Terminally Ill Kids Help Duchess Of Cornwall Decorate Royal Christmas Tree

first_imgThe Duchess of Cornwall served up sausages and mash at a tea party for children with terminal illnesses last week.The Duchess of Cornwall meets some of the patients of Helen & Douglas HouseCredit/Copyright: www.princeofwales.gov.uk/Her Royal Highness refused to stand on ceremony as she rolled up her sleeves and handed round plates to youngsters from the Helen & Douglas House children’s hospice who were visiting her official London home, Clarence House.Each year The Duchess invites 12 young people and their families from the home, of which she has been patron since 2007, to come in and help her decorate the Royal Christmas tree.Helen & Douglas House is a hospice in Oxford that cares for terminally ill children, young adults and their families.It provides medical, emotional and practical support, helping families deal with the implications of living with a child who will die prematurely, so that they can make the most of their time together.Opened in 1982, it was the world’s first children’s hospice and cares for children from birth to 16.Sporting a fuchsia dress and matching patterned scarf, The Duchess chatted to each of the children and their families about their often heartbreaking stories.Among them were Andrew and Kay Lyon from Oxford and their daughter Sienna, three, who suffers from a rare genetic condition that affects her brain.The couple told The Duchess of the unparalleled support the charity had given them, even looking after Sienna, who suffers from regular seizures and is unable to walk or talk, in order to take their two eldest children on holiday.“Helen House has been remarkable and the care they give Sienna just unparalleled,” Mrs Lyon said.“It is something we never expected, and has opened up a whole new life for us. We don’t know how long we will have Sienna with us, so this is about helping us to create some very happy and special memories.“Today has been huge part of that.”The Duchess then opened the doors to her drawing room, behind which her assistant equerry from the Welsh Guards, Captain Fred Lloyd George, was waiting. Resplendent in his uniform, he saluted the children.Her Royal Highness then helped them to choose several decorations each and carefully placed them on the twinkling tree.Afterwards it was time for tea and sausages and mash, as well as chocolate Christmas trees and decorated biscuits.The Duchess told the gathering: “It’s lovely to see you all and I hope you have enjoyed yourselves. This is one of my favourite things to do each year and seeing your faces as the door opens is magical.“Helen & Douglas House is a wonderful, uplifting place. Everyone should visit it.”Her Royal Highness also comforted Marie McVicar from Wiltshire, who lost her son Ollie Samways, seven, as a result of complication from pre-existing brain damage on November 1. Ollie’s sister Shayla, four, put his decoration on the tree instead.Marie, who is pregnant with a baby boy due in February, said: “Ollie sadly died at the hospice from a chest infection last month and I would do anything to support them. They have become my family.“Ollie was a very special little boy and met The Duchess when she visited the hospice earlier this year. She remembered him immediately and was a huge comfort.”Clare Edwards, chief operating officer at Helen & Douglas House, described the event as “magical”.“It’s such a unique day, so special,” she said. “It makes the children feel so worthy and special and important.“It’s a real privilege to have The Duchess as our Patron. She takes such an interest in the work we do and her patronage helps to shine a light on children’s palliative care.”Source:www.princeofwales.gov.uklast_img read more

Jerry Kill Out of Hospital After Seizure

Minnesota coach Jerry Kill has been released from the hospital after suffering a seizure late Saturday afternoon.The school confirmed Kill’s release Sunday. Gophers defensive coordinator Tracy Claeys told local reporters Sunday that Kill’s seizure was minor and that the coach could return to the team as early as Sunday afternoon.Kill was taken to the hospital Saturday as a precaution and was reported to be resting comfortably by Saturday night.Kill, 51, has had seizure disorder since being diagnosed with kidney cancer in 2005. He suffered a more severe seizure on the sideline during a game last September and had to be hospitalized for several days.That hasn’t stopped Kill in the past from getting right back out there.“What the hell am I supposed to do? Stop? I mean, sit in the chair and wait for the next dang seizure to come along?” Kill said last year.It’s the latest bit of adversity for the Gophers, who started the season 4-0 to generate optimism among the program’s long-suffering fans that a bowl game could be had.But they were thumped 31-13 at Iowa in the Big Ten opener, then delivered a sloppy and mistake-filled performance in the loss to the Wildcats on Saturday to fall to 0-2 in the conference. read more

