OBITUARY Arnold F Lanni 91

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Arnold F. Lanni, 91, of Southbridge, MA, formerly of Wilmington, MA and Vermont, fondly known as “Al” to his family and friends, passed away peacefully at home on January 30, 2019.Al was the beloved husband of Laurie Towne Slobody of Southbridge and the late Mary (Boylen) Lanni of Wilmington. He was the devoted father of Marion Lanni of Shrewsbury and Jeanne Lanni and her husband Richard Vinton of Southborough, MA, and the late Michael, Arnold F. Jr. “Al” and Mark Lanni; loving “Grampy” of David John Gagnon III, Lanni Jeanne Gagnon and Olivia Leahy Vinton; cherished son of the late Domenic Lanni; and dear brother of Fred Rusha of Hudson, FL and John Rusha of Auburn, ME. He was the beloved brother-in-law of Jeanne (Boylen) & Benedict Crupi of Reading, Mary and the late George Boylen of Wilmington, Daniel and the late Janet Boylen of Lunenburg, the late Barbara (Boylen) and Jerry White of Wilmington, and Roger and Laurie Slobody of West Brookfield. Al is also survived by many others who adore him, including numerous nieces, nephews and friends.Al was born on March 17, 1927, in Everett, MA. As a young boy, Al, was raised and educated in Roxbury and West Roxbury. While living there, he had fond memories of belonging to the “Knot Hole Gang”, a group of young boys who paid 5 cents to get into the Boston Braves games.When Al was in the sixth grade, he moved to Foxborough, MA. There, he continued his education, graduating from Foxborough High School with the Class of 1945. While in high school, he was very active. In addition to serving as Class President for three years, he was a drummer in the high school band and he played on the baseball, basketball and football teams. In his non school time, he played drums for a 27 piece community swing band.After graduation, Al enlisted in the United States Coast Guard to serve his country during World War II. He was honorably discharged in May of 1946 and returned home to his family.For the next several years, Al moved to Maryland to continue his education. He attended Severn Academy Prep School in Severna Park, MD and Hagerstown Junior College in Hagerstown, MD.In 1951, Al entered the United States Navy to serve his country during the Korean War. He served aboard the USS Tarawa and at the US Naval Receiving Station in Brooklyn, NY. Following four years of active duty, Al was honorably discharged in 1954.After leaving the Navy, Al went on to attend Boston University where he earned his Bachelor’s Degree with honors. In 1964, he earned a Master’s Degree in Education from the State College at Boston.Following college, Al began a long and rewarding career as a public school teacher and administrator, while always continuing his own education. In 1957, he began teaching American History at Topsfield High School. In 1959, transferred to Sudbury Public Schools to serve as Chairman of the Social Studies Department at Curtis Junior High School. While in Sudbury, he also served as Chairman of the Professional Standards Committee of the Sudbury Teachers Association and was elected President of the Board of Directors of the Lincoln-Sudbury Town Employees Federal Credit Union. In 1963, Al received the Silver Tray Award by the Sudbury Kiwanis Club for “The Teacher Who Has Done the Most for the Sudbury School System”.Following his tenure in Sudbury, Al accepted a position at the Massachusetts Department of Education. As a Senior Supervisor, he traveled around the state providing public schools with training in curriculum development, program evaluation and teacher training. He was also responsible for evaluating federal programs. During these years, Al was called on to assist in producing several publications. He became a contributing author to the Curriculum Guide for the U.S.S. Massachusetts and to the Aerospace Curriculum Resource Guide published by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.During his teaching years and his years spent at the Massachusetts Department of Education, Al was also an active contributor to his own community. He served as Chairman of the Wilmington School Committee, was a member of the Wilmington Conservation Committee, and an active member of the Wilmington Community Fund. As in his work life, Al spent his personal time trying to better the lives of others.In 1970, Al accepted a position with the Arlington Public Schools. After serving as the district’s Director of Curriculum, he was promoted to Assistant Superintendent. In that position, he received many accolades for his expertise in administration, planning, curriculum, personnel and community relations. He developed a wonderful reputation for honesty, loyalty, expertise in education and his ability to speak his mind.In 1984, Al brought his knowledge, planning abilities, and belief that all children can learn at high levels to Vermont. He accepted the position of Superintendent of Schools in Vergennes, VT and served Vergennes and the surrounding communities. While there, he also served as Regional Chairman for the Vermont Superintendents Association.Following his Vermont tenure, he returned to Massachusetts to become Superintendent of Schools in 1989 in Southbridge, MA. During his years in Southbridge, he was instrumental in improving curriculum and was responsible for training teachers in Total Quality Management.Al retired in June of 1993 from the Southbridge Public Schools, following a long and illustrious career. His dedication to students, faculty and the evolution of public education was unwavering. Throughout his work life, he put his heart and soul into everything he did, with the goal of making this world a better place for future generations.Following retirement, and up to the time of his passing, Al continued to be an active contributor to the town of Southbridge. He was elected and served on the Town Council, the town’s Long-Range Planning Committee, the High School Scholarship Committee and the committee formed to raise funds for the public schools. He was chosen to represent Southbridge on the Central MA Planning Commission and served in that role for many years. Until his passing, Al remained an active member of the Southbridge Rotary, as well as the Italian-American Club.In addition to his commitment and service to the public education, country, and community, Al’s other “passions” included his family, gardening and sports. He will always be remembered for his devotion to his family…always there to lend a helping hand, give advice, and unconditional love. He was a man who totally enjoyed sports, especially golfing, skiing and bocci. He also loved his beloved Patriots and never missed a game. Fortunately for this year’s Super Bowl, he had the best seat of all…Al was a gentleman in every way…truly a “gentle man”. He totally enjoyed life, was caring and giving of his time and talents to help others, and forever enriched the lives of everyone he met.Family and friends are invited to gather a Mass of Christian Burial at Notre Dame Church, 446 Main St., Southbridge, MA on Friday, February 8th at 12:00 noon. Following Mass, all are invited to continue the celebration of Al’s life at the LaSalle Reception Center located next to the church. A private burial will be held on Monday, February 11th in Wilmington, MA. Family members are invited to meet on that day at Nichols Funeral Home, 187 Middlesex Ave., in Wilmington for a 12:00 noon service. Burial will follow at Wildwood Cemetery.In lieu of flowers, donations in Al’s memory may be made to the American Cancer Society, 30 Speen St., Framingham, MA 01701.Arnold F. Lanni(NOTE: The above obituary is from Nichols Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: William J. “Bill” Wolfe, 75In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Lucille C. (Enos) Gilson, 77In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: John “Jack” Tannian, Jr., 89In “Obituaries”last_img read more

