BONNER COULD BE ABOUT TO DON A DONEGAL JERSEY AGAIN

first_imgCiaran Bonner could be about to make a dramatic return to the Donegal GAA team.Bonner, 26, has been out in the wilderness since the summer of 2009 when he was dropped by former county manager John Joe Doherty for a breach of discipline.Now the Glenswilly man, who helped his club to their first senior county championship last Sunday, admits he would love the chance to play for new manager Jim McGuinness. “It’s always a privilege to play for your county,” he said. “Nobody is ever going to close the door on that until you’re just not able to play any more.”It was claimed he refused to return to the panel this year, but Bonner insists he has had no contact with any of the Donegal management team.“Despite what peopled said, I didn’t get a phone call this year. Everyone said I refused to play but that’s not the case.“I didn’t get a phone call and to be quite honest I don’t expect to get one this year. “That is up to Jim McGuinness. There’s fabulous footballers in this county.”While he is unsure of his own inter-county future, Bonner has urged McGuinness and his selector Rory Gallagher to take a closer look at his Glenswilly clubmate Gary McFadden.“There’s a few people there they should look at, they need to take a look at Copper.“He was up at a trial last year and scored 1-6 in 30 minutes and didn’t even get as much as a phone call.”Ends BONNER COULD BE ABOUT TO DON A DONEGAL JERSEY AGAIN was last modified: October 4th, 2011 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Ciaran BonnerglenswillyJim McGuinnesslast_img read more

Funeral arrangements for late Tir Chonaill Gaels member Vince Keating

first_imgTir Chonaill Gaels GAA News: Vince Keating – RIP- Funeral ArrangementsFuneral will take place on Friday 25th November – 1 p.m. at Our Lady of the Visitation Church, 358 Greenford Road, Greenford, Middlesex, UB6 9AN Burial  – 2.30 p.m. at Greenford Cemetry.Funeral Reception afterwards at Tir Chonaill Gaels Clubhouse, Berkeley Avenue, Greenford, UB6 0NZFuneral arrangements for late Tir Chonaill Gaels member Vince Keating was last modified: November 21st, 2016 by Mark ForkerShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GAASportTir Chonaill Gaelslast_img read more

Burton v QPR: Taarabt plays

first_imgAdel Taarabt is included in a much-changed but experienced QPR side to face Burton in the second round of the Capital One Cup – his first appearance for Rangers since May 2013. Burton: McLaughlin, Edwards, Cansdell-Sherriff, Mousinho, Taft, Sharps, MacDonald, Knowles, McGurk, Palmer, Harness. Subs: Lyness, McFadzean, Bell, Weir, Beavon, Blyth, Slade. QPR: Murphy, Simpson, Onuoha, Dunne, Hill, Henry, Faurlin, Wright-Phillips, Hoilett, Taarabt, Phillips.  Subs: Green, Fer, Mutch, Zamora, Ehmer, Doughty, Harriman.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

