Paralysed lad shows improvement

first_img– mother thanks public for assistanceBibi Khan, mother of eight-year-old Mathew Zaman who became paralysed following an accident on the Railway Embankment, East Coast Demerara in December 2017, is counting her lucky stars that the young boy is showing signs of improvement.Injured: Matthew ZamanKhan related that she had been praying for her son over the months, and this is a stage of comfort with the development in his condition.The mother of eight explained that Zaman could not speak, or move his hands and legs, but is now able to sit up with little assistance.“We try to see if we could get him to sit up, but he can’t sit up for long; he does sit up for 10 minutes at a time”, the elated woman told Guyana Times during a telephone interview. Although he showed some improvement, he cannot breathe without the help of a tube in his throat.Khan added that she has been contacted by several organisations throughout the country, and they willingly contributed to the cause with the aim of getting Khan better.Other persons have shown interest in Zaman’s case, and are also willing to assist the family. “People (are) donating things for him, but he needs financial help,” Khan’s mother noted.Nevertheless, she is thankful for all the love and appreciation shown to her and little Matthew Khan over the last few months.Little Matthew was struck by a minibus outside their home at Lot 20 Felicity Railway Embankment, East Coast Demerara on December 18, 2017 while he was playing.The mother, who was almost brought to tears as she recalled the incident, said she was at work when she heard about her son’s tragedy, and she immediately rushed to the Georgetown Public Hospital, where, to her horror, when she arrived there, her son was motionless.Little Matthew sustained a fractured skull, which resulted in swelling in the brain; damage to his lungs, and injury to his spine, which hinders his mobility. At just eight years old, the child’s life has come to a drastic point, where he is unable to function like a normal child his age.Breathing only with the help of tubes, due to the damage to his lungs; and feeding only through tubes as well, little Matthew has met a cruel fate. Recognising this, his mother said, she quit her job as a domestic worker to care for her baby. Khan, a mother of eight, said she had no other option but to leave her job.She said this phase of their lives has become very challenging. Matthew’s dad does not play a role in his life, after his parents separated when he was just two years old; so his mother is left to grapple with all the expenses of raising her children and caring for Matthew. Khan says she has a 26-year-old daughter who assists her.The driver involved in the accident had allegedly been charged for dangerous driving last December, and was released on $100,000 bail.The matter was adjourned until July 23.last_img read more

Klopp praises ‘outstanding’ Reds display

first_imgThe hosts had made a strong start and took a deserved lead through Sadio Mane in the 24th minute, but United quickly hit back with an equaliser from Jesse Lingard nine minutes later.Klopp hailed the performance of his players as they kept the Red Devils on the back foot and maintained their unbeaten start to the Premier League season to go one point clear of Manchester City at the top of the table.“I’m completely over the moon about the performance,” the German said in his post-match interview. “The way the boys played tonight was just outstanding.“We saw the line-up of United and their quality – how well organised they were and they fight from the back, you knew it could be really tough.“But the plan was to take the risks, be brave and chip the ball behind the lines. The first goal was how, if you could have drawn, it would have been the goal. It was just brilliant.“A fantastic performance, it’s so deserved. Top, top first-class team. I don’t think United wanted to play defensively but we didn’t let them out. Overall it was just brilliant.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Klopp praises ‘outstanding’ Reds displayLONDON, United Kingdom, Dec 17 – Liverpool boss Jurgen Klopp insists his team were full value for their 3-1 victory over Manchester United on Sunday which took them back to the league summit.Xherdan Shaqiri was the hero for the Reds at Anfield after his two deflected strikes in the second half killed off the Reds’ fierce rivals, who were still in the contest at the break.last_img read more