OBITUARY Americo R Rulli 87

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Americo R. Rulli, of Danvers and a former longtime resident of Wilmington passed away peacefully, February 4, 2018. He was 87 years of age. Americo was the beloved husband of the late Antonina (Lauria) Rulli. Born in Boston he was one of seven children of the late Antonio and Domenica (DeMeis) Rulli.Americo was raised and attended school in Medford. He was a decorated United States Army Veteran of the Korean War honorably serving from 1952 to 1954. Americo worked for a number of years as an Engine Cleaner at Conrail freight yard in Allston. He also worked for many years prior to his retirement as a self-employed interior painter. Very talented with his hands, Americo enjoyed wood crafting and spending time tending to his garden. He also enjoyed horse racing, traveling and vacations in Maine. However, his greatest joy was his family and nothing made him happier than to spend time with his children and grandson. He will be greatly missed.In addition to his late wife and parents, Americo is sadly predeceased by his sisters, Viola Rulli, Mary Gifun, and Josephine DeFasio.He is survived by his children, Anthony Rulli and his wife Kimberly of Billerica, Diane Toomey and her husband Richard of Danvers. He was the loving grandfather of Richard J. Toomey of Methuen. Brother of Helen Cahill of Illinois, Hilda Cara and Anthony Rulli, both of Burlington.Family and friends are respectfully invited to gather at the Dello Russo Family Funeral Home, 374 Main St., WILMINGTON, Thursday, February 7th, at 9 a.m. followed by a funeral Mass celebrated in St. Thomas of Villanova Church, 126 Middlesex Ave, Wilmington, at 10 a.m. Services will conclude with Military Honors and burial at Wildwood Cemetery, Wilmington. It has been requested that in lieu of flowers contributions may be made in Americo’s memory to the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105-1942 or Care Dimensions Hospice, 75 Sylvan St., Suite B-102, Danvers, MA 01923.Americo R. Rulli(NOTE: The above obituary is from Dello Russo Funeral Home.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedOBITUARY: Thomas F. Connolly, 86In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: Paul L. D’Eon, 83In “Obituaries”OBITUARY: William J. “Bill” Wolfe, 75In “Obituaries”last_img read more

