Northern Power move will cost jobs

first_imgDISTRIBUTED ENERGY COMBINING NORTHERN POWER & PROTON ENERGYTO STRENGTHEN OPERATIONS, REDUCE COSTWALLINGFORD, CT, January 31, 2007 — Distributed Energy Systems Corp. (NASDAQ: DESC), today announced it will combine its two subsidiaries Northern Power Systems and Proton Energy Systems — to reduce cost and strengthen systems sales, engineering, production, service and technology development.The company, which creates and delivers products and solutions for the decentralized energy marketplace, said the reorganization will result in a charge against 2007s first-quarter results of approximately $1.0 million, or $0.03 per share, to account for staff reductions, reflecting the elimination of about 60 jobs, or 20% of the workforce, and related expenses. The reorganization is estimated to result in savings of approximately $4-$5 million, on an annualized basis, beginning in the second quarter of 2007. In addition, the Waitsfield, VT, location will be closed, and its activities moved to the companys 110,000-square-foot Barre, VT facility.During the past year, it became increasingly clear that we would benefit going forward by implementing our strategy now, to become a one-company organization, said Ambrose L. Schwallie, Distributed Energys chief executive officer. We expect these changes to improve sales and marketing effectiveness, reduce costs, enhance efficiencies of our systems engineering, products and service capabilities, and enable more and better cross-fertilization in advanced technology development.This new functional structure, Mr. Schwallie continued, allows us to focus more precisely on the markets, critical business drivers and capabilities that give Distributed Energy the best prospects for the higher-margin revenues we need to foster strong, sustained, profitable growth. Taking this action promptly will, we believe, enable the company to make better progress toward our goal of reaching profitability.Markets and OrganizationDiscussing the reorganization further, the Distributed Energy CEO cited the companys emphasis on power generation and power electronics systems, systems engineering and combined heat-and-power projects, products and services for oil and gas exploration markets, larger-scale wind projects for power generation, and commercial hydrogen, renewable fuels, and waste-to-energy technologies.To implement the reorganization, Mr. Schwallie also announced the appointment of three senior vice presidents to company-wide functional positions, all reporting to him:”Mark Murray now leads the sales and marketing functions for all of Distributed Energy products, systems and services. Mr. Murray most recently headed the companys commercial hydrogen business.”Betsy Anderson assumes responsibility for all of the companys engineering, production, project management and service activities, expanding her prior operating responsibilities beyond energy systems, products and services.”Robert Friedland takes on management duties encompassing all technology innovation, including the hydrogen research and development programs that he previously ran.Under their experienced leadership, Mr. Schwallie said, the company will work to strengthen lines of communication and operating efficiencies within the company, improve our impact in the marketplace, and continue to pursue the ideas and technologies that can enable Distributed Energy to be one of the leaders in alternative and renewable energy solutions.Mr. Schwallie concluded: This new unified focus should begin to be reflected in 2007 operating results. We believe this new, revitalized organization will put Distributed Energy in a stronger position to drive improved operating margins, and better serve markets where our capabilities and business models deliver valuable benefits to customers, now and in the years ahead.About Distributed Energy Systems Corp.Distributed Energy Systems Corp. (NASDAQ: DESC) creates and delivers products and solutions to the emerging decentralized energy marketplace, giving users greater control over their energy cost, quality and reliability. The company delivers a combination of practical, ready-today energy solutions and the solid business platforms for capitalizing on the changing energy landscape. For more information visit http://www.distributed-energy.com(link is external).last_img read more

