10 months agoLiverpool legend Fowler keen on Bristol Rovers job

first_imgLiverpool legend Fowler keen on Bristol Rovers jobby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool legend Robbie Fowler is keen on the Bristol Rovers job.Fowler has moved to declare his interest in the post at the Memorial Stadium which became available when Darrell Clarke left earlier this week.Clarke had been at the club for four and a half years but left with them 21st in League One and four points from safety.“I’ve thrown in a few [CVs] over the years, still waiting for a call,” Fowler told Soccer AM.“Bristol Rovers has obviously come up; would I be interested? Of course I would!“I went over to Thailand and loved being a manager.”People in this country think I’m inexperienced but I’ve done it before.“I came home, did all my badges, I’m properly, properly qualified, so I think it’s just a case of watch this space.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Jim Harbaugh Absolutely Torches NCAA, Rival Conferences In Sports Illustrated Interview

first_imgJim Harbaugh winces as he looks on from the sideline.BLOOMINGTON, IN – OCTOBER 14: Jim Harbaugh the head coach of the Michigan Wolverines watches the action during the game against the Indiana Hoosiers at Memorial Stadium on October 14, 2017 in Bloomington, Indiana. (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images) Jim HarbaughYouTube/Jim HarbaughWe knew that Jim Harbaugh would respond to the recent NCAA vote to ban satellite camps. That was a certainty. Even with the Michigan head coach’s history of lashing out, we wouldn’t have predicted just how hard Harbaugh swung back in response. In an interview with Sports Illustrated‘s Michael Rosenberg, Harbaugh slams the NCAA, and even the term “student-athlete” in light of the vote.As Harbaugh tells SI : “The incompetence of the NCAA has reared its ugly head yet again.” …Harbaugh says the ruling was “knee-jerk … like somebody was shaving in the morning, cut themselves when they were shaving and said, ‘Let’s just ban satellite camps.’“I mean, what’s it based on? A survey? There wasn’t a lot of discussion or study. What are the facts? What are the perils and merits of making that decision? It just seemed lacking in that regard.”Satellite camps are no new concept, but Harbaugh put a special emphasis on them after taking over at Michigan, with a specific target on the Southeast, home of many ACC and SEC power programs.“During the NCAA basketball tournament we discuss the term ‘student-athlete’ ad nauseam in promoting our governing institution and our member institutions. Then, when we have an opportunity to truly promote the ‘student-athlete’ with a concept shared by educators and football men from all backgrounds, our leadership goes into hiding.“I suggest we drop the term ‘student-athlete’ for consistency.”Harbaugh wasn’t afraid to take targeted swipes at rival coaches either, specifically Ole Miss head coach Hugh Freeze who recently defended the decision.“It seems to be outrage by the SEC and ACC,” Harbaugh says. “They power-brokered that out … the image that comes to my mind is guys in a back room smoking cigars, doing what they perceive is best for them. It certainly isn’t the best thing for the youngsters. It’s not the best thing for the student-athletes.”Harbaugh saw Ole Miss coach Hugh Freeze say, “I’m away from my family enough, and I just did not want to go,” and it did not sit well with him.Says Harbaugh: “You’ve got a guy sitting in a big house, making $5 million a year, saying he does not want to sacrifice his time. That is not a kindred spirit to me. What most of these coaches are saying is they don’t want to work harder.” While some may assume Harbaugh is the coach affected most, he’s done a great job at Michigan so far, and that program rarely needs help on the recruiting trail. He’ll get his players. This really hurts small schools that aren’t in talent-rich areas this most, and players who aren’t in position to receive the exposure that those in places like Florida, Georgia, and Texas receive. We’ll see if Harbaugh’s complaints hold real weight, or if they will just fall on deaf ears.[Campus Rush]last_img read more

Video: Watch Nick Saban Get Heated About Satellite Camps, Need For CFB Commissioner

first_imgNick Saban gets heated at the podium.Alabama head coach Nick Saban got a little heated during somewhat of a rant about satellite football camps and the need for a college football commissioner. Simply against the idea of satellite football camps, and with little belief in the positive narrative surrounding them, Saban let loose Tuesday afternoon in front of the media at the SEC Spring Meetings. As usual, AL.com was on the scene and posted the video to YouTube. AL.com did a terrific job describing the scene as Saban went off, and you can watch their video in its entirety here.last_img read more

