Delight for thrifty shoppers as NCBI store reopens in Ballyshannon

first_imgCharity shop and sustainable fashion fans will be happy to hear that the National Council for the Blind of Ireland (NCBI) store in Ballyshannon is reopening.A new chapter begins for the fundraising shop as Natalie Quinn takes up the reins as Shop Manager from popular former Manager Naomi Brady.The store will be full of great quality second-hand items once more, with a treasure trove of shoes, household items, books and a large selection of bric-a-brac to discover. The NCBI is appealing for volunteers to get involved with stock and customer service.Grainne Whiteside, Area Manager said “reopening the Ballyshannon shop was a priority for NCBI as it is so embedded in the local community. We will continue to sell quality preloved clothing, accessories and bric a brac. We call on anyone interested in volunteering with the NCBI shop to contact us; even giving us as little as three hours a week would be of great assistance. Pop in and see our new selection of stock”.NCBI’s chain of 115 shops play a vital and integral part in the charity’s overall fundraising efforts, allowing the national sight loss agency to provide vital life changing services to over 6,000 people each year, many of whom live in Donegal.Also by supporting shops, customers not only generate funds for NCBI services but support the drive for more environmentally friendly and sustainable fashion and furniture. If you are interested in volunteering please contact Natalie Quinn, Shop Manager on 0858211128 or shopvolunteer@ncbi.ieDelight for thrifty shoppers as NCBI store reopens in Ballyshannon was last modified: October 9th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ballyshannonncbishoplast_img read more

NFL owner: Hang safety rules, players paid big money to incur high-risk behavior

first_imgShow of hands: Who is enjoying the NFL’s new player-safety rules?Hello? Anyone? I know you’re out there — I can hear you cracking your knuckles.Truth: No one likes the new rules of engagement, designed to reduce collisions on kickoffs, on helmet-to-helmet contact and on hits to the quarterback. Not the fans, though the fans don’t have much of a stake in player safety beyond the gladiator-on-gladiator mayhem that goes so well with pizza rolls and chip and dip. The players don’t seem to like …last_img read more

‘Increased access to better education’

first_img14 February 2014An improved matric pass rate, hugely increased enrolments from primary to tertiary level, and reinvestments in teacher training are among the signs that South Africa is improving access to quality education, President Jacob Zuma told Parliament on Thursday.Delivering his State of the Nation address in Cape Town, Zuma said the country’s matric pass rate had gone up from around 61 percent in 2009 to 78 percent last year, and that university and college pass rates were improving each year.“Through the annual national assessments, we keep track of improvements and interventions needed, especially in maths and science,” Zuma said.The number of children attending Grade R had more than doubled, from about 300 000 to more than 700 000 between 2003 and 2011, he noted, adding that a Draft Policy Framework towards Universal Access to Grade R has been gazetted for public comment, with a view to making Grade R compulsory.Around eight-million South African school children are exempted from paying school fees, while nine-million children are getting food at school.More schools to replace mud and other unsuitable structures are to be built, Zuma said. To date, 370 new schools have been delivered throughout the country via the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative, a national programme to tackle school infrastructure backlogs in the country.The R8.2-billion public-private programme aims to eradicate the 496 “mud schools” in the country, provide water and sanitation to 1 257 schools and electricity to 878 schools by March 2016.From 22 July until 6 December 2013, the initiative handed over one school per week in the Eastern Cape, which has been prioritised under the programme.The government is also investing in teacher training and the re-opening of teacher training colleges in order to meet the demand for a skilled workforce, Zuma said on Thursday.In the tertiary sector, enrolments at universities have increased by 12% since 2009, while Further Education and Training (FET) college enrolments have increased by 90%, Zuma said.To meet the growing demand, the budget of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme has been increased to R9-billion.Twelve new FET colleges are to be built, in Limpopo, Mpumalanga, KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape, Zuma said, complementing the recent establishment of two brand new universities, Sol Plaatje in the Northern Cape and the University of Mpumalanga.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Bafana at Afcon 2015: the full squad