A familiar voice from home

first_imgKhanyi MagubaneI’ve always wondered, what’s the difference between us fairly unsophisticated natives of the third world, seemingly deprived of the illumination, the better way of life enjoyed by those in the first world? Perturbed by thoughts of missing out on something potentially good, I concluded, this first world I must see and experience for myself.So off I went to America for a frenzied two-week holiday. After 20 hours of travelling, I finally arrived in New York, my first destination in this fact-finding mission. The day I arrived also happened to be the start of a heat wave in the eastern parts of the country, including New York, one of the worst-hit states.In my oblivious state I stepped out of the well air-conditioned JFK and was suddenly struck by invisible flames of pure heat. I felt like Hell’s Kitchen was no longer just a neighbourhood in Manhattan, but the whole city had transformed into a furnace.I was still dressed in my winter clothes and I was starting to boil. But, never one to be defeated or outdone by life’s challenges, I decided to venture out – with no luggage in hand (the airline lost it). I was armed with just a map of the subway train system running through the city, my passport and some dollars.I needed to head out to Brooklyn, my home for the next five days in the Big Apple. After a kind Samaritan showed me how to read the map and the different routes, I waited for the train. Eight minutes was all I was going to wait. This is good, I thought. This trip had finally begun.Fast-forward to a week and a half and two states (New York and Michigan) later, I am now in Boston, Massachusetts, having lunch with my sister, her best friend and our cousin, who is a professor at Boston College. That’s when I notice something odd. The people at the table next to ours kept glancing in our direction. Through the corner of my eye I could see this lady’s eye constantly on me. Stolen glances became blatant stares. Eventually I voice what was now becoming an uncomfortable experience with the rest of the table.No sooner had I spoken out about the lady staring at me, she glides over, beaming from ear to ear. Wearing a cotton shift dress, hair perfectly set, manicured nails, expensive-looking jewelry, not too much, but enough for you to know she was old money. What in the good heavens did this woman think we had in common?Maybe she mistook me for someone she knew. I would tell her that I’m not American, that I’m South African and she would apologise for thinking I was somebody else. I would courteously accept her apology and tell her that it happens to the best of us, she would return to her table, and I would continue my lunch with my family. I had it all figured out by the time she arrived at my table, “Excuse me, are you guys from South Africa?” She asked with all the enthusiasm she could muster in that one sentence. I couldn’t disappoint her effort, so in my equally spirited response I affirmed her suspicions.Her joy was unmistakable. She told me that she had been listening to us talking, as she thought that she recognised the distinctive South African accent. She happened to be sitting at the table with another South African woman, who was in the country to market African crafts and other hand-made home décor made by rural women in KwaZulu-Natal. She introduced herself. She was Veronica Castellucci.Veronica, an interior decorator, is a South African who arrived in America in 1980 after she married an Italian who swept her off her feet in a whirlwind romance. She had not met many South Africans during her stay in America, and often felt lonely and homesick. She recalled a story of how, when she was young and pregnant with her first child, she was walking down a street when she thought she had heard a familiar accent. Filled with the familiar excitement she displayed to me, she approached the lady, who, after admitting she was a South African, coldly dismissed her. Veronica walked away with her tail between her legs.That was over 20 years ago. Now a resident of Wellesley, one of the richest suburbs in all of America I’m told, she’s doing well for herself. Her husband is a successful businessman with a passion for wine, and she’s an interior decorator who loves what she does for a living. Yet I suspect there’s always been a part of her that’s always longed for her people.Without further delay, the whole lot of us are immediately invited to Veronica’s for breakfast the next day. It turns out she only stays 10 minutes away from my cousin’s home. After about 20 minutes of a purely coincidental reunion, we part ways. I feel excited and rejuvenated by her love for South Africa, even though she’s been away for so long.I smile to myself when I think about the fact that in 1980 she, a white South African, and I, a black South African, would have never been able to sit and eat at the same restaurant, never mind receive an invitation to be guests at her table, because the political climate would have surely prevented our paths crossing. But here we are in 2008, in a land foreign to both of us, and we are able to have that interaction, because we both knew that we were now a different people.Breakfast at Veronica’s was splendid. The conversation was easy and natural, unforced. It was clear that she had gone to great lengths to prepare a special feast for her new South African friends. She invited her best friend and neighbour to share in the occasion and, well, that moment it was a slice of life I knew I would never taste twice, but would always hold dear.After countless hugs and promises to keep in touch, I realised, leaving Veronica’s house that morning, that being a South African was something that never leaves you, no matter how long one maybe away from home, you can always recognise your own, reconnect and make family – and it doesn’t hurt that they are filthy rich too!Go to the MediaClub weekly columns home pageKhanyi Magubane is a journalist, published poet, radio broadcaster and fiction writer. She writes for MediaClubSouth Africa, and brings with her an eclectic mix of media experience. She’s worked as a radio journalist for stations including Talk Radio &702 and the youth station YFM, where she was also a news anchor. She’s been a contributing features writer in a number of magazines titles including O magazine and Y mag. She’s also a book reviewer and literary essayist, published in the literary journal Wordsetc. Magubane is also a radio presenter at SAfm, where she hosts a Sunday show. She’s currently also in the process of completing the manuscript of her first novel, an extract of which has been published in Wordsetc.last_img read more