Qualcomms not a monopoly Japan decides after decadelong investigation

first_img FTC vs. Qualcomm: Why you should care Share your voice Qualcomm is the world’s biggest provider of mobile chips, and it created technology that’s essential for connecting phones to cellular networks. The company derives a significant portion of its revenue from licensing those inventions to hundreds of device makers, with the fee based on the value of the entire phone, not just the components. But not all licensees want to pay as much as Qualcomm charges, and governments around the world have been investigating Qualcomm’s licensing practices for anticompetitive practices.In September 2009, Japan said investigations into Qualcomm found the company was violating the country’s Antimonopoly Act when it came to trade practices. The inquiries found that Qualcomm coerced Japanese handset manufacturers, such as Sony, to sign contracts that prevented them from asserting their own intellectual property rights. “This tends to impede the Japanese manufacturers’ … incentive to engage in research and development pertaining to technologies related to CDMA subscriber units, CDMA base stations and semiconductor integrated circuits used therein and tends to further strengthen Qualcomm’s influential position in the market pertaining to the technologies, thereby tending to impede fair competition in the technology market,” the JFTC said at the time. The Tokyo High Court in 2010 issued a stay on the cease-and-desist order. Since then, the JFTC has held 37 separate hearings on the case, Qualcomm said, and it rejected an initial finding related to cross-license agreements between Qualcomm and Japanese manufacturers. But it ultimately determined that Qualcomm’s licensing practices didn’t violate antitrust law.  Comments Tags See also 2:11 Phones Components Tech Industrycenter_img Now playing: Watch this: 4 Qualcomm Japan isn’t the only government body that’s investigated Qualcomm. The US, South Korea, China and the European Union are other governments that have scrutinized Qualcomm’s business practices. All have probed whether Qualcomm hurt competition by demanding licensing terms that ultimately forced handset makers to exclusively use its chips. Though many have slapped Qualcomm with fines, none have forced it to change its licensing practices. In China in early 2015, Qualcomm agreed to pay a $975 million fine and lower its licensing fees to settle the dispute in that country. South Korea slapped the company with a $850 million fine the following year, which Qualcomm is appealing. The EU in early 2018 fined Qualcomm $1.23 billion for paying Apple to use only its chips, something Qualcomm also is appealing. And in August of that year, the company reached a settlement with Taiwan, where the country would keep the $93 million Qualcomm had paid, but the company wouldn’t owe anything more.In January, Qualcomm and the US Federal Trade Commission met in a San Jose, California, courtroom to battle over an antitrust case. The FTC has accused Qualcomm of operating a monopoly in wireless chips, forcing customers like Apple to work with it exclusively and charging excessive licensing fees for its technology. The case is now in a judge’s hands. At the same time, Qualcomm is battling its former major customer, Apple. In January 2017, the iPhone giant sued Qualcomm over its licensing practices. Qualcomm has filed countersuits and also accused Apple of patent infringement. The two have been battling in a San Diego court for the past two weeks over patents, and they’ll meet again in April over the licensing dispute.On Thursday, a judge dealt Qualcomm a blow in the upcoming licensing case. US District Court Judge Gonzalo P. Curiel of the Southern District of California ruled that Apple can keep the billions Qualcomm paid it as part of their 2013 contract. And Qualcomm is still on the hook for payments it stopped making.  Qualcomm-FTC lawsuit: Everything you need to know Qualcomm can’t get back the billions it paid Apple, judge rules What the Apple-Qualcomm battle means for your next iPhone Qualcomm’s licensing practices have been facing scrutiny around the globe.  Shara Tibken/CNET Qualcomm isn’t a monopoly after all, a Japanese regulatory body said Friday, reversing its decision from about a decade ago. The Japan Fair Trade Commission this week canceled a cease-and-desist order from 2009 that affected Qualcomm licensing in Japan, effectively declaring that Qualcomm wasn’t guilty of the charges against it. JFTC officials said the decision is “unusual,” according to a report from Nippon, and that this is the first time it’s revoked a cease-and-desist order since 2012. The decision gives Qualcomm a win as the company awaits a judge’s decision in the US’ probe into its business practices. “We are very gratified to learn that after years of considering the evidence and applicable legal authority, the Japan Fair Trade Commission has concluded there was nothing improper about Qualcomm’s cross-licensing program,” Don Rosenberg, Qualcomm general counsel and executive vice president, said in a statement. “Today’s decision affirms our confidence that once Qualcomm was afforded a full hearing, and actual evidence was considered, the JFTC would find that our cross-licensing program was completely lawful and the product of arms-length, good-faith negotiations with our Japanese licensees.” last_img read more