first_imgThe new 2015 Africa Cup of Nations Bafana Bafana team before their warm-up game against Cameroon on Saturday 10 January, which came to a one-all draw. (Image: Bafana Bafana) Compiled by Mary AlexanderWith Bafana Bafana, South Africa’s national football team, set to kick off their first match in the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations on Monday 19 January, playing Algeria at the Estadio de Mongomo in Equatorial Guinea, we bring you facts and figures about the full 23-man squad.Jump to:StrikersMidfieldersDefendersGoalkeepersStrikersBernard ParkerBorn: 16 March 1986, BoksburgAge: 28Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2004Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #25, forwardCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaTokelo RantieBorn: 8 September 1990, Parys, Free StateAge: 24Height: 1.72 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: AFC Bournemouth – #28, forwardCurrent league: English Championship LeagueBongani NdululaBorn: 29 November 1989, Aliwal NorthAge: 25Height: 1.9 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: AmaZulu FC – #9, forwardCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaSibusiso VilakaziBorn: 29 December 1989, SowetoAge: 25Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Bidvest Wits FC – #10, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaNew Bafana Bafana coach Shakes Mashaba has been credited with bringing the national squad back to form, allowing them to qualify for the 2015 African Cup of Nations and beating out Nigeria, the previous champions. (Image: Bafana Bafana)Back to topMidfieldersThemba ZwaneBorn: 3 August 1989, TembisaAge: 25Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2011Current club: Mamelodi Sundowns FC – #34, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaAndile JaliBorn: 10 April 1990, Matatiele, Eastern CapeAge: 24Height: 1.72 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: KV Oostende – #15, midfielderCurrent league: Belgian Pro LeagueReneilwe LetsholonyaneBorn: 9 June 1982, SowetoAge: 32Height: 1.73 metresCareer start: 2002Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #6, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBongani ZunguBorn: 9 October 1992, Duduza, GautengAge: 22Height: 1.84 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Mamelodi Sundowns FC – #34, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaThamsanqa SangweniBorn: 26 May 1989, Empangeni, KwaZulu-NatalAge: 25Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Ajax Cape Town FC – #37, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaDean FurmanBorn: 22 June 1988, Cape TownAge: 26Height: 1.83 metresCareer start: 2008Current club: Doncaster Rovers FC – #4, midfielderCurrent league: English League OneThuso PhalaBorn: 27 May 1986, SowetoAge: 28Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: SuperSport United FC – #21, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaMandla MasangoBorn: 18 July 1989, Kwaggafontein, MpumalangaAge: 25Height: 1.68 metresCareer star: 2007Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #22, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaOupa ManyisaBorn: 30 July 1988, Mohlakeng, GautengAge: 26Height: 1.65 metresCareer start: 2008Current club: Orlando Pirates FC – #20, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaWatch Bafana Bafana’s road to the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations:Back to topDefendersSiyabonga NhlapoBorn: 23 December 1988, SowetoAge: 26Height: 1.8 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Bidvest Wits FC – #20, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaPatrick PhungwayoBorn: 6 January 1988, Alexandra, GautengAge: 27Height: 1.73 metresCareer start: 2008Current club: Orlando Pirates FC – #3, left-backCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaAnele NgcongcaBorn: 21 October, 1987, Cape TownAge: 27Height: 1.8 metresCareer start: 2003Current club: KRC Genk – #16, defenderCurrent league: Belgian Pro LeagueThulani HlatshwayoBorn: 18 December 1989, SowetoAge: 25Height: 1.89 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Ajax Cape Town FC – #3, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaEric MathohoBorn: 1 March 1990, Thohoyandou, LimpopoAge: 24Height: 1.98 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #3, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaRivaldo CoetzeeBorn: 16 October 1996, Kakamas, Northern CapeAge: 18Height: 1.79 metresCareer start: 2014Current club: Ajax Cape Town FC – #3, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaThabo MatlabaBorn: 13 December 1987, Tembisa, GautengAge: 27Height: 1.69 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Orlando Pirates FC – #8, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBack to topGoalkeepersDarren KeetBorn: 5 August 1989, Cape TownAge: 25Height: 1.83 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: KV Kortrijk – #16, goalkeeperCurrent league: Belgian Pro LeagueJackson MabokgwaneBorn: 19 January 1988, Polokwane, LimpopoAge: 26Height: 1.88 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: Bidvest Wits FC – #1, goalkeeperCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBrilliant KhuzwayoBorn: 9 February 1990, DurbanAge: 24Height: 1.9 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #16, goalkeeperCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBack to toplast_img read more

Many Huffington Post Readers Hate Site’s New Facebook-Powered Recommendation Engine