Mike Machat

first_imgMike Machat’s passion and knowledge for aviation is bettered by few. Pilot, author, artist, photographer, editor and commentator, Mike has done it all and then some. As the nephew of the chief engineer for Republic Aviation Corporation, he was inspired to his aviation career at an early age. Model building and endless hours sketching planes at New York airports gave way to flying, and he earned his private and commercial pilot licenses.Mike served in the U.S. Air Force and with the National Security Agency in Washington DC. After relocating to Los Angeles, he earned a Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from California State University, Long Beach, and was hired by the Douglas Aircraft Company as a technical illustrator. There, he quickly advanced through the ranks to become Staff Artist and Corporate Representative for the McDonnell Douglas Corporation.Moving on from the corporate world, Mike established his own independent aviation art studio and was elected first president of the American Society of Aviation Artists (ASAA). He also became a senior, flight-rated, member of the Air Force Art Program, contributing 21 original paintings to the national collection. His aviation artwork has won numerous national and international awards, and is displayed in many museums and airline headquarters.As an aviator, Mike has flown in more than 200 different types of aircraft, and every type of airliner from Ford Tri-Motor to Concorde. He has flown with NASA, the Blue Angels, and the USAF Test Pilot School, and was the first Air Force Artist to fly in the Rockwell B-1B Lancer and Grumman F-14 Tomcat in a U.S. Navy exchange program. An avid glider pilot, Mike has logged more than 2,100 flights in sailplanes.In 2001, Mike expanded his career to include writing and served as Editor-in-Chief for Wings & Airpower magazine as well as Acquisitions Editor for Specialty Press Aviation Publications. He has authored two best-selling books and countless magazine and website articles, and has contributed to another 25 books. Mike brings a wealth of editorial and literary knowledge to all of his aviation endeavors.Contact:Airline Ratings PTY Ltd.Newspaper House, 50 Hasler Rd.Osborne Park, 6017Western AustraliaPhone: +61 41 7936610Email:mike.machat@airlineratings.comlast_img read more