Clarksons Contracting Activity Drops to 30Year Low

first_imgzoom The previous year was very weak for newbuild ordering as contracting activity fell to its lowest level in over 30 years in numerical and tonnage terms, according to Clarkson Research.Low levels of newbuild demand have continued to limit ordering across the majority of vessel sectors, and the majority of shipyards have struggled to win orders. However, record ordering activity in the cruise and passenger ferry sectors provided “a degree of positivity” for European yards in 2016.The 480 vessels reported ordered in 2016 represent the lowest level of newbuild contracting in over 20 years. While ordering in the containership and tanker sectors declined, the 48 and 46 vessels that were contracted in the bulker and offshore sectors respectively in 2016 represented record lows.The orders that were placed in 2016 were also smaller when compared to 2015, with owners contracting vessels as single units or in pairs. There were only 10 contracts placed for 5 vessels or more in 2016, compared to 63 contracts in 2015. The number of yards reported to have taken an order for at least one vessel (1,000+ GT) in 2016 fell to just 126, down 47% from last year’s total of 238 yards.A total of 44 Chinese yards were reported to have secured 212 orders of a combined 40 million CGT in 2016, representing a 66% y-o-y decrease in contracting volumes in CGT terms.Eleven South Korean yards were reported to have taken orders for 59 ships of 17.8 million CGT in 2016, down 83% y-o-y in CGT terms, while nineteen Japanese yards reportedly took 64 orders in 2016, and contracting levels declined 89% y-o-y to 1.3 million CGT.Meanwhile, European shipyards secured a reported 93 orders of a combined 3.4 million CGT in 2016. This is the second largest volume of orders in terms of CGT in 2016 and placed European yards ahead of their South Korean and Japanese counterparts for the first time since 1999.Ordering at European yards in 2016 decreased 29% in numerical terms from 2015 levels, however, in terms of CGT contracting increased by 33% y-o-y. This was greatly assisted by record newbuild interest in the cruise and passenger ferry sectors in 2016 and these vessel types account for 83% of the total CGT ordered at European yards in 2016. 15 orders for large cruise ships (100,000+ GT) accounted for 61% of orders in CGT terms. Of the 35 European yards reported to have taken an order in 2016, only seven won a contract in this sector.The weak newbuild ordering “has been felt across most vessel sectors and by most shipbuilders,” according to Clarksons.“The big Asian nations all experienced downturns in contracting, though strong cruise ordering supported some European yards, allowing them to ascend the builder rankings. As we begin 2017, yards in most parts of the world will be hoping for a brighter year,” Clarksons said.last_img read more

