New transmission line could boost solar in Florida

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):A $400 million, 176-mile transmission line that will connect Gulf Power Co.’s service territory in the Florida panhandle to Florida Power & Light Co. customers in the state’s northeast could boost the value of solar generation for both utilities thanks to their time zone difference.Optimizing solar is one of several potential benefits likely to factor into any decision by NextEra Energy Inc. to merge its two regulated subsidiaries into one utility, along with other corporate and regulatory obligations it could streamline through a merger.During NextEra Energy’s investor conference June 20, Gulf Power President Marlene Santos said management is assessing the impacts of merging flagship utility FPL and Gulf Power, which NextEra purchased from Southern Co. in 2018. As of June 26, NextEra Energy said it is still reviewing all options on what combining the two companies would mean for customers currently served by FPL and Gulf Power.FPL serves nearly 5 million customers in southern Florida as well as the state’s northeast, while Gulf Power has about 460,000 customers in the Florida panhandle. Since the panhandle is in the Central Time Zone, while the rest of Florida is in Eastern Time Zone, Gulf Power’s North Florida Resiliency Connection transmission project could help with electricity demand and solar generation.“Once the line is built, it’s very possible that solar in Gulf’s territory monitors very valuable because it is time shifted from where most of the load is,” NextEra Chairman, President and CEO Jim Robo said during the investor presentation. “You will be able to deliver solar at that last hour when the sun is setting, but it hasn’t set yet where Gulf is.”Michael Goggin, vice president of consulting firm Grid Strategies LLC, said having larger grid operating areas connected by transmission allows utilities to better adjust to variance in weather and climate across different regions. In the case of FPL and Gulf Power, their time zone difference shifts supply and demand peaks for electricity and could help mitigate sudden demand surges, such as when people come home in the evenings or ramp up air conditioning during hot summer days.More ($): Solar could serve both utilities if NextEra combines FPL, Gulf Power New transmission line could boost solar in Floridalast_img read more

Are trail sports better than road sports?

first_imgIllustration by Wade Mickley88% say yesTrails are about releasing the spirit, not simply training the body. I run “on” the road; I run “with” the trail. There is no activity more primal than running in the woods. It reminds me that we are animals. When I run on the road, my legs and lungs are the most engaged parts of my body. When I run on a trail, I watch for rocks, roots, snakes, deer, and changes in the lay of the land. I smell wet leaves and pine resin. Trail running engages my whole body; it makes it sharper and looser. When I run on the road, I’m being dutiful and dedicated. When I run on a trail, I am wild and free.—Chris Alexander, Davidson, N.C. Adventure in the rugged outdoors always trumps the challenges that lay ahead on polished urban landscapes. Nothing beats being enveloped by the living forest, then feeling the raw earth crunching and shifting below, and inhaling the fresh oxygen rushing in to relieve overworked, burning lungs. However, road sports get more attention because spectators can watch them easier—plopping down beside the road or in front of their TV.—Jonathan Poston, Asheville, N.C. Leaving the stresses of a job and society for a few minutes—whether it be on a mountain bike or on foot—gives me a connection to something greater than any human can build. Most trails that I visit on a regular basis run with the topography of the land and provide a greater physical challenge than simply running or biking on asphalt.—Clint Ivester, Dallas, Ga. While being better for your overall physical self, trail sports also provide a better, safer atmosphere. They are primitive and enriching. We should appreciate our forests and trails while they’re still there, because they are being assaulted by development and commerce on all fronts.—Nikki McDuffee, Stanardsville, Va.I have run several road marathons over the years, and I have found that my knees and other joints aren’t as receptive to the pounding they must take on the asphalt. What running I do now is on trails. The ground has a lot more give, and the scenery is much nicer.—Karl Kunkel, High Point, N.C.I prefer to run and mountain bike on trails away from fuel-burning vehicles. Inhaling those fumes can’t be good for my health. A road run or ride may do more harm than good to my lungs.—Torrey Coffey, Loganville, Ga.———-12% say noWhile I enjoy the solitude of running in the woods, I have more fun during the experience of larger road races. At some of my favorites, like the Army 10-Miler in Washington, D.C., and the Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta, tens of thousands of runners congregate in a single spirit. The energy is amazing at these bigger races, and I feel like I am attending a festival. It takes my mind off the physical challenges of the distance and lets me just enjoy being a runner.This is what running is all about—going out and having a great time with some like-minded people. It’s also fun to get the encouragement of huge cheering crowds and take in the sights, including many of our country’s greatest historical landmarks. The best way to see a city is on foot with thousands of running friends.—Rick Moore, Alexandria, Va.I rely on road sports for exercise—mostly out of convenience. I need to run after long days at work to clear my head and relieve stress, but living in a city doesn’t give me the luxury of being able to quickly access a secluded wooded trail. The urban jungle certainly has its disadvantages—inconsiderate drivers, smog, and a lack of scenery—but I’ll take it over the confines of a stuffy, overpriced gym.—Mary Graves, Atlanta, Ga. I’d rather head to the track than the trail. For me, running is all about speed and pushing myself to my absolute limits. I love to see how fast I can sprint, and I just can’t do that on trails with a lot of rocks and roots. The same goes for races. I just can’t post a PR on a rugged mountain course, so I stick to the pavement where I can satisfy my need for speed.—Adam Harvey, Charleston, S.C.last_img read more

Commission grants USC control of Coliseum

first_imgFollowing eight months of negotiations, USC obtained day-to-day control of the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in a vote by the Coliseum Commission on Monday.The stadium’s nine-member governing body, represented by officials from the state, county, and city, voted 8-1 to surrender control of the facility, along with the adjacent L.A. Sports Arena to the university for at least 20 years. The sole dissenting vote was cast by Los Angeles City Councilmember Bernard Parks, who has long opposed the amended lease as currently drafted.The lease has five renewal options beyond the initial 20 years that would allow USC to control the publicly owned stadium through 2054, although the commission will continue to oversee both facilities.“We look forward to restoring the Coliseum to its former glory and ensuring its viability for many generations to come,” said Thomas Sayles, USC’s senior vice president for university relations, in a statement. “We believe this agreement will once again make the Coliseum a proud landmark and gathering place for all Angelenos.”USC will be tasked with event scheduling, along with funding various improvements and restorations that are expected to total approximately $70 million. As a result, the university will be given control over revenue and will be allowed to negotiate the sale of the naming rights to the Coliseum.USC’s football team has been a tenant at the stadium since the Coliseum’s opening in May 1923.In June 2011, the commission acknowledged it would be unable to make nearly $60 million in necessary renovations to the Coliseum, breaking the terms of the original lease with USC signed in 2008, which led the university to seek day-to-day management of the venue and the neighboring Sports Arena.Negotiations began in September, and a terms sheet was released in January that outlined several modifications to the original lease.last_img read more