Innovative theatre for young minds

first_img15 June 2012 The African Research and Educational Puppetry Programme Trust, or arepp:Theatre for Life, is adding some spark to life skills education in South African schools, using humour and music in its interactive performances to demystify taboo subjects and enabling young people to make informed lifestyle choices. There is a great sense of orderliness ahead of arepp’s performance at the Rhodesfield Technical High School on Johannesburg’s West Rand. The familiar sound of the school bell signals the end of each lesson, prompting pupils to walk briskly along the corridors to their next class, and in the reception area there is serious talk of reports, averages, tests and results. But as soon as the play starts, the school hall – with a group of about 300 grade eight pupils neatly seated in rows on the floor – explodes with laughter, whistling and cheering. Even the teachers who are supervising the noisy group of teenagers can’t help but smile. The performance that follows will undoubtedly be the highlight of every pupil’s day. Targeted at grades eight to 12 pupils, the focus of the Look Before You Leap play series is on choices, problem solving and self-image. It explores how ideas of gender and sexuality affect perceptions of self and society. Arepp’s approach to educational theatre is all about making learning fun and, through the different characters, help pupils make an emotional connection with the content of the play. The award-winning educational theatre group takes learning out of the classroom onto the stage, and there is nothing high-brow about these performances. Instead of sidestepping the serious issues affecting young people in South Africa, arepp’s candid approach and innovative use of theatre highlights difficult social and personal issues such as sexuality, relationships, pregnancy, substance use, HIV/Aids, physical and emotional abuse and gender equality.Learning can be fun Brigid Schutz, director at arepp, says the structure and character development of the plays help pupils to identify closely with the situations portrayed. Unlike traditional theatre, the audience are not passive observers, as the play mirrors their personal experiences on stage. One of the actors, Ruan Zed, says that theatre is a powerful medium that helps people to see issues from a different perspective. “Theatre puts your own life story on stage,” he says. This particular play, Look Before You Leap: Oh Yeah! deals with issues that all high school pupils can relate to – peer pressure and temptation, not fitting in and being different. It also examines the uncertainty of early relationships, being true to one’s identity and self-esteem. “The characters in the play go through an emotional process and because it becomes a personal experience for the pupils, they can identify and connect with it,” Schutz explains.Making life orientation relevant The productions, which run for an hour – the first half is the play, which is then followed by a 30-minute problem-solving discussion with the audience – are specifically designed to be performed as a life orientation (LO) lesson within the school’s daily schedule. LO is a compulsory subject in South African schools for all grades. This new area of learning replaced subjects such as career guidance, physical training and religious education. The point of LO is to enable pupils to make wise choices, understand healthy living, get career direction, learn study skills and become aware of environmental, community and society issues. Although it covers non-academic skills needed in life, Rhodesfield’s LO teacher Elliot Faku says there is a perception in schools that LO is not as important as the more academic subjects like maths or science. “The subject is highly relevant as it deals with what life is like after school,” he says. He is a great supporter of using theatre as a learning tool. “It further entrenches the concepts that the pupils learn in class,” Faku says. “Even though the kids see it as a break from their normal school routine, they are still learning.”Problem-solving through discussion After each performance pupils have an opportunity to ask questions, talk about the issues raised in the play, contextualise the content and debate the decisions made by the characters. The discussion time is important because it encourages open communication. “It shows the pupils that their opinions are valued,” Schutz says. Most of them are not scared to ask difficult questions that they might not usually want to discuss with other adults such as their parents or teachers. Throughout the discussion, the group is encouraged to offer answers themselves, which builds confidence and problem-solving skills. Zed notes that in all the discussion sessions they’ve noticed that the questions and opinions of the pupils are closely related to their own lives. By sharing their understanding of the issues, pupils become more confident to talk about them in the classroom, on the playground and at home. “Arepp doesn’t give right or wrong answers,” he says. “What we want to do is develop resilient youth who can deal with any challenge and know what they stand for,” Zed says.Reaching as many kids as possible Arepp’s life skills and self-efficacy development programmes reach all age groups in schools with four series of shows: Look Before you Leap, aimed at groups between 13 and 22; About Us for 10 to 13 year olds; No Monkey Business and the Monkey Tales series for the groups between six and nine and three and five respectively. “There is a need to do more of this type of theatre in South Africa,” Schutz says. “There are many theatre education initiatives that start up, but keeping it going is difficult because it is very costly.” The organisation relies entirely on external funding to continue its work. Currently it receives support from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, the STARS Foundation and a foreign donor agency in the Netherlands. Established in 1987, arepp reaches about 120 000 pupils between the ages of five and 18 in 350 schools each year. Feedback from teachers last year showed an increase of 81% in the audience’s knowledge, skills, ability and confidence to deal with issues directly affecting them. The reported percentage of physical and sexual abuse cases in those schools halved from the previous year, to just under 4%, and reported pregnancies declined from 9% to less than 1%. Reported suicides decreased and overall, 80% of audiences indicated changes in their feelings of worth, competency and control with regard to the issues presented in the plays. “This shows that our performances are helping to make a difference,” says Schutz. Last year the company was selected from 976 applicants from 60 countries to receive the 2011 STARS Foundation Impact award in education. The foundation offers awards to charities in the Africa-Middle East and Asia-Pacific regions working with children in the areas of health, education and protection. The award is allowing arepp to fund additional theatre projects and perform about 200 more presentations, which will benefit 30 000 additional pupils. Schutz describes the award as an important accolade as it validates the organisation’s work and recognises arepp’s contribution of 25 years to the promotion of human rights in South Africa. “It highlights the vital importance of assisting young people and children to understand, engage with, and contextualise the notions and practical applications of their rights,” she says. Edited version of photograph by Andrew Aitchison, reproduced with kind permission. Article first published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Dean Foods initiates voluntary reorganization