FBI gave headsup to fraction of Russian hackers US targets

first_imgWASHINGTON – The FBI failed to notify scores of U.S. officials that Russian hackers were trying to break into their personal Gmail accounts despite having evidence for at least a year that the targets were in the Kremlin’s crosshairs, The Associated Press has found.Nearly 80 interviews with Americans targeted by Fancy Bear, a Russian government-aligned cyberespionage group, turned up only two cases in which the FBI had provided a heads-up. Even senior policymakers discovered they were targets only when the AP told them, a situation some described as bizarre and dispiriting.“It’s utterly confounding,” said Philip Reiner, a former senior director at the National Security Council, who was notified by the AP that he was targeted in 2015. “You’ve got to tell your people. You’ve got to protect your people.”FBI policy calls for notifying victims, whether individuals or groups, to help thwart both ongoing and future hacking attempts. The policy, which was disclosed in a lawsuit filed earlier this year against the FBI by the non-profit Electronic Privacy Information Center, says that notification should be considered “even when it may interfere with another investigation or (intelligence) operation.”Last week, the FBI declined to discuss its investigation into Fancy Bear’s spying campaign, but did provide a statement that said in part: “The FBI routinely notifies individuals and organizations of potential threat information.”Three people familiar with the matter — including a current and a former government official — said the FBI has known for more than a year the details of Fancy Bear’s attempts to break into Gmail inboxes. A senior FBI official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the hacking operation because of its sensitivity, declined to comment on when it received the target list, but said that the bureau was overwhelmed by the sheer number of attempted hacks.“It’s a matter of triaging to the best of our ability the volume of the targets who are out there,” he said.In the face of a tidal wave of malicious phishing attempts, the FBI sometimes passes on information about the attacks to service providers and companies, who can then relay information to clients or employees, he added.The AP did its own triage, dedicating two months and a small team of reporters to go through a hit list of Fancy Bear targets provided by the cybersecurity firm Secureworks.Previous AP investigations based on the list have shown how Fancy Bear worked in close alignment with the Kremlin’s interests to steal tens of thousands of emails from the Democratic Party . The hacking campaign disrupted the 2016 U.S. election and cast a shadow over the presidency of Donald Trump, whom U.S. intelligence agencies say the hackers were trying to help . The Russian government has denied interfering in the American election.The Secureworks list comprises 19,000 lines of targeting data . Going through it, the AP identified more than 500 U.S.-based people or groups and reached out to more than 190 of them, interviewing nearly 80 about their experiences.Many were long-retired, but about one-quarter were still in government or held security clearances at the time they were targeted. Only two told the AP they learned of the hacking attempts on their personal Gmail accounts from the FBI. A few more were contacted by the FBI after their emails were published in the torrent of leaks that coursed through last year’s electoral contest. But to this day, some leak victims have not heard from the bureau at all.Charles Sowell, who previously worked as a senior administrator in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence and was targeted by Fancy Bear two years ago, said there was no reason the FBI couldn’t do the same work the AP did.“It’s absolutely not OK for them to use an excuse that there’s too much data,” Sowell said. “Would that hold water if there were a serial killer investigation, and people were calling in tips left and right, and they were holding up their hands and saying, ‘It’s too much’? That’s ridiculous.”___“IT’S CURIOUS”The AP found few traces of the bureau’s inquiry as it launched its own investigation two months ago.In October, two AP journalists visited THCServers.com , a brightly lit, family-run internet company on the former grounds of a communist-era chicken farm outside the Romanian city of Craiova. That’s where someone registered DCLeaks.com, the first of three websites to publish caches of emails belonging to Democrats and other U.S. officials in mid-2016.DCLeaks was clearly linked to Fancy Bear. Previous AP reporting found that all but one of the site’s victims had been targeted by the hacking group before their emails were dumped online.Yet THC founder Catalin Florica said he was never approached by law enforcement.“It’s curious,” Florica said. “You are the first ones that contact us.”THC merely registered the site, a simple process that typically takes only a few minutes. But the reaction was similar at the Kuala Lumpur offices of the Malaysian web company Shinjiru Technology , which hosted DCLeaks’ stolen files for the duration of the electoral campaign.The company’s chief executive, Terence Choong, said he had never heard of DCLeaks until the AP contacted him.“What is the issue with it?” he asked.Questions over the FBI’s handling of Fancy Bear’s broad hacking sweep date to March 2016, when agents arrived unannounced at Hillary Clinton’s headquarters in Brooklyn to warn her campaign about a surge of rogue, password-stealing emails.The agents offered little more than generic security tips the campaign had already put into practice and refused to say who they thought was behind the attempted intrusions, according to a person who was there and spoke on condition of anonymity because the conversation was meant to be confidential.Questions emerged again after it was revealed that the FBI never took custody of the Democratic National Committee’s computer server after it was penetrated by Fancy Bear in April 2016. Former FBI Director James Comey testified this year that the FBI worked off a copy of the server, which he described as an “appropriate substitute.”