying microbes at the site, she’ll also take samples for genetic testing and gather specimens to try to grow in her lab. “Since this environment is similar to what we might find, we predict, on other ocean worlds, we’re hoping to get some answers as to what kinds of life might be there,” Smith said.Other scientists get to participate remotely with ‘telepresence’ to watch the fun. Your tax dollars at work, making it seem like astrobiology is real science, even if there is no evidence for it.Small Doses of RealityOmega Centauri Is a Terrible Place to Look for Habitable Planets (Space.com). Cross off globular clusters as pleasant nurseries for life, Nola Taylor Redd says. A big one, Omega Centauri, “probably doesn’t contain many habitable worlds, a new study suggests.” The problem? Neighboring stars would steal the water. This letdown applies to other similar clusters.Previous studies had suggested that a globular cluster might be the first place where intelligent life is identified in the galaxy. That’s because the roughly 150 clusters around the Milky Way are about 10 billion years old, with stars roughly the same age, giving life plenty of time to emerge and evolve.Unfortunately, the large but cozy environment of Omega Centauri works against hopes for habitability. Even compact planetary systems would struggle to exist in the core of the cluster, where stars lie an average of 0.16 light-years apart, the new study suggests.When the world is not enough: how to find another planet to live on  (The Conversation). Eamonn Kerins at the University of Manchester, an astrophysicist, tries to remain optimistic about space travel by humans to other planets, but he knows better than to upset facts. After relating the history of discovering exoplanets, and the prospects for better detection, he hits the brakes a little:There are of course many other factors beyond bulk planet characteristics that contribute critically to the success of evolved life here on Earth. The truth is that our descendents [sic] won’t know for sure that they’ve found Earth-2 until they try living on it. So, while we would not hand an empty map to our brave space explorers of the future, we are a long way from being able to guarantee them habitable accommodation.And, lets [sic] be clear, the long journey time even to our nearest exoplanet neighbour, Proxima b, means that it is definitely a one-way ticket. Indeed, with current technology, this journey would take tens of thousands of years.Then he remembers some other challenges for the poor wayfaring earthlings:During their voyage the astronauts also have to shield themselves from potentially fatal doses of cosmic rays. They must also avoid muscular and skeletal wasting, and cope with the psychological demands of being locked up for years in a large tin can. At their destination, they will also have to adjust to life as an alien without the advantages of evolutionary adaption [sic] that we enjoy on Earth. This is probably the greatest challenge of all.Oh well, it was fun to be optimistic for a few paragraphs. Should humans expect to colonize space? “All things considered,” he ends, “it’s one long journey for a man, one giant roll of the dice for mankind.”If Darwin skeptics ever presented theories this fact-free, their words would be mocked, trashed, and rejected. Oh wait; they are anyway, facts notwithstanding.(Visited 316 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Oyama Matomela flies South Africa’s friendly skies

first_imgCatch Oyama Matomela and other inspiring South Africans playing their part to build a strong South Africa in the Play Your Part TV series on Sundays at 9pm on SABC2. Matomela was born in 1991 in Port Elizabeth and it was there, in the friendly city, that her aunt would take her and her cousins to the Port Elizabeth International Airport to watch aircraft take off and land. • Brand South Africa +27 11 483 0122 info@brandsouthafrica.com • Ellis uses sport to build a better world • Ginwala helped shape South Africa’s history • Mam’ Khanyi rescues Hillbrow’s forgotten children • Graça Machel is a heroine in her own right • Bassie is a beauty with heartMelissa Jane CookAt just 23 years old Oyama Matomela is flying high as a female pilot in South Africa.Matomela was born in 1991 in Port Elizabeth and it was there, in the friendly city, that her aunt would take her and her cousins to the Port Elizabeth International Airport to watch aircraft take off and land.“These Sunday afternoon visits unveiled an incomparable passion and love for flying at a young age. Research and extensive hard work in my high school years led to me being awarded a bursary by the Department of Roads and Transport of the Eastern Cape to begin my flying training at the renowned 43 Air School [in Port Alfred],” she says.“I chose this career because it’s unlike any other. I’ve had these aspirations from a young age…” she says.The Collegiate Girls School alumnus is the fourth student to have been awarded the provincial department bursary, and the first woman.“The year and eight months I spent training was probably one of the most difficult yet rewarding things I have ever done,” she says. She adds: “The training was challenging and 110% effort was required – which is what I was willing to give to reach my goals at this age.”After passing her Private Pilot Licence (PPL), she later obtained an instrument-rated commercial pilot licence in August 2011. An instrument rating grants her licence to fly across international airspaces.Matomela passed the PPL in just 20 months; the average time to complete the course is between one and five years, depending on how frequently, and what aircraft, students fly, and in what weather.In March 2012 she wrote and passed all the airline transport pilot licence examinations, which then upgraded her licence to a frozen airline transport pilot licence. She commenced training towards a Grade III flight instructor rating in September 2012 and successfully completed the course in December 2012.Oyama Matomela on inspiring new waysMatomela then moved to Johannesburg in June 2013 to begin work as a flight instructor at Superior Pilot Services at Grand Central Airport in Midrand, where cadet pilots from South African Express airline are trained.A few months later she was invited for an interview with South African Express for a junior first officer position. The interview was successful and she joined the team in January 2013. She is currently training to fly the Bombardier Dash Q400 aircraft.Matomela hopes to earn a command on the jet fleet and become a training captain, and says her family, especially her mother, is proud of her accomplishments in such a male-dominated field. She gives special thanks to her mother, who she says “has been with her every step of the way throughout her training, in good and bad days”.last_img read more