Panama Canal expansion boosting opportunity for U.S. ag

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A violent lightening streak tore across the sky on a recent trip for a group of U.S. farmers to visit the Panama Canal.“When we were at one of the locks it was just clouding up and a crack of lighting came from nowhere. It is a much more intense lightening than we have here in Ohio and it startled a lot of people. The tour guide said that the lightening is a blessing because without that lightening there is no rain, and if there is no rain water, there is no canal,” said Jeff Magyar, a northeast Ohio soybean grower who was on the trip. “The canal is a giant freshwater lake. They lift you up 40 feet and they drop you down 40 feet on the coasts and you go through a giant lake in the middle. When they open the gates at either end, all of that freshwater runs out into the ocean. They cannot bring saltwater in because that would impact the environment. With the new lock they have big cement basins to catch a higher percentage of that water they get to re-use for the lake because they may not have enough rainwater in a dry year. The weather down there is like Florida where they get violent thunderstorms almost every day, but with much more magnitude in the storms. That is what keeps the environment going down there and that is what feeds water to the canal.”Magyar sits on the board of the Soy Transportation Coalition (STC) through his involvement with the Ohio Soybean Council. Because of the importance of the project to U.S. agriculture, the STC held its annual meeting in early December in Panama where around 100 U.S. soybean farmers (including Magyar) and staff members of soybean associations from around the country got a tour and received an update on the canal’s expansion from officials with the Panama Canal Authority. Along with the abundant rain, the U.S travelers definitely took note of the high temperatures and humidity.“I like the sun, but by noon or 1 in the afternoon there were not many people outside. It was like the hottest part of our warmest day in the summer at dawn down there and then it warms up for the rest of the day,” Magyar said. “It is all tropical rainforest around the canal. I never realized that they have such biodiversity there. It is amazing.”The Panama Canal recently celebrated a century in operation as a monumental achievement of mankind to add efficiency to world travel in a path cut through the wilderness.“The most impressive thing to me was that last year was 100 years in operation. The coast of that country is flatland and the middle of the country is mountains. They had to remove the mountain range 120 or so years ago. The magnitude of doing that 100 years ago was impressive. It is one thing to dig a ditch on the flatland. It is another to dig up a mountain range. Thousands of people died working on that project from malaria and yellow fever from the mosquitos,” Magyar said. “Today half of the money from the canal goes to keeping up the canal and the other half goes to the government. It is definitely a plus for American agriculture. It will also help South American agriculture but the U.S. is the No. 1 beneficiary. We were treated like royalty on the trip because American agriculture is still their top source of revenue for the canal.“I was shocked by the rates in the canal. I have read that the average fare through there is $80,000 to $100,000 but they were saying the average big, dry bulk shipment is more like $400,000. It takes 14 days to go around though.”The Panama Canal has proven to be a valuable shortcut for U.S. grain and soybean exports, connecting vessels loaded in the U.S. Gulf and at East Coast ports for destinations in Central America and Asia. The Panama Canal is wrapping up a $5.25 billion effort to expand its locks to meet current transit volumes, expand vessel transits supporting global trade growth, and to accommodate larger vessel sizes.Three out of every 10 bushels of grain and soybean exports from the U.S. go through the canal, accounting for more than half the exports through the Center Gulf, one-tenth of the Texas Gulf exports and nearly 30% of the Atlantic Coast exports. For soybeans specifically, the Panama Canal handles 44% of total U.S. exports — approximately 600 million bushels of U.S. soybeans annually.With the expansion, the canal will offer the potential for increased loading per vessel, larger vessel sizes to be used, decreased canal transit time, and lower transport costs overall. While in Panama, the group with the STC toured the current canal locks on both the Atlantic and Pacific sides of the country. In addition, participants were able to view the new expanded canal locks that are scheduled to be open for use in April.“It is incumbent upon farmers to not only be knowledgeable of and passionate about the supply and demand side of their industry. Farmers must also be knowledgeable of and passionate about the transportation system that allows supply to connect with demand,” said Mike Steenhoek, executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition. “The Panama Canal — both the current and future expanded canal — is an important artery that allows the U.S. soybean industry to be so competitive in the international marketplace. Farmers need to understand this key link in our logistics chain, which will hopefully serve to increase our resolve and motivation to demand that our nation appropriately invests in our own transportation system. If we fail to make these investments in our ports, inland waterways, railroads, and roads and bridges, the expanded Panama Canal will truly be a missed opportunity.”There particularly importance with the canal expansion for Magyar specifically, who grows food grade soybeans for export from his farm in Ashtabula County.“I grow all food grade beans, but we also have a storage facility where we take commercial beans. I work with Western Reserve and we have 750,000 bushels of storage. I use our old facility to keep the food grade beans segregated,” Magyar said. “This will potentially lower shipping costs, particularly on container shipments to the Asian markets and also possibly the Eastern European markets where they are very interested in non-GMO beans. The U.S is still the most reliable supply of soybeans and this will help us get our soybeans to the end user at a lower cost.”The Panama Canal is even more valuable to eastern U.S. agriculture due to the West Coast shipping slowdowns resulting from ongoing labor disputes between the Pacific Maritime Association, which represents companies that own West Coast ports, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which represents dock workers.“Ohio food grade soybeans are preferred in Asian markets, but our shipping costs have typically been the highest because they had to go by rail to the West Coast. But now, neither the customers nor the sellers want to deal with shipping through the West Coast because of all the issues they are having with labor out there. They are having so many problems shipping from the Pacific Northwest on the West Coast to Asia that more of our soybeans are going to be leaving from the Mississippi or the East Coast. They are saying that maybe the problems on the West Coast cannot be fixed,” Magyar said. “Now they are expanding the ports of Savannah and others and dredging them out to accommodate the new big ships that can go through the new Panama Canal. It is on the drawing board to get some of these ships that can utilize the new expanded canal into more American ports. There are half a dozen or so of these projects if the funding from Congress comes through. With the new canal for these big ships, we’ve got to be able to get them in our ports and nobody can rely on the West Coast ports right now because of the volatility there. Railroads have also been unreliable with the oil coming out of the Dakotas and that has been another issue with sending beans west.”In the end, the Panama Canal expansion will simply provide one more much-needed transportation advantage in the increasingly competitive world of agriculture, Steenhoek said.“With the expansion in the Panama Canal, we will be able to load ocean vessels that hold easily 500,000 more bushels of soybean per vessel. A typical ocean vessel today is loaded with 2.1 or 2.2 million bushels, so adding 500,000 bushels is substantial,” he said. “This is just shaving cents off the eventual delivered price at a time when agriculture is facing some headwinds from a strengthening U.S. dollar, a devaluation of the Brazilian Real, and a softening economy in China. This is a wonderful opportunity to provide benefits to U.S. agriculture by making our transportation system more efficient and making ourselves more competitive in the international marketplace.”For more on transportation and the Panama Canal, visit: soytransportation.org/issues.last_img read more