___“MAKES ME SAD”Retired Maj. James Phillips was one of the first people to have the contents of his inbox published by DCLeaks when the website made its June 2016 debut.But the Army veteran said he didn’t realize his personal emails were “flapping in the breeze” until a journalist phoned him two months later.“The fact that a reporter told me about DCLeaks kind of makes me sad,” he said. “I wish it had been a government source.”Phillips’ story would be repeated again and again as the AP spoke to officials from the National Defence University in Washington to the North American Aerospace Defence Command in Colorado.Among them: a former head of the Defence Intelligence Agency, retired Lt. Gen. Patrick Hughes; a former head of Air Force Intelligence, retired Lt. Gen. David Deptula; a former defence undersecretary, Eric Edelman; and a former director of cybersecurity for the Air Force, retired Lt. Gen. Mark Schissler.Retired Maj. Gen. Brian Keller, a former director of military support at the Geospatial Intelligence Agency, was not informed, even after DCLeaks posted his emails to the internet. In a telephone call with AP, Keller said he still wasn’t clear on what had happened, who had hacked him or whether his data was still at risk.“Should I be worried or alarmed or anything?” asked Keller, who left the spy satellite agency in 2010 and now works in private industry.Not all the interviewees felt the FBI had a responsibility to alert them.“Perhaps optimistically, I have to conclude that a risk analysis was done and I was not considered a high enough risk to justify making contact,” said a former Air Force chief of staff, retired Gen. Norton Schwartz, who was targeted by Fancy Bear in 2015.Others argued that the FBI may have wanted to avoid tipping the hackers off or that there were too many people to notify.“The expectation that the government is going to protect everyone and go back to everyone is false,” said Nicholas Eftimiades, a retired senior technical officer at the Defence Intelligence Agency who teaches homeland security at Pennsylvania State University in Harrisburg and was himself among the targets.But the government is supposed to try, said Michael Daniel, who served as President Barack Obama’s White House cybersecurity co-ordinator.Daniel wouldn’t comment directly on why so many Fancy Bear targets weren’t warned in this case, but he said the issue of how and when to notify people “frankly still needs more work.”___“CLOAK-AND-DAGGER”In the absence of any official warning, some of those contacted by AP brushed off the idea that they were taken in by a foreign power’s intelligence service.“I don’t open anything I don’t recognize,” said Joseph Barnard, who headed the personnel recovery branch of the Air Force’s Air Combat Command.That may well be true of Barnard; Secureworks’ data suggests he never clicked the malicious link sent to him in June 2015. But it isn’t true of everyone.An AP analysis of the data suggests that out of 312 U.S. military and government figures targeted by Fancy Bear, 131 clicked the links sent to them. That could mean that as many as 2 in 5 came perilously close to handing over their passwords.It’s not clear how many gave up their credentials in the end or what the hackers may have acquired.Some of those accounts hold emails that go back years, when even many of the retired officials still occupied sensitive posts.Overwhelmingly, interviewees told AP they kept classified material out of their Gmail inboxes, but intelligence experts said Russian spies could use personal correspondence as a springboard for further hacking, recruitment or even blackmail.“You start to have information you might be able to leverage against that person,” said Sina Beaghley, a researcher at the RAND Corp. who served on the NSC until 2014.In the few cases where the FBI did warn targets, they were sometimes left little wiser about what was going on or what to do.Rob “Butch” Bracknell, a 20-year military veteran who now works in Norfolk, Virginia, said an FBI agent visited him about a year ago to examine his emails and warn him that a “foreign actor” was trying to break into his account.“He was real cloak-and-dagger about it,” Bracknell said. “He came here to my work, wrote in his little notebook and away he went.”Left to fend for themselves, some targets have been improvising their cybersecurity.Retired Gen. Roger A. Brady, who was responsible for American nuclear weapons in Europe as part of his past role as commander of the U.S. Air Force there, turned to Apple support this year when he noticed something suspicious on his computer. Hughes, a former DIA head, said he had his hard drive replaced by the “Geek Squad” at a Best Buy in Florida after his machine began behaving strangely. Keller, the former senior spy satellite official, said it was his son who told him his emails had been posted to the web after getting a Google alert in June 2016.A former U.S. ambassador to Russia, Michael McFaul, who like many others was repeatedly targeted by Fancy Bear but has yet to receive any warning from the FBI, said the lacklustre response risked something worse than last year’s parade of leaks.“Our government needs to be taking greater responsibility to defend its citizens in both the physical and cyber worlds, now, before a cyberattack produces an even more catastrophic outcome than we have already experienced,” McFaul said.___Donn reported from Plymouth, Massachusetts. Associated Press writers Vadim Ghirda in Carcea, Romania, Chad Day in Washington, Frank Bajak in Houston, Justin Myers in Chicago and Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed to this report.___Satter, Donn and Butler can be reached at:http://raphaelsatter.com , https://twitter.com/jadonn7 and https://twitter.com/desmondbutler___EDITOR’S NOTE — Raphael Satter’s father, David Satter, is an author and Russia specialist who has been critical of the Kremlin. His emails were published last year by hackers and his account is on Secureworks’ list of Fancy Bear targets. He was not notified by the FBI.EDITOR’S NOTE _ One in a series of stories on the findings of an Associated Press investigation of the Russian hackers who disrupted the U.S. presidential election in 2016last_img read more

