Student government hosts fair for freshmen

first_imgThe First Undergraduate Experience in Leadership (FUEL) branch of student government hosted the Freshman Networking Fair on Monday in the Lafortune Ballroom to help first year students connect with various organizations across campus.Sarah Olson Sophomore Dan Hopkinson, co-director of FUEL, said the fair was started three years ago when FUEL was under the leadership of Louis Bertolotti and it has continued to gather positive feedback throughout the years.“ … Especially if you’re a freshman, it’s hard to [join organizations] if you’re not already involved in student government,” he said. “It can be overwhelming, so I think just having an event dedicated to specifically Student Union organizations is helpful in raising awareness for those organizations and what they can do.”Senior Caitlin Hodges, department director for community relations, said freshmen can reach out to her to learn more about jobs and service in the South Bend community. The experience in community relations her department offers can also be a valuable experience for those looking to get involved in local government, she said. “If they’re looking for good exposure even to municipal government, if it’s someone who’s thinking about getting involved in that after graduation in South Bend or another city — this is a really good department for that,” Hodges said. Freshman Alison O’Neil, who is involved with community relations, said she has enjoyed her experience, which allows her to venture into the South Bend community.“This is my first experience with student government,” O’Neil said. “ … It’s a nice chance to get out of the Notre Dame bubble, get involved in the community and really make a difference.”Liz Feeley, co-chair of Hall President’s Council (HPC), said freshmen can also begin becoming involved with the hall council organizations within their own dorms.“When they come in their freshmen year [and want to become involved with HPC], it’s probably most helpful if they get involved in hall council first, because HPC is made up of current hall presidents,” Feeley said. “It’s kind of hard to run, unless you have one year under your belt … We would definitely recommend hall council, and even running for a commissioner’s position.”Christina Fernandez, co-chair of the HPC, said freshmen can shadow their upperclassmen hall presidents to learn more about the responsibilities of the position “Some halls have junior commissioner positions, so [freshmen] can learn how to be a commissioner under a sophomore and learn the ropes of programming and what we do at events,” Fernandez said. “But aside from that, freshmen can actually run for president at the end of their freshmen year to be hall president during their sophomore year, so we have a few of the halls who have sophomore presidents.”Freshman Abby Campbell, a member of FUEL, said she learned more about student government through the fair.“I discovered that the school offers a free New York Times subscription, which I sort of knew but I had no idea how to take advantage of it,” Campbell said. “Also, I didn’t know that student government was the group that worked on the debate this year and also [kept] track of who voted for who in the [mock] election, which is pretty cool.”Freshman Brittani West said she was particularly interested in the opportunities which Diversity Council offered.“I checked out Diversity Council, so that was pretty interesting,” West said. “I know that the majority of students here are white, so not being white, I wanted to check that out, for sure. I’m really glad they’re offering opportunities for me to be a part of that council.”Freshman Taylor Schmidt said he learned about future events that are aimed at fostering community between residence halls. “There’s going to be a campus-wide event that entails competitions with each dorm … you can go to different dorms for activities; [for example,] you can do dunk tanks at Duncan Hall or make a cupcake at Badin,” Schmidt said.Hodges said he hoped the fair would help spread overall awareness of the opportunities offered by student government.“Student Union is the largest organization that is on campus and it can do so much,” Hodges said. “It can be overwhelming so I think just having an event dedicated to specifically Student Union organizations is helpful in raising awareness for those organizations and what they can do.”Tags: fair, freshmen, networking, Student Unionlast_img read more

More affordable housing coming, says Moody’s Investors Service

first_imgHousing affordability in Brisbane continues to shine, with 23 per cent of double income households funds needed to service mortgages. Picture: AAP Image/Dan Peled.HOUSING affordability was now better across the country than it has averaged over the last 10 years, according to the latest Moody’s Investors Service report.Moody’s vice president and senior analyst Alena Chen said homes with two income earners with an 80 per cent loan-to-value mortgage needed 28.2 per cent of their monthly income to meet monthly mortgage repayments in March 2018.That was down marginally from 28.3 per cent in March 2017 and 28.7 per cent in September 2018. 5 REASONS WHY RATES WON’T RISE UNTIL 2020 INTEREST RATES TO HOLD ‘UNTIL 2020’ FREE: GET REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO INBOX Brisbane continues to shine in the affordability stakes, coming in better than the national average with a marginal improvement in March (down 0.6 percentage point to 23 per cent).Sydney had the most marked change, down 2.5 percentage points to 35.8 per cent after housing prices fell 3.1 per cent over the year to March.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus19 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market19 hours agoPerth was down 1 percentage point to 19.2 per cent, after seeing 3.6 per cent fall in housing prices over the year to March 2018.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:04Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:04 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenMay 1: Real Estate Market Wrap08:04Melbourne had the worst deterioration in housing affordability, with buyers needing 1.9 percentage points more of their dual incomes to service their mortgages (32 per cent of income) after prices jumped 11.7 per cent over the year to March 2018.Adelaide, where housing prices rose 4.2 per cent, saw buyers needing 0.4 percentage point more of income to service mortgages (22.9 per cent of income).Ms Chen said softening housing market conditions would ensure that housing affordability improved moderately through the rest of 2018.“Housing affordability for new mortgage borrowers — measured as the proportion of household income needed to meet mortgage repayments — improved marginally on average across Australia over the year to March 2018, because lower interest rates and moderate income growth outstripped the effect of higher housing prices,” she said.“Looking at the rest of 2018, we expect housing affordability to continue to improve moderately on average because of softening housing market conditions, particularly in Sydney and to a lesser extent Melbourne.” FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOKlast_img read more