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest This week, Dean Foods Company announced that it and substantially all of its subsidiaries have initiated voluntary Chapter 11 reorganization proceedings in the Southern District of Texas. The Company intends to use this process to protect and support its ongoing business operations and address debt and unfunded pension obligations while it works toward an orderly and efficient sale of the Company.Dean Foods also announced that it is engaged in advanced discussions with Dairy Farmers of America, Inc. (DFA) regarding a potential sale of substantially all assets of the Company. If the parties ultimately reach agreement on the terms of a sale, such transaction would be subject to regulatory approval and would be subject to higher or otherwise better offers in the bankruptcy.Dean Foods is operating in the ordinary course of business and remains focused on providing its customers with wholesome, great-tasting dairy products and the highest levels of quality, service and value. The Company has received a commitment of approximately $850 million in debtor-in-possession (DIP) financing from certain of its existing lenders, led by Rabobank. Following court approval, the Company expects to use the DIP financing, together with cash on hand and operating cash flows, to support its continued operation throughout this process, including payment of employee wages and benefits without interruption and payment to suppliers and vendors in full under normal terms for goods and services provided on or after the filing date.“The actions we are announcing today are designed to enable us to continue serving our customers and operating as normal as we work toward the sale of our business,” said Eric Beringause, who recently joined Dean Foods as president and CEO. “We have a strong operational footprint and distribution network, a robust portfolio of leading national brands and extensive private label capabilities, all supported by approximately 15,000 dedicated employees around the country. Despite our best efforts to make our business more agile and cost-efficient, we continue to be impacted by a challenging operating environment marked by continuing declines in consumer milk consumption. Importantly, we are continuing to provide customers with an uninterrupted supply of high-quality dairy products, as well as supporting our dairy suppliers and other partners.”Beringause joined the company just over three months ago.“I’ve taken a hard look at our challenges, as well as our opportunities, and truly believe we are taking the best path forward. In recent months, we have put in place a new senior management team that not only has considerable experience in the dairy and consumer product industries, but also in executing major turnarounds,” he said. “I am confident we have the right people in place to lead us through this process.”In conjunction with the court-supervised process, Dean Foods has filed a number of customary motions seeking court authorization to continue to support its business operations. The Company expects to receive court approval for all of these requests. The Company also intends to file bidding procedures with the court to conduct a sale in accordance with Section 363 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and work with its creditors to explore a potential stand-alone plan of reorganization.Additional information is available on the restructuring page of the Company’s website, www.DeanFoodsRestructuring.com.last_img read more

After plaguing Congress-NCP, ‘defection fever’ grips smaller parties

first_imgAfter a slew of defections from the Nationalist Congress Party (NCP) and the Congress ahead of the Assembly elections, now smaller parties like the Raju Shetti-led Swabhimani Paksha and Prakash Ambedkar’s Vanchit Bahujan Aghadi (VBA) have started losing key leaders.In a major setback to Mr. Shetti on Thursday, his right-hand man, Ravikant Tupkar, resigned from the Swabhimani Paksha. Mr. Tupkar, a mainstay of the party and one of its rising stars, is said to be joining the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) soon. His move has prompted the Swabhimani Paksha leadership to urge Mr. Shetti to step into the poll arena himself. Mr. Shetti told The Hindu on Friday, “[Mr. Tupkar] spoke to me yesterday and said he was taking this decision as he saw no future in our party. While his loss is undeniable as he was a good spokesperson who had come up from our farmers’ movement, none of his supporters have left our party.” Mr. Shetti had been resting his hopes on Mr. Tupkar to deliver the goods in Buldhana district, where the latter is said to have a strong following. In fact, prior to the Lok Sabha elections, Mr. Shetti had asked for the Buldhana Lok Sabha seat from the Congress-NCP with the objective of fielding Mr. Tupkar.At the time, NCP chief Sharad Pawar had persuaded Mr. Shetti to settle for another seat (eventually, the Sangli seat) while promising to back Mr. Tupkar for a seat in either house of the State legislature. Since his upset loss in the Lok Sabha elections, Mr. Shetti has focused on rebuilding his party and said he is not interested in contesting the Assembly polls. However, after Mr. Tupkar’s resignation, Mr. Shetti is mulling contesting the polls to rally his crumbling party. “I will announce my decision within two days,” he told The Hindu.Meanwhile, the VBA suffered a jolt after its spokesperson, Gopichand Padalkar, an influential Dhangar leader from Sangli district, recently resigned as the party’s general secretary.Mr. Ambedkar had inducted Mr. Padalkar, a former BJP leader with a deep affiliation to the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, into the VBA. The move had raised eyebrows owing to Mr. Padalkar’s close association with Sambhaji Bhide ‘Guruji’, whose name had surfaced in connection with the Bhima-Koregaon violence.Mr. Padalkar had contested from the Sangli Lok Sabha seat on a VBA ticket, polling three lakh votes and affirming his hold over the Dhangar community. However, he changed his stripes soon after the conclusion of the Lok Sabha polls and is likely to rejoin the BJP.At a recent meeting with his followers, he said, “[The BJP-led government] is the first administration since Independence to attempt to do something for the welfare of the Dhangars. The other parties do not care anything for the needs of our community.”last_img read more