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Recommendation Engines#web Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting marshall kirkpatrickcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… The giant online publisher and aggregator Huffington Post began experimenting with a new content recommendation engine today, powered by Facebook and built by AdaptiveSemantics, the startup the company acquired last June. The feature uses the “Liked” Pages and shared articles of logged-in Facebook users who visit the Post to recommend recent content from across its wide swath of articles. It looks like a good and relatively simple feature. Surprisingly, HuffPo readers responding in comments on the announcement absolutely hate it!The feature sounds simple, but is a great example of the power of Facebook: the social network is not just a tool for publishers to push content onto, to increase distribution and pageviews, Facebook Connect is also a form of data portability that allows 3rd party websites to offer personalized content to their visitors. Many sites have exposed content that a Facebook user’s friends have shared, but this leveraging of the structured individual interest data is far less common.Could objections to using this data be rooted in the ongoing lack of clarity around Facebook’s privacy settings? Or did the company just shoot itself in the foot so badly 12 months ago when it made drastic privacy policy changes that people still distrust it today?The Down Side Reader comments range from confusion about the feature to distrust of anything associated with Facebook (“I don’t have one of those,” several people have said) to distrust of recommendations to concern about self-reenforcing political perspectives. “Great,” one frustrated comment read, “put your readers to work for you, is it not enough that we have to deal with your advertisements.” Unbelievable!Another: “If it involves Facebook, you can count me out. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Panathinaikos Beat Olympiacos 84-80, Ties Series

first_imgATHENS – Panathinaikos Superfoods defeated Spanoulis-less Olympiacos on Thursday at OAKA (84-80) in Game 2 of the Greek Basket League finals. Nikos Pappas led the Greens attack with 16 points and Mike James added 14.Score in each period: 17-20, 41-39, 59-53, 84-80TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img

Clarksons Contracting Activity Drops to 30Year Low

first_imgzoom The previous year was very weak for newbuild ordering as contracting activity fell to its lowest level in over 30 years in numerical and tonnage terms, according to Clarkson Research.Low levels of newbuild demand have continued to limit ordering across the majority of vessel sectors, and the majority of shipyards have struggled to win orders. However, record ordering activity in the cruise and passenger ferry sectors provided “a degree of positivity” for European yards in 2016.The 480 vessels reported ordered in 2016 represent the lowest level of newbuild contracting in over 20 years. While ordering in the containership and tanker sectors declined, the 48 and 46 vessels that were contracted in the bulker and offshore sectors respectively in 2016 represented record lows.The orders that were placed in 2016 were also smaller when compared to 2015, with owners contracting vessels as single units or in pairs. There were only 10 contracts placed for 5 vessels or more in 2016, compared to 63 contracts in 2015. The number of yards reported to have taken an order for at least one vessel (1,000+ GT) in 2016 fell to just 126, down 47% from last year’s total of 238 yards.A total of 44 Chinese yards were reported to have secured 212 orders of a combined 40 million CGT in 2016, representing a 66% y-o-y decrease in contracting volumes in CGT terms.Eleven South Korean yards were reported to have taken orders for 59 ships of 17.8 million CGT in 2016, down 83% y-o-y in CGT terms, while nineteen Japanese yards reportedly took 64 orders in 2016, and contracting levels declined 89% y-o-y to 1.3 million CGT.Meanwhile, European shipyards secured a reported 93 orders of a combined 3.4 million CGT in 2016. This is the second largest volume of orders in terms of CGT in 2016 and placed European yards ahead of their South Korean and Japanese counterparts for the first time since 1999.Ordering at European yards in 2016 decreased 29% in numerical terms from 2015 levels, however, in terms of CGT contracting increased by 33% y-o-y. This was greatly assisted by record newbuild interest in the cruise and passenger ferry sectors in 2016 and these vessel types account for 83% of the total CGT ordered at European yards in 2016. 15 orders for large cruise ships (100,000+ GT) accounted for 61% of orders in CGT terms. Of the 35 European yards reported to have taken an order in 2016, only seven won a contract in this sector.The weak newbuild ordering “has been felt across most vessel sectors and by most shipbuilders,” according to Clarksons.“The big Asian nations all experienced downturns in contracting, though strong cruise ordering supported some European yards, allowing them to ascend the builder rankings. As we begin 2017, yards in most parts of the world will be hoping for a brighter year,” Clarksons said.last_img read more