Egyptian students talk about protests

first_imgWhen photos of the protests in Cairo’s Tahrir Square hit the media, America was introduced to a muddled collection of images — an endless sea of people, spurts of fire and the foreign scribble of Arabic writing. Initially, it wasn’t clear what was going on, especially as Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s regime tried to tighten its grip on what the rest of the world saw, temporarily shutting down the Internet and discouraging journalists from doing their jobs.Reflection · Hassan Ghozlan, a graduate student studying engineering, looks through photos and news clips from his war-torn country, Egypt. – Stephanie Guo | Daily Trojan But to engineering Ph.D. student Hassan Ghozlan, an Egyptian citizen who came to the United States for the first time in Fall 2009 to attend the Viterbi School of Engineering, the pictures were personal. They showed the square just across the Nile from his home, the place where a month ago he bought novels from a bookstore in the square.And for freshman Richard Sidhom, whose family left Egypt and came to the United States when he was nine years old, the protesters in the streets of Alexandria, Sidhom’s birthplace, were cousins, distant relatives and friends that he had left behind.The protests, which have been going on since Jan. 25, represent to Ghozlan and Sidhom a power struggle between Mubarak’s regime and the masses of average Egyptians who have been suffering for too long under Mubarak’s rule.“It was not religious, it was not an Islamic uprising,” Ghozlan said. “It’s just people: engineers, university professors, doctors, average people. It was the youth, and that’s why it has hope to be successful.”Both Ghozlan and Sidhom were raised under Mubarak’s rule and taught from a young age to refrain from speaking out in order to protect themselves — never to get into a fight or walk into a protest or hold a sign. Ghozlan compares Mubarak’s 30-year rule to that of Big Brother in George Orwell’s 1984.It was always never do this, never do that, especially for Sidhom, who is a Coptic Catholic, a minority in Egypt.But according to Ghozlan, the current protests transcend religious differences. To him they represent good, middle-class Egyptians standing up against a certain evil that has overstayed his welcome as their ruler.“[Religion] is the card the [Mubarak] regime plays to the West — it’s either me, or the Muslim Brotherhood and the extremists,” Ghozlan said. “And people buy that.”This isn’t the only issue Ghozlan feels Mubarak has swept under the rug. He believes that, over the last 10 or 15 years in particular, the regime has been a sham, featuring acts of deceit, corruption and oppression.Videos have been leaked of Egyptian Parliament members being told how to vote and not being able to do otherwise. A Mubarak opponent trying to run for the presidency was sentenced to prison on counts of forgery. A ferry boat unfit for use sank in the waters of the Red Sea, drowning more than 1,300 Egyptians. These and thousands of other acts have seemed to go unpunished — until now.“You don’t see what’s going under the carpet,” Ghozlan said. “People are boiling, people are mistreated, the regime is oppressive.”This dynamic can be seen in the photos recently released. In one, an anti-Mubarak protester sits in the square holding a sign written in Arabic that translates to “Come on Hosni! I need to go home to grade the exams,” while in another, members of Mubarak’s National Democratic Party barge through the crowds on horse and camelback, a sight Ghozlan hadn’t seen in the square in the 25 years he lived in Cairo.It is acts like these that lead Ghozlan to believe Mubarak cannot be trusted. Whether right now or in eight months, when the national elections are planned to take place. Ghozlan supports an immediate transfer of power, though he doesn’t think Mubarak needs to be exiled from Egypt for this to be successful.Sidhom, on the other hand, is not quite as convinced. As a Coptic, he is somewhat wary of the Muslim Brotherhood taking over, and believes that if this occurs, it could cause problems for Egyptian Coptics. The worst-case scenario would be a Coptic diaspora from Egypt, according to Sidhom. But above all, he wants what is best for Egypt as a whole.“What I’ve been noticing is on one hand, you have some people who are taking advantage of the chaos to act out these anti-Coptic feelings,” Sidhom said. “But on the other hand you have a lot of people who right now are saying, ‘We’re not Coptics and Muslims; we’re all Egyptians.’”This nationalistic mentality can be seen both in the heart of Tahrir Square and thousands of miles away in Los Angeles, where Ghozlan and Sidhom can openly voice their opinions about Mubarak and what they see fit for the future of Egypt.“It’s when one looks at the world and sees democracy and sees how things are run in democratic countries that he realizes how cruel it is to live in such a society,” Ghozlan said.For more stories on the crisis in Egypt, click here.last_img read more

16th Annual Northern Classic taking over the NPCC tomorrow

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. — Over 90 bodybuilders are getting ready to take the stage at the North Peace Cultural Centre on Saturday for the 16th Annual Northern Classic bodybuilding and fitness competition.The event will see contestants competing for a chance to head to Vancouver for the BC Amateur Bodybuilding Association provincial championships in three weeks’ time. Northern Classic organiser Jeni Briscoe says that this year’s Northern Classic has fewer contestants than last year’s record number of 120 participants, though that’s largely due to the BCABA having more shows for contestants to qualify for provincials. “It’s kind of nicer to have smaller shows,” said Briscoe. “They can go really long. Some of them, were getting up to two or three hundred people. Ninety’s a nice number, we’ll be done by 10 instead of midnight.” Fort St. John native and IFBB Pro Debbie Clarke at a bodybuilding competition. Supplied photo. Fort St. John native and IFBB Pro Debbie Clarke at a bodybuilding competition. Supplied photo. Fort St. John native and IFBB Pro Debbie Clarke at a bodybuilding competition. Supplied photo. Fort St. John native and IFBB Pro Debbie Clarke at a bodybuilding competition. Supplied photo. – Advertisement -This year, Briscoe says that the show will have a more local feel, with Fort St. John native and IFBB Pro and fitness pro Debbie Clarke as this year’s guest poser at the main show, which takes place at 6:00 p.m. Saturday. Clarke has been competing in bodybuilding for 10 years, and currently trains at Today’s Techniques.Briscoe says that tickets are still available for both shows as of Friday afternoon. Tickets are $32.50 for the morning show, and $57.50 for the evening main event, and are available at Today’s Techniques.last_img read more

Star responds to suit by former Lohan bodyguard

first_imgA $1 million demand by Lindsay Lohan’s former bodyguard for the mistaken use of his photo in a Star magazine article about the actress is “wildly excessive,” the publication’s editor-in-chief said today. Andrae Renard sued the magazine’s parent company, American Media Inc. of Boca Raton, Fla., in Los Angeles Superior Court, alleging libel, intentional infliction of emotional distress and negligence. “As soon as Star was notified that we identified the wrong bodyguard in the photo caption …. Star immediately withdrew the article from its Web site and corrected, retracted and apologized for the error,” Editor-in-Chief Candace Trunzo said. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREPettersson scores another winner, Canucks beat KingsAccording to Renard’s court papers, a photo of him with the actress was used in connection with a July 25 Star article headlined “Lindsay’s Bodyguard Bares All! Her Sick Secret World.” The caption under the photo identified Renard as Lee Weaver, the bodyguard who is the subject of the story, according to the suit filed Friday. Since the story and his photo appeared, colleagues and other celebrity clients have questioned Renard’s credibility and he has been banned from entering “certain elite Hollywood nightclubs,” according to his court papers. Renard also is worried he might lose his current job as a Hollywood nightclub security guard because his boss does not “wish to associate with the negative publicity that this article has generated …,” according to the suit. For more news and observations about crime in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, check out the Daily News’ crime blog by clicking here.last_img read more