US energy official sees great promise in eastern Med

first_imgNICOSIA, Cyprus — A U.S. State Department official says Washington sees “great promise” in developing energy resources in the eastern Mediterranean as ExxonMobil began exploratory drilling off Cyprus’ southwestern coast.Francis Fannon, the Assistant Secretary of State responsible for energy matters, says Washington sees existing and potential gas deposits in the east Mediterranean as a catalyst for regional co-operation and economic development.He said the U.S. will continue advancing energy development in the region as a priority and repeated support for Cyprus’ own hydrocarbons search.Turkey strongly objects to exploratory drilling off Cyprus because it claims it infringes its own rights and those of breakaway Turkish Cypriots to the ethnically split island nation’s natural resources.Fannon was in Cyprus Friday as part of a three-nation visit that includes Israel and Egypt.The Associated Presslast_img read more

Whats in a name 5G wireless claims but no real network

first_imgNEW YORK — 5G E? 5G Plus? 5G Ultrawideband? Will the real 5G please stand up?AT&T has drawn ridicule by relabeling the network used by some of its phones as “5G E” to signal that the next-generation wireless network is here. Problem is, phones capable of connecting to 5G aren’t coming for another few months, and a national 5G network won’t be deployed until 2020 or 2021.But Verizon, which complained Tuesday about AT&T’s move, did something similar when it launched a residential wireless service with the 5G moniker using its own proprietary technology. Although there are now industry standards specifying exactly what 5G networks must meet, dubbed “5G NR,” there are still some grey areas, particularly when it comes to marketing. Carriers are using all tools at their disposal as they race to try to convince consumers they’ll be “first” with 5G.A new generation of wireless network comes along every several years, so the stakes are high for carriers to establish their dominance. When it’s fully deployed, the “5G” network is expected to give mobile users faster speeds for video, self-driving cars and connected devices at home as demand for these ramps up.IDC analyst Jason Leigh said labeling 5G is a “battle between marketers and engineers,” as they try to balance hype and reality.There’s a history of carriers being murky about network claims. AT&T, T-Mobile and Sprint started calling an enhanced 3G network 4G in the early 2010s. There’s more pushback this time because people are now more aware of what a next-generation network can do.AT&T said in December that it would offer a “5G Evolution” service to some of its newest Android phones in 400 markets. The “5G Evolution” service is essentially the existing 4G network with some added features that can boost speeds, technology similar to what Verizon and T-Mobile have also rolled out under different names. That’s separate from the standards-based 5G network that AT&T and others are building.Bob O’Donnell from Technalysis Research said AT&T’s “5G E” network may be slightly faster than the current 4G service but it is more like “4.5G” than “5G.”“It’s not really 5G, and it’s very confusing to people,” he said. “I’m not very sure what the logic was to be honest.”On Tuesday, Verizon launched a marketing offensive pushing back on the “5G E” label with full-page ads in The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and elsewhere.“The potential to over-hype and under-deliver on the 5G promise is a temptation that the wireless industry must resist,” Verizon chief technology officer Kyle Malady wrote in the ad. Malady also said Verizon wouldn’t “call our 4G network a 5G network if customers don’t experience a performance or capability upgrade that only 5G can deliver.”Still, Verizon itself rolled out a 5G wireless broadband service in four cities in October using its own proprietary technology rather than industry-based standards. This residential service is meant to compete with cable rather than offer cellular connectivity outside the home. Verizon plans to update the equipment once standards-based devices are available, but there’s no timeline for that.Verizon spokesman Kevin King said comparing Verizon’s 5G service to AT&T’s move is a mistake because Verizon has been clear that it wasn’t using standards-compliant equipment right away.T-Mobile CEO John Legere, meanwhile, tweeted a tongue-in-cheek video showing T-Mobile’s LTE network symbol on a phone replaced with a piece of tape reading “9G.”AT&T declined to comment about the pushback.While there aren’t any legal ramifications in calling AT&T’s latest network 5G E, there’s a risk in alienating customers, said Leigh, the IDC analyst.“They’re entitled to call their product whatever they want,” Leigh said. “Ultimately they’ll have to deal with any confusion from a customer perspective.”Mae Anderson, The Associated Presslast_img read more

