Caira dominant on mound in Orange’s 2-game sweep of Nittany Lions

first_imgThe Syracuse softball team posted two victories against Penn State Tuesday in a nonconference doubleheader in University Park. The Orange (27-20, 9-7 Big East) won the first game 2-0 and the second by a score of 6-1 to extend its current winning streak to four games. Published on April 27, 2010 at 12:00 pm Caira fired her third one-hitter of the season in game one, striking out 13 Nittany Lions with only two walks allowed. Next up for the Orange is a return trip to Pennsylvania to take on Pittsburgh this weekend. Syracuse plays three games against the Panthers, who currently sit fifth in the Big East. The game was deadlocked 0-0 until a two-run blast from third baseman Hallie Gibbs gave Syracuse the lead in the top of the seventh. It was her third home run in as many games. This was the Orange’s first win against Penn State (28-18, 7-7 Big Ten) since 2001.  — Compiled by staff writers Michael Cohen and Mark Cooper Head coach Leigh Ross turned to Caira once again to make the start in game two for the Orange. Her dominance continued as she allowed a single hit over five innings, striking out seven while walking one. center_img SU pitcher Jenna Caira picked up both wins for the Orange in her best performance of the season. She threw 12 shutout innings, racking up 20 strikeouts and giving up just two hits over the course of both games. Comments After a weekend series with Connecticut in which the team belted four home runs, the hot bats continued for the Orange. Gibbs and freshman Stacy Kuwik each hit two-run blasts in a four-run fifth inning that blew the game open. Gibbs now leads the team with six long balls, giving her 19 for her career. Facebook Twitter Google+ SU entered the doubleheader 1-7 against Penn State all-time and had never won at University Park. last_img read more

Quentin Hillsman is beating Jim Boeheim and Dino Babers in the social media race

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Merriam-Webster has two definitions for “meme,” both being nouns. One is “an idea, behavior, style, or usage that spreads from person to person within a culture,” while the other is “an amusing or interesting item (such as a captioned picture or video) or genre of items that is spread widely online especially through social media.”The latter definition surely applies to Hillsman’s practices, but the former does, too, because both Grant and redshirt junior guard Isis Young said they follow Hillsman on social media. They see his posts and are more motivated than amused because the messages of Hillsman’s memes are familiar. They’re the same lessons he preaches during practice.“You just see (the memes) and you reinforce,” Young said. “Like, ‘OK coach likes toughness.’ But we know that.” The content of these meme-lessons isn’t on a calculated schedule. It’s “random,” Hillsman said. Still, there are people who don’t even believe he’s tech-savvy enough to do any of this himself.“They’re sleeping on my abilities here, right?” he joked last week.But the people who do believe are the ones who matter the most. They’re the ones who run his plays and follow his rules. They’re the ones who came to Syracuse to play for @CoachQatSU. Comments Recruiting hatched Hillsman’s web presence. If the kids were using it, he figured he ought to as well. From there, it grew into a convenient way to stay in touch with players who have graduated and moved on.“He knows what this generation is all about and he’s a part of it,” junior guard Abby Grant said.Retweeting — essentially the reposting of another account’s original content — is not what sets Hillsman apart from the the likes of Boeheim and Babers. Rather, Hillsman also posts photos of himself and players captioned with large block lettering of an inspirational phrase.They often end up on his Instagram account as well. In a sense, they’re memes.center_img Published on November 14, 2017 at 10:02 pm Contact: jtbloss@syr.edu | @jtbloss Jim Boeheim hasn’t sent out a tweet in the month of November. Neither has Dino Babers, aside from an obligatory Veterans’ Day post with a graphic made by the SU football social media team. As popular as these coaches are — the billboards and TV commercials will show you they are quite popular in central New York — they are not Quentin Hillsman.Hillsman, or “Coach Q” as his Syracuse (1-0) women’s basketball players call him, is instead a man of memes. He inundates the Twittersphere, sharing loads of news from SU Athletics and producing original material of his own. Just as you’ll rarely spot him on the sideline wearing something as standard as Boeheim’s usual blue coat-grey pants combo, you’ll seldom see a day go by where he isn’t active on Twitter.“This new age, you guys don’t talk on the phone anymore,” Hillsman said. “You have to tweet and text and Instagram and all this.”He’s right. Nearly a quarter of teens admit to going online “almost constantly,” according to a 2015 report released by the Pew Research Center. A whopping 92 percent of teens hop online at least once a day, the report said, adding that this mania of internet usage is possible because nearly three-quarters of teens own or have access to smartphones. In a world where those phones are becoming increasingly multidimensional, Hillsman is using his to connect with his players of the past, present and future.last_img read more