The Woodlands Symphony Continues Its Resurrection

first_img Share X Listen St.John FlynnConcertmaster Carlo Mauricio (l) and Artistic Director Darryl Bayer (r) of The Woodlands Symphony OrchestraThe Woodlands Symphony Orchestra was originally founded in the early 1990s but was disbanded in 2008.  But now the orchestra has been put back together again and is concluding its Resurrection Season this weekend with a concert, Sunday, May 1st, 7 p.m. at The Woodlands United Methodist Church. It includes Igor Stravinsky‘s Firebird Suite and music from the 25th Anniversary Edition of Zelda, Final Fantasy VII and a suite of selections from Video Games Live. Conducted by Clifton Evans, formerly of Houston’s HSPVA and now director of orchestras at UT Arlington, Sunday’s concert will also include the members of the new Woodlands Area Youth Symphony performing side-by-side with the orchestra for the second half.The orchestra’s artistic director Darryl Bayer and concertmaster Carlo Mauricio talk with Houston Public Media’s St.John Flynn about the Woodlands Symphony rebirth and this weekend’s concert. 00:00 /11:18 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Psychologist Insults Black Fathers at CoParenting Forum

first_imgBy James Wright, Special to the AFRO, jwright@afro.comA leading Black psychologist recently told a conference on co-parenting in the District of Columbia that the role of fathers – particularly African American fathers – is increasingly becoming obsolete.“I take psychology from the real world,” Dr. James Ballard II, told participants at the “Inspiring Fathers, Celebrating Co-Parenting: A Community Conversation and Awards Program” held June 2 at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church. “I am the product of a single mother. When my father got into the picture, there was always a conflict between them. But in my mind I only had one parent to listen to and that was my mother.”Yohance Maqubela and Sunshine Muse, who received the 2018 Co-Parenting Award, are co-parenting their children even though they are divorced. (Courtesy Photo).The conference was organized by Jonetta Rose Barras, a leading District-based journalist who has written books and articles on fatherless daughters; Frank Love, author of How to Gracefully Exit a Relationship; and Wayne Young of Port of Harlem Magazine.Co-parenting is widely defined as adults raising a child even though they are not married. According to statistics compiled by the American Psychology Association 40-50 percent of all marriages in America end up in divorce for a variety of reasons such as conflicts over money, extramarital relationships, career shifts and family issues.In addition to Ballard, A. Scott Bolden, a noted attorney and managing partner at Reed Smith law firm in the District, D.C. Council member Kenyan McDuffie (D-Ward 5), and Hyesook Chung, the District’s deputy mayor for Health and Human Services spoke at the forum.McDuffie talked about growing up in a structured two-parent household in Ward 5 “when there was chaos in D.C.”“I grew up during the crack cocaine epidemic,” he said. He said community support and his parents helped him become an attorney and a member of the D.C. Council.As the father of two daughters, McDuffie said two-parent households offer children more support than a one-parent situation.Bolden spoke extensively about his divorce from his first wife and finding out about a daughter he didn’t know about until she was 19-years-old and pregnant with a child. Bolden said men should be in their children’s lives.“We are still fathers to those children,” he said.  “When I divorced my first wife, I would drive my kids to elementary school every morning, even though it was only two blocks from their house. My kids remember me being there even as 23-year-olds.”Chung said the Bowser administration embraces the idea of co-parenting and is doing what it can to help men and boys of color and homeless families.Ballard, who works as the director of internship training for pre-doctoral students at Interdynamics Inc., in Lanham, Md., said the women’s rights movement has changed the role of men. “Since women’s emancipation, the role of father’s has been in decline,” he said. “The husband has taken on female roles. Male roles have changed and disappeared and the father’s role in a family is no longer necessary.”Barras sharply took issue with Ballard. “Fathers are critical to family and to the community,” she said. “There is no change in the role that fathers should play.”Yohance Maqubela and Sunshine Muse received “The 2018 Co-Parenting Award” for their roles in raising their children even though they live in different cities. Muse was present to receive the award.last_img read more