Indian Navy set to negotiate purchase of multirole Sikorsky helicopters

first_imgThe Indian Navy is finally set to open price negotiations with Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation for buying 24 Seahawk S-70B shipboard multi-role helicopters (MRHs) for its operational requirements.Indian Ministry of Defence (MoD) sources told India Strategic defence magazine that although the helicopters were selected in December 2014, there were some issues over cost escalations due to the delay in the procurement process, and the Connecticut, US-based company’s insistence that it could not hold the prices it had offered in 2008. Recently, however, Sikorsky had relented and its team is due to be invited soon for an early conclusion of the price negotiations.The subject is also likely to be on the agenda during Defence Minister Manohar Parikkar’s visit to Washington on December 9-10.Notably, the Indian Navy had invited bids in 2008 from Sikorsky for S-70B and European NH Industries (NHI) for NH 90. There was some hesitation in opening the latter’s bid, as Finmeccanina, which got embroiled in controversy over the acquisition of VVIP helicopters for the Indian Air Force (IAF), is a major partner in this European consortium.Sikorsky accordingly had a walkover, but it asked for revision in prices as the selection process had taken more than twice the stipulated timeline and the delivery, in any case, has to be three years after the price negotiations conclude and a contract is signed. That is roughly 10 years after its offer was submitted.Somehow, the MoD repeatedly sought extensions of Sikorsky’s bid, delaying the acquisition process timelines from less than three years to six. Nonetheless, it said there was no provision for cost escalation during the selection and negotiation process.Meanwhile, in another development, Sikorsky has been acquired by Lockheed Martin (LM) from United Technologies Corporation (UTC). After the completion of the merger process in early November, Sikorsky was shown for the first time as a Lockheed Martin company at the Dubai Airshow on November 8.As for the current status in negotiations with the Indian Navy, the chief of the naval staff, Admiral Robin Dhowan, when asked about the Seahawks, replied that the process was now in an “advanced stage”.Notably, the tender, or Request for Proposals (RfP), had sought 16 helicopters with an option for eight more. But Admiral Dhowan had told India Strategic earlier that as the navy was short of these machines, the deal could be for all the 24 machines.It may be recalled that the navy had originally planned to acquire 54 MRHs, and 16 of these should have come in 2007 as replacement for the first lot of quarter-century-old British Westland Sea Kings. More were to follow progressively. This has not happened, and the Sikorsky Seahawks are likely to start arriving only from 2019, more than a decade late.The Sikorsky deal is estimated to be around $1 billion-plus for 16 helicopters but there is no official word yet on prices from either side.Weapons and sensors will be extra – possibly from other companies but Sikorsky will integrate them in accordance with the contract. The weapon suite will have the capability to deal with both underwater (ASUW or anti-submarine warfare) and ASW (anti- surface-ship warfare). Among the suppliers for radars and weapons should be the US Raytheon and Telephonics as well as French Thales. The power plants (two engines per machine) will be from GE.It may be noted that the Indian Navy has substantial achievements to its credit for building ships indigenously, and with a three aircraft carrier policy, it will need several hundred helicopters for engaging threats and for ship to ship or ship to shore communications.last_img read more

Goods likely to become pricey as truckers go on indefinite strike

first_imgKolkata: With trucks going off the road due to the all-India strike protesting against the steep hike in diesel price, there are apprehensions of essential goods becoming expensive. But according to the experts, its effect can only be realised if the strike continues for more than 48 hours.Truck owners have gone for the strike, protesting against the Centre’s indifference towards bringing down the price of diesel. There are around 45 lakh trucks in the state. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsWith trucks going off the road, both export and import of goods have come to a stop. There are several goods including fish and onion which need to be imported from other states. There will not be much effect if the truck strike is withdrawn within the next 48 hours. But the prices of essential commodities, mainly of the ones which need to be exported from outside, would go up if it continues even after 48 hours. Most importantly, the stock of the commodities that need to be imported would run out if the strike continues. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedSince there should not be any effect on the prices of essential goods in the next 48 hours, there will be strict vigilance at all the markets in the city to ensure that prices of commodities do not go up unnecessarily and lead to inconvenience of common people. There are some occasions in the state as well, on Tuesday. So, the steps have been taken to ensure that prices of goods do not go up.The state government has also taken necessary steps to ensure that middlemen do not get the opportunity to increase the prices of essential goods in this span of time. It may be mentioned that the last meeting of the task force took place on June 6 and the concerned officials were directed to take necessary steps so that prices of essential goods do not go up without any valid reason.In the same meeting, directions were given to ensure that the prices of potato and onions, a large quantity of which have to be imported from Nasik, do not go up.Stress was also given to increase the state’s production of the commodities that have to be imported from other states.Representatives of the truck owners have, however, claimed that they would continue with their strike if the demands are not met.last_img read more