The Power in Clarity of Purpose

first_imgLast weekend I was reviewing my projects and tasks when I recognized how many of the projects and tasks had nothing to do with my goals now. I accumulated this list over the course of the last seven or eight years, and many of the tasks and projects are no longer relevant, and some of them belonged to issues that had been resolved over time. A good portion of them were things I am no longer interested in nor are they worth the investment of my time. Many of them are ideas and projects  I would love to work on, but I haven’t touched since they went on the list.Even though it is critical to capture everything you want or need to do in a place where you can track those projects, ideas, and tasks, not everything can be substantial enough to command your time and energy. Deciding to release myself from the obligation I had to what was no longer relevant, I exported the entire list to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (so I could be sure to have a record to review later) and pushed the delete button. All the tasks and projects disappeared, along with the power they held over me.I started over, typing in the major projects and outcomes that I genuinely care about and that are going to move me closer to my goals and aligned with my purpose. I added in the commitments I owe to other people, of which there were far fewer than I imagined. The list I deleted had 298 tasks, and the new list consists of 50 in 22 projects. About 15 of those tasks are routine maintenance, the things that I do every week, including things like emptying all my electronic inboxes and physical inboxes, and reviewing my lists and transferring the stuff I need to do into my analog sales planner.My project list and task lists are now much smaller. All the items on those lists are vital to me now. I liked a lot of ideas and potential projects that are on the list I deleted, and someday a few of them may resurface. What I have now is not a greater sense of control, but also a greater sense of clarity. Which brings us to the big idea.We collect a lot of projects and tasks and commitments. We make many more commitments than we realize, some which seem small and innocuous when we make them. Over time, the list of things that we have said yes to, and the list of things that someone else commits us to, without us recognizing how overcommitted we are. Each new project or tasks commands a tiny sliver of our remaining time, and energy, and focus. Even though we aren’t always conscious of each of those commitments, they each take a little bit of our psychic RAM, and they contribute to an overall sense of overwhelm.Starting with a clean sheet of paper provides a sense of clarity. It’s a chance to decide what is important to you, and an opportunity to release yourself from things that are no longer who you are—and no longer part of what you are here to do. If any of what is here resonates with you, I invite you to give yourself the gift of a do-over and write down what you want, what projects are critical to you, and what you should be doing with your limited time and energy to make the contribution you are here to make.After I deleted my task list, I wrote this post that I published on the blog yesterday: Being Overcommitted is a Sign of Being Uncommitted to Your Goals.last_img read more

Even I have paid fine for speeding: Gadkari

first_imgAmid concern over the hefty fines for traffic violations, Union Road Transport Minister Nitin Gadkari on Monday said even he has been fined for speeding on the Bandra-Worli sealink in Mumbai. Talking to reporters about the major decisions of the Modi-led government in its first 100 days, Mr. Gadkari said abrogation of Article 370 and bifurcation of Jammu and Kashmir was the “most important achievement” of the government. Criminalisation of instant triple talaq and the amended motor vehicles law were some of the big achievements of the Centre, he said.“Even I have paid a fine for speeding on the Bandra-Worli sealink,” Mr. Gadkari said adding that Maharashtra Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis and his cabinet collegaue Gen V.K. Singh also got speeding challans. The Motor Vehicles Amendment Act, approved by President Ram Nath Kovind last month, aims at stricter punishment for violation of traffic regulations and to bring discipline on roads.“Passing the MV Act amendment is a big achievement for our government. The high fines will lead to transparency, and (will) not result in corruption,” Mr. Gadkari said.Claiming that overspending on fines has helped people to adhere to traffic rules, Mr. Gadkari said: “For the new over speeding rules all are equal be it lawyers, doctors or politicians. We have increased the fines to save lives of lakhs of motorists.” The minister said road engineering is a reason, along with auto engineering, for the high incidents of accidents in India.Amendment of MV Act will improve road safety and reduce the number of road accidents and lives lost on roads, Mr. Gadkari said.last_img read more