This Fall ELLE Canada Has a BrandNew Wardrobe

first_img Facebook THIS FALL, ELLE Canada HAS A BRAND-NEW WARDOROBE ! (CNW Group/TVA Group) TORONTO, Aug. 8, 2018 – Think of your new-look ELLE as you would a major update to your closet: There are some great new outfits, some classics with a twist and some daring party pieces. Everything fits perfectly and feels great to wear. And when you walk out the door, you feel inspired, empowered and ready to conquer the world. That’s the ELLE spirit, and you’ll find it on every page of ELLE Canada’s new-look September issue.Tracee Ellis Ross, of the primetime hit show Black-ish, is this month’s cover star—and a dream talent to help us launch our new look and the start of the fashion new year. In addition to our cover shoot and candid interview with the actress and style icon, this issue is overflowing with shopping and style advice, including the launch of our ELLE Guide. (This month’s topic: How to find your signature style, with expert advice from our editors.) Other highlights include the fall fashion and beauty trend reports, Saoirse Ronan and Lupita Nyong‘o in conversation and must-read features covering a range of subjects, from financial infidelity to luxe fall travel destinations.Canada’s #1 multi-platform fashion magazine brand has re-engineered its format, content pillars and marketing investment, providing ongoing commitment to Canadian audiences through delivering the highest-quality content. The new-look ELLE has been designed to function as an escape—it is elegant and modern while staying true to the aspirational and inclusive DNA of the ELLE brand, a recognized global brand with 46 editions worldwide. The new design further pushes our competitive advantage as a recognized luxury title with unparalleled access to celebrities, thought leaders and visionaries, all presented with the important Canadian perspective.  And, thanks to the ELLE network, Elle Canada has the unique position to showcase Canadian talent globally with our fashion shoots and content through syndication in editions around the world. Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With:center_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment The investment in high-gloss paper stock, newsstand and subscription promotions, digital-content strategies and video production ensures marketers reach the ultimate influencers—over 1.7 million every month.The team is led by editor-in-chief Vanessa Craft. “September has always been a time of re-invention, inspiration and excitement, and I couldn’t be more thrilled to share our new look with readers. Our editorial approach, both in print and online, continues with the same mission: to offer inclusive, accessible and aspirational content that helps women explore and celebrate their own style while building an empowered, authentic life.”“TVA Publications is committed to providing our readers and our marketing partners access to Canada’s leading fashion, beauty, and luxury products through brands like ELLE.  Our brand-new design and talented team continues to innovate across all our platforms” says Lyne Robitaille, Vice President, TVA Publications.The September issue of ELLE Canada, featuring Tracie Ellis Ross, is currently on newsstandsFollow ELLE Canada on social media:Facebook.com/ELLECanadaInstagram @ELLECanadaTwitter @ELLECanadaSnapchat @ELLECanadaSubscribe to the ELLE Canada YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/ELLECanadaComAbout TVA GROUPTVA Group Inc., a subsidiary of Quebecor Media Inc., is a communications company engaged in the broadcasting, film and audiovisual production, and magazine publishing industries. TVA Group Inc. is North America’s largest broadcaster of French-language entertainment, information and public affairs programming and one of the largest private-sector producers of French-language content. It is also the largest publisher of French-language magazines and publishes some of the most popular English-language titles in Canada. The Corporation’s Class B shares are listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol TVA.B.Logo: ELLE Canada (CNW Group/TVA Group) Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