Taylor to begin engaging with ISPs about getting fibre optic Internet access

first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. — Staff at the District of Taylor are going to begin engaging with Internet service providers in the near future about the possibility of getting fibre optic internet access in their community.At Tuesday’s District council meeting, a motion by Mayor Rob Fraser to have staff start communicating with both Telus and Shaw about the potential for building fibre optic access to the community. The motion stemmed from Council adopting its April 3rd correspondence list.  Mayor Fraser said that he was inspired to bring the issue of fibre optic internet access after officials with Telus gave a presentation to the Peace River Regional District Board on March 8th about the future of fibre optic connectivity in the region.In 2016, Telus unveiled its PureFibre internet access in both Fort St. John and Dawson Creek, with residents in Charlie Lake and Hudson’s Hope getting access to the service shortly thereafter. The vast majority of PureFibre service is located on the South Coast, though other Northern B.C. communities such as Quesnel and Williams Lake have also been connected. Fraser explained that he has made inquiries himself with ISPs, but has not heard back on whether there is a fibre optic line that passes through, but doesn’t provide service to Taylor. He explained that the District needs to find out where the closest fibre optic line is, and what the cost would be to get a fibre line installed over the “last mile” to District residents.“If we want to see fibre optics in Taylor, we are going to have to start interacting with these folks. When it comes to keeping people in your community and attracting businesses that are part of this knowledge-based economy where they do everything over the computer, if you do not have fibre optic ability, you will not be able to attract people and keep them there. If it’s not already, it’s going to become an infrastructure that’s a requirement. I don’t believe we should let ourselves be isolated from this.”last_img read more

Fort St John RCMP investigating possible domestic dispute

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The Fort St. John RCMP are investigating a possible domestic dispute that happened on August 5, 2019.The RCMP have just released information about an incident on August 5, 2019, at 12:45 p.m.  The RCMP received a call of a possible domestic dispute in progress near the intersection of Highway 97 and 86 street in Fort St. John.The 911 report said that a man in a gold coloured SUV was parked on the side of the southbound lane of Highway 97 north.  The man exited the vehicle, went around to the passenger side, was yelling at and appeared to be striking a female passenger then trying to pull her out of the vehicle.  The man then got back into the SUV and drove southbound on Highway 97, in the direction of Taylor, B.C. The man is described as:caucasian,tall and skinny,scruffy blonde hair,wearing a t-shirt and blue jeans.The passenger is described as:female,caucasian,dark curly hair.The Fort St John RCMP continue to investigate and are requesting any witnesses or persons who may have dashcam video, please contact the Fort St John RCMP at 250-787-8100.Should you wish to remain anonymous, please call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS (8477) or submit a tip online at www.crimestoppersnebc.ca.last_img read more

Green spaces may help you trust strangers

first_imgGreen spaces and colourful urban design elements may lead to higher levels of happiness, greater trust of strangers and environmental stewardship than locations without those amenities, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Cities and Health, suggests that simple, inexpensive urban design interventions can increase well-being and social connections among city residents. “The urban design interventions we studied are relatively simple and low-cost, but show great potential to improve individuals’ emotional and social lives,” said Hanna Negami, a PhD candidate at the University of Waterloo in Canada. “Something as simple as adding greenery to a concrete lane or painting a rainbow crosswalk could help to enrich urban public spaces,” Negami said. For the study, participants were taken on walking tours of Vancouver’s West End neighbourhood and asked to complete a questionnaire via a smartphone application at six stops. This included a pair of laneways (one green, one concrete), crosswalks (one painted rainbow, one standard zebra), and a pair of greenspaces (one wild community garden and one manicured greenspace). The addition of greenspace and place-making initiatives can help promote social connections for citizens, and help to mitigate social isolation, researchers said. They hope that these findings will ultimately help improve the experiences of people living in cities. “We know that the design of a city has direct, measurable, psychological impact on its citizens,” says Colin Ellard, a professor at the University of Waterloo. “We have been able to show how such impact can be measured and what it can tell us about good, psychologically sustainable design,” Ellard said.last_img read more