Dropbox vs. Google Drive vs. Amazon vs. Skydrive: Which One Is Fastest?

first_imgCloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo… If my tests convinced me of anything, it is that Skydrive is a work in progress and has a long way to go. I even had trouble setting up the tests on Skydrive.My tests also revealed a number of odd results. When testing files saved from Word, strange extra files sometimes showed up on all the cloud drives except Dropbox. The file names always began with the characters “~$”. Sometimes the mystery files disappeared and sometimes they hung around.Cloud Drive RecommendationsSo here are some quick recommendations:First, do not treat your cloud drive as one huge dumping ground. Create folders and try to force a little organization on yourself.If you save a file to the cloud in order to work on it from another computer, quit the application or close the file on the first computer after you have saved the file to the cloud drive.Make sure you have a local copy of important files in your documents folder – not just the replicated cloud folder on your computer. Interesting things sometimes happen when cloud files get updated or deleted from another computer. When you come back to the computer where you first created a file, you could be in for a nasty surprise.If you cannot get a cloud folder on your computer to update, trying quitting the cloud application or rebooting your system.Dropbox and Amazon appear to be the most reliable solutions with only occasional delays. Google isn’t far behind, and I can’t imagine that Microsoft won’t work hard to improve Skydrive – the company’s subscription model depends on it.Even so, I have no plans to throw away my USB thumb drives. Fighting The Randomization FactorAfter running the tests a few times, I noticed what can only be described as random operating system differences. Sometimes the file would pop up first on my Mac and other times it showed up first on my Windows 7 laptop.In order to eliminate the operating system differences, I restarted the tests and this time stopped the timer when the file showed up on either my Mac running Mountain Lion or my Windows 7 laptop. I also reran my tests with a variety of sizes and types of files. In all I ran twenty-five sets of tests.The differences were significant, if not overwhelmingly huge. The fastest synchs took less than 3 seconds, while a few others took several minutes. The biggest chunk of tests clocked in between 10 seconds and one minute. A few synchs never completed. But which service recorded the best times with the fewest problems? david sobotta Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Related Posts Tags:#Amazon#Cloud Providers#cloud service providers#cloud storage#Dropbox#google drive#Microsoft Dropbox FTW!Dropbox ended up being fastest 56% of the time. Even more importantly, it was slowest only 4% of the time.Skydrive brought up the rear. It was fastest on 12% of the tests, but but slowest on a whopping 80% of the tests. It also had two files that never showed up on the Mac and one that never showed on the Windows 7 laptop.The Amazon Cloud slightly outpaced Google Drive – which had one file that never showed up on the Mac and another that took a very long time to complete. How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud As cloud computing services become ever more popular, you might begin to wonder how much you can really trust them to perform when you need them? I decided to find out – by testing the top file-transfer/file-storage/file-backup services.In many ways, getting a file from one computer to multiple computers is the most challenging task for the cloud. And because I like to use multiple computers running multiple operating systems, including Linux, Windows and the Mac, that function is particularly important to me.Cloud Services Can LagI am pretty agnostic when it comes to cloud providers – as long as they are free or close to it. However, as I was moving files around while preparing my most recent book A Week at the Beach The 2013 Emerald Isle Travel Guide I was a little surprised at the lags I sometimes experienced using the big-name cloud-based file-transfer services.More than once when I wanted to use a file from one computer to another, I was disappointed by my cloud services. There were a few times that I got so tired of waiting for a file to show up on my other computer’s cloud drive that I resorted to sneakernet using a USB thumb drive.After my book was published, I decided to go back and run some simple tests to see just how long the four best-known file-transfer/backup services actually take to put the files where you want them.To compare Dropbox, Google Drive, Amazon Cloud, and Microsoft’s SkyDrive I started by exporting a 500K JPEG test image from Lightroom on my Windows 8 computer directly to each of the four services.last_img read more