SCHITTS CREEK SET TO END AFTER SIX SEASONS

first_imgEugene, left, and Dan accept the Best Comedy Series Award for Schitt’s Creek at the 2016 Canadian Screen Awards in Toronto. (Peter Power/Canadian Press)The Levys also play father and son on the sitcom, alongside Catherine O’Hara as the mother and Annie Murphy as the daughter of the Rose family, who lost their fortune due to a shady business manager and now live in a motel in a small town the dad bought as a joke years ago.Each character has carved out a niche in the town over the years, providing nuance and a joyful spirit that has helped Schitt’s Creek grow in popularity from season to season.Current hit on TV, Netflix, social mediaWhere the show once was a modest gem, it now has a spot on Netflix, countless memes and mentions on social media, and accolades from top critics.“It’s really been quite unbelievable,” said Eugene Levy, a comedy treasure and SCTV alum who was born in Hamilton.“Having a show like Schitt’s Creek in the autumn of my years, so to speak, is something not a lot of people get to experience.”The show has also spawned a live tour with sold-out audiences in Canada and the U.S., won several Canadian Screen Awards and was up for a Critics’ Choice trophy in January.“I’m sure people will be questioning, ‘Why walk away when so many people are watching it?”‘ Toronto-born Daniel said, noting he tries not to pay attention to the show’s buzz because he doesn’t want it to affect the creative process.“But the reality is, we’ve always been about the show, and I hope that when people watch this last season, they’ll understand that we did nothing but respect that experience.”Levy said he had a feeling around Season 3 that the story of the Roses was halfway through and would be done come Season 6. His dad was fully supportive and they’ve been carefully constructing the storylines to reach that conclusion ever since.‘Going out on a nice, natural high’“We’re going out on a nice, natural high and never really wanted to risk taking it any further into what I might call the law of diminishing returns,” said Eugene.Executives at CBC and Pop say they’re sad the show is ending, but admire the commitment of the Levys to wrap it up on their own terms.“It’s creative genius, and who am I to mess with creative genius?” said Sally Catto, general manager of programming for CBC English Television, noting the show has grown the public broadcaster’s audience, particularly its younger demographic.I truly think it will be, always, one of the greatest comedies ever created in this country.– Sally Catto, CBC Television“It really also became an anchor for a new era of [scripted] comedy at the CBC,” she added.“I truly think it will be, always, one of the greatest comedies ever created in this country.”Pop channel president Brad Schwartz, who also worked with Daniel when he was at MTV Canada, said it’s their highest-rated original series and has helped define the network.“It’s devastating,” he said of the decision to end it. “It’s one of the most proud pieces of content I’ve ever been involved with.“You don’t get shows like this very often in a career.”Daniel said he hopes the final season will provide closure and “tell the funniest, the sweetest, the most joyful episodes of our show we’ve ever told.”And he isn’t ruling out returning to the characters one day.“I would never say that this is the end. If we get an idea somewhere down the line that feels fresh and necessary and relevant, I would absolutely entertain any form of revisiting these lovely, strange characters.” Login/Register With: Schitt’s Creek fans: Prepare to say goodbye to the Rose family.As the hit Canadian comedy series cements its status as a critical and cultural smash during its fifth season, father-and-son co-creators Eugene Levy and Daniel Levy have announced the story will come to an end next year.In a statement on Daniel’s social media accounts Thursday, they revealed the beloved half-hour show will wrap up for good at the end of its sixth season. The 14 final episodes are due to begin in January 2020 on CBC in Canada and Pop TV in the U.S.To Our Dear Fans… pic.twitter.com/FIXjD3gbzA— dan levy (@danjlevy) March 21, 2019It’s a decision the Levys reached a long time ago and is one they’re excited about, they stressed in interviews with The Canadian Press, noting they’ve envisioned this final chapter from the beginning.“I’ve always known how the show was going to end,” Daniel, who is also the showrunner, said by phone from Toronto.“I’ve always seen every season of our show as a chapter in the story of this family’s life, and we have reached our inevitable conclusion in that story, so it was the right time and it was something that I had been building to for five seasons.” Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Schitt’s Creek Twitterlast_img read more