Gilas gets blown out by Lebanon, drops to battle for 7th

first_imgRead Next Lebanon’s naturalized big man Norvel Pelle also gave the Filipinos’ fits, dominating the paint on both ends with 23 points, 13 rebounds and nine blocks.Gilas, which sorely missed the services of Fil-German Christian Standhardinger, faces Jordan on Monday in a duel for seventh place.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutTerrence Romeo paced the Philippines in scoring with 19 points, most of which came in the fourth quarter where the game was already decided.Frustrations mounted for Gilas late with head coach Chot Reyes getting tossed midway through the final frame. 29th SEA Games officially open in Kuala Lumpur Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. MOST READ Photo from Fiba.comGilas Pilipinas’ woes continued as it suffered a second straight beating this time, at the hands of Lebanon, 106-87, in the classification phase of the 2017 Fiba Asia Cup Sunday night at Nouhad Nawfal Stadium in Beirut, Lebanon.Fadi El Khatib led the Lebanese’ wire-to-wire win with a tournament-high 36 points.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chiefcenter_img Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games After going undefeated in the group stages, Gilas’ campaign took a turn for the worse following a blowout loss to fierce rival South Korea in the quarterfinals on Wednesday. WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding Flags of SEA Games countries raised at Athletes Village Man sworn in as lawyer by judge who sentenced him to prison as a teen 20 years ago LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses View commentslast_img read more

Jazul, Fuel Masters confident of smooth transition under Alas

first_img“I feel younger,” he said. “Since college, we’ve been together and that continued in Alaska.”Jazul has every reason to feel upbeat. After all, his partnership with Alas allowed him to be a part of the Knights squad which won the NCAA title back in 2005, while also a key factor in the Aces’ Finals appearances in the past three years.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“We’re all positive here, I know what coach Louie and the coaching staff can do for us,” he said.But with the familiarity also comes responsibility as Jazul will be counted on to make the Fuel Masters’ transition under Alas easier. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netIf there’s someone in Phoenix who knows how great of a coach Louie Alas is, it’s RJ Jazul.Sharing a bond since their days in Letran, the 31-year-old couldn’t help but wax nostalgic over his history with the soft-spoken mentor, whom he has reunited with at the Fuel Masters.ADVERTISEMENT Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Read Next ‘Arthur’ producer wants LeBron to appear on the show after viral meme US transit worker saves man who fell on rail track PLAY LIST 01:44US transit worker saves man who fell on rail track00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort However, the 5-foot-11 sharpshooter said that the burden should fall on every player in the Fuel Masters roster to fulfill their roles in the new system Alas will implement.“It’s now up to us. Whoever coach you put in, if the players won’t follow, the success wouldn’t come. So we all have to buy-in to the system of coach Louie,” he said.Pressured as Phoenix is to turn things around after a rather lackluster showing last season, Jazul is just keeping the faith on Alas and his teammates as the Fuel Masters prepare for a turnaround conference starting this upcoming 2018 Philippine Cup.“Since I got traded here in Phoenix, I always had that pressure because it’s expected that the team will do good,” he said. “Now that coach Louie is here, it’s still the same. But it’s up to us as a team to deal with it and hopefully in the coming weeks, we’ll figure out where we’ll end up.”ADVERTISEMENT Kris Aquino ‘pretty chill about becoming irrelevant’ Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasacenter_img Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 LATEST STORIES Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more