Capturing the visible and invisible

first_imgAlliance Française de Delhi in association with International Women Photographers Association (IWPA) will present an exhibition titled ‘International Women Photographers Awards- Edition 2018’.The exhibition will be on view from August 4-12 at Galerie Romain Rolland, Alliance Française de Delhi every day from 11 am – 8 pm.It’s an exhibition showcases the works of 11 photographers who have been selected from the 60 short-listed candidates.More than 600 women photographers from 82 countries have submitted their entries to the International Women Photographers Award (IWPA). Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe results demonstrate the outstanding success of the IWPA award around the world as the selected photographers come from the Middle East, Europe, Asia and South America.This exhibition is a display of photographs taken from each photographer’s series. The participants could choose between either the ‘free theme’ or the IWPA theme 2018 ‘Visible/Invisible’.The final list of the selected photographers include names like Loulou Daki – Swedish, Annalisa Natali Murri – Italian, Estelle Lagarde – French, Tahmineh Monzavi – Iranian, Elahe Abdolahaba – Iranian, Alice Mann – South African, Shu-Chen Chen – Taiwanese and Marylise Vigneau – French among others. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveOne of the finalists Constanza Portnoy, a participant from Argentina will be displaying her series titled ‘Force of Life’ in the upcoming exhibition. Her powerful and deeply moving series will portray the lives of people with disabilities.On speaking about her series she says, “I feel excited, honoured and very happy, especially because in Argentina it is very difficult to raise awareness about this issue.”It is unfortunate that the rights of people with disabilities are very vulnerable over there.”last_img read more

Google Daydream powered Lenovo Mirage solo hits the market

first_imgJust when people couldn’t keep up with the excitement of the Oculus Go launched at the Facebook’s F8 conference, Google added fuel to the fire by making Lenovo Mirage Solo, the first stand-alone Daydream VR headset, available for purchase at $399.9. Lenovo Mirage Solo VR headset Let’s have a look at the features that are making this headset all the rage: Self-contained VR Headset What makes this VR headset the talk of the town is that it’s the first stand-alone Daydream VR headset. That means it doesn’t require the excess baggage of connecting the phone and then putting on the headset. All you need to do is, just put the headset on and explore the intriguing VR world sans the wires and the added complexity. The hardware inside resembles that of a mobile device. It has a Snapdragon 835 processor with 4GB RAM, and 64GB of storage. It comes with a long battery life of 2.5 hours making the entire VR experience seamless. It consists of embedded sensors along with a gyroscope, accelerometer, and magnetometer. Also, it has a microSD slot, a USB Type-C port, a power button, volume buttons, and a 3.5mm headphone jack. Position-tracking Technology Lenovo Mirage Solo comes with WorldSense, an outstanding 6 degrees of freedom motion tracking feature that helps you move around freely with headsets on, thereby, making the entire experience more immersive. WorldSense helps remove the need to set up extra sensors. It offers: Two inside-out tracking cameras Built-in proximity sensors that detect the position of nearby objects Display Lenovo Mirage Solo comes with a 5.5-inch LCD display. This is an effort to get rid of the blurring issue that happens as you move from one side to the other in the VR world. The screen has a 2,560 x 1,440-pixel resolution with a 110-degree field of view which is similar to Rift and Vive, thereby, making the VR exploration even more interactive. Design The headset body is primarily matte plastic in white color with accents of black, and gray running through it, and a solid plastic strap that wraps around the head. The Lenovo Mirage solo is a self-contained headset, which has a strong built. Yet some people find it bulky as the majority of the weight resides on the top of a wearer’s forehead. However, it is adjustable as the headset can be brought all the way around your skull. Also, the Display housing keeps the light from coming in without disturbing the image, making the headset easily movable. Sound Lenovo Mirage Solo comes with two microphones, but users need to plug in their own headphones into the 3.5-mm jack as it doesn’t come equipped with in-built speakers. Apart from the above-mentioned features, the Mirage Solo depends on the Daydream library for accessing content. The catalog has more than 350 games and apps with over 70 titles optimized for WorldSense. As you can see, Mirage Solo is not flawless. It suffers from issues such as bulky design, no built-in speakers, and limited library app content. But the pros overpower the cons in this case, and it goes without saying that Lenovo Mirage Solo is here to revolutionize the VR experience. To know more, visit the official Daydream Google Blog Read next Oculus Go, the first stand-alone VR headset arrives! Understanding the hype behind Magic Leap’s New Augmented Reality Headsets Build a Virtual Reality Solar System in Unity for Google Cardboardlast_img read more