Editors vs Art Directors Part II

first_imgCatherine Neill Juchheim, my art director at Southern Breeze, the REAL magazine I edit, says that it is essentially up to the A.D. to ride herd over the material as well as the editors and sales people. “Whether it is a duel with the editor (no, 1,000 words of copy will NOT fit there!) or a fight with the sales guys over those last minute ads (and money always wins), it is up to the intrepid art director to make it work.”Anthony Picco, who served as my art director for four years at a not-for-profit, completely understood and agreed with my comments because we respected each other’s profession as well as each other as people. “My job is to make the information in the magazine attractive, readable, and enjoyable,” Tony says. “I fully understand that there are times that business politics dictate cover choices or lead articles. I have no problem accommodating that. In a healthy working relationship, I am happy to listen to editors’ suggestions.”However Tony admits that he prefers less specific comments from his editors (“The cover looks too busy,” or “This article has to look spectacular”). He adds that nothing annoys him more than when an editor tries to do HIS job with the “Make that type red” or “I want the type justified, not flush right.” Or as he puts it: “Nothing drives an art director crazier than an editor who is a frustrated art director.”Another former cohort, Samuel Fontanez, who worked as a staff artist and is now art director of a magazine I used to oversee, took exception to my seemingly iron-fisted management mantra. “While I agree it’s the editor’s job to reel in the A.D. into reality when he thinks they’ve gone too far, [the editor] is not the only person on staff privy to the magazine’s audience,” he says. “Any art director who doesn’t know the audience or industry he or she is doing layouts for is basically a temp who has overstayed his or her welcome. So I think we deserve a little more credit in that area.”John Scott, another former colleague who worked on two monthly publications where I was the managing editor, feels a lot of the issues between editors and their art doyennes are simply due to ego. “I think all editors and art directors have big egos, whether or not they admit it, so naturally there will always be clashes,” John wrote in his response to my initial post. “However, it is the ones on both sides that know how to control their ego and not let it get in the way that are the most successful. It is a team effort and there must be mutual respect and a bit of humility.” John adds that if those egos get out of control, the end product will suffer and the work situation will be miserable. “Do you want to be right or do you want to be happy? That’s always gotten me through plenty of situations.” Many of the initial blog responders took issue to the “art director is always the wife” statement comparing the editor/A.D. relationship to a marriage. Sam was no exception. To wit, he says that if art directors are the wife, “then I suggest we make Lorena Bobbit our patron saint!” (Anyone who doesn’t remember Lorena, Google her. And by the way, Sam … ouch!)Catherine was also not a fan of the husband and wife mentality and stresses equality among the players. “It’s the 21st century now, people; how many wives out there are truly subservient to their husbands?” she ponders. “It’s an equal partnership or else it ends in divorce.”John admitted that the “editor has final say,” but added that doesn’t necessarily mean they are always right. I agree with this sentiment whole-heartedly. In one of my blog comments, I talked about how my art director and I were seemingly up against the editor-in-chief (who had been in that specific industry for over 15 years) and a mousey associate editor regarding a particular cover design. Jonathan, the A.D., created a stunning, emotional visual from an idea I had. Instead, the EIC opted for tired stock art that did nothing for the magazine. [PS: The magazine folded five months later and Jonathan and I are the only ones still working in the magazine industry.]Unlike John, Tony acquiesced: “The editor is always right, in theory,” he says, “but there are ‘Editors from Hell’ and I have worked for some of them. What does an art director do when an editor has no taste whatsoever—not even bad taste—and yet that editor wants to interfere? What do you do with a micromanager editor who believes you can only do your job properly if your hand is held every step of the way, from concept to completion? Ultimately, I have been fortunate—only about 70% of the editors I worked for were insane.”Whether or not an editor is always right, Catherine agrees that it is the editor—not the art director—who has the first and last word with a magazine. “It is the editor who writes or assigns the stories that sets the tone for the art director to follow,” she says. “It is the art director’s vision that brings those stories to life across the pages, but it is the editor’s determination as to whether the art director’s vision is in keeping with the spirit of the editorial written.”Art directors lucky enough to have good editors basically have free reign with the look and feel of a magazine, which comes from mutual respect, according to Catherine. “It’s also an open communication atmosphere where the editor and art director freely share ideas and perhaps even cross the lines of responsibility at times. Mark listens to any story ideas that I might have for Southern Breeze and I listen to him when he has an idea for an image to go along with something he has written. We also tell each other pretty candidly when we think something isn’t going to work, and why. That way, both parties are invested in all aspects of the magazine, and both are driven to produce the best issue they can, time and time again. That is the only way to a successful magazine.”However, an atmosphere where the editor and art director are constantly at odds will only result in a second-rate magazine and a very tense environment. “There is just no way a publication can succeed if the two ‘parents’ are constantly fighting,” Catherine says. “That will just produce a take-side atmosphere and pretty soon the whole office is in an us-versus-them uproar and nothing good will come from that.”And the final word has to go to Catherine: “To the editor who may consider his or her art director a freak or diva: it takes one to know one. And I think Mark would agree!!”Boy do I! Apparently my last blog post—Editors vs. Art Directors—really struck a nerve, judging by the number of responses (22 by my last count). When the attacks got personal (name calling, questioning the legitimacy of my own magazine, etc.) it made me realize that there are some pretty deep-seeded feelings on this issue.The overall point of the last blog was that while the editor and art director are partners, the burden of responsibility always falls onto the editor. I’ve seen a lot more editors than art directors lose their jobs due to a magazine’s poor performance in my career. However, I have routinely seen art directors get the majority—if not all—of the praise for how great a magazine has turned around while the efforts of the editorial staff go totally unnoticed. That said, many of the art directors whom I sent the blog link to agreed with my comments. Maybe it helped that we worked (or still work) together in some capacity, or that they understood, not only where I was coming from, but my healthy attitude toward art directors.last_img read more