Marseille start negotiations with Aston Villa for wantaway midfielder

first_imgMarseille have begun negotiations with Aston Villa over a loan move for Idrissa Gueye.The midfielder only moved to Villa Park last summer after spending five years with Lille.But the 26-year-old could already be on his way back to France as, according to RMC, Marseille want to take him on loan.The Ligue 1 club have now contacted Villa and the pair have begun talks ahead of a summer switch.Gueye is keen to leave Villa after they were relegated to the Championship and the club are happy to let him go as they look to reduce their wage bill. Idrissa Gueye is looking to leave Aston Villa this summer 1last_img read more

CBC LAUNCHES CBC BREAKING BARRIERS FILM FUND IN SUPPORT OF UNDERREPRESENTED CANADIAN

first_imgAdvertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement About CBC/Radio-CanadaCBC/Radio-Canada is Canada’s national public broadcaster and one of its largest cultural institutions. We are Canada’s trusted source of news, information and Canadian entertainment. Deeply rooted in communities all across the country, CBC/Radio-Canada offers diverse content in English, French and eight Indigenous languages. We also provide international news and information from a uniquely Canadian perspective. Carolle Brabant, executive director, Telefilm Canada, added: “Congratulations to the CBC for taking this important step. Telefilm is committed to financially supporting features chosen by the CBC Breaking Barriers Film Fund.  As two national cultural agencies, both organizations must take a leadership role in addressing diversity in our industry. CBC’s Breaking Barriers Film Fund complements our own objective, to have by 2020, a feature film portfolio that better reflects Canada’s diverse population.”CBC will make an initial investment of at least $7.5 million in the CBC Breaking Barriers Film Fund over the next three years. The Fund will complement CBC’s existing and continued commitment to Canadian film, including licensing more than 50 Canadian feature films since 2014. For application guidelines and details regarding CBC’s rights expectations please visit http://www.cbc.ca/breakingbarriers/. Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement CBC today announced the CBC Breaking Barriers Film Fund in support of underrepresented Canadian creators, offering critical resources to filmmakers struggling to make their unique voices heard. With the new fund, CBC will help finance English-language feature film projects that are written or directed by Canadian women, Indigenous persons, visible minorities and persons with a disability who have had at least one feature-length film showcased at a recognized film festival. Submissions are now being accepted with no formal deadlines.  Further information is available at http://www.cbc.ca/breakingbarriers/.“With the CBC Breaking Barriers Film Fund, we are striving to make a meaningful difference by supporting underrepresented creators directly and investing in their feature films,” said Heather Conway, executive vice-president, English Services, CBC. “This new model will offer vital resources to writers and directors who have historically been at a disadvantage in accessing financing, and will ensure their films are promoted to much broader audiences in Canada through distribution on CBC’s television and digital platforms.”To qualify for the CBC Breaking Barriers Film Fund, projects must be in a fictional genre, have an existing first draft script and not yet be in production. Eligible applicants are invited to apply for funding of either 10 or 20 percent of the film’s proposed budget (capped at $1 million for 10 percent projects and $2 million for 20 percent projects). Eligible projects will be judged solely on creative merit. Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

THE HANDMAIDS TALE GAVE US THE AUNT LYDIA BACKSTORY WE DESERVE

first_imgAdvertisement THE HANDMAID’S TALE PULLS BACK THE CURTAIN ON AUNT LYDIA’S PASTAfter three seasons, fans of The Handmaid’s Tale are finally getting what they’ve waited for: a flashback-heavy dive into Aunt Lydia’s life, revealing how a former family-court lawyer turned school teacher became a Gilead-abiding taskmaster. But ahead of this week’s episode, “Unfit,” no one was more excited and anxious to learn the backstory of the show’s evil stepmother than Ann Dowd, who won an Emmy playing Aunt Lydia in the first season and has waited 31 episodes to get the character out of her sadistic auntie uniform.In “Unfit,” viewers see a seemingly softer Lydia wearing makeup and blown-out hair, getting close with a student and his young single mother, flirting with her boss, and even showing off some of her karaoke moves. It’s a stark contrast to the Aunt Lydia behind several of the show’s most disturbing moments, including a mass hanging in the second season. Until it isn’t. READ MORE Facebook Login/Register With: Twitter THE HANDMAID’S TALE: INSIDE AUNT LYDIA’S ILLUMINATING FLASHBACK EPISODEDid The Handmaid’s Tale really need to fill out Aunt Lydia’s backstory? That’s debatable. Capsule episodes like Wednesday’s—which looked back on a time when Gilead’s dictatorial den mother worked as an elementary school teacher—can add depth to a character, providing context for the way they behave in the future. On the other hand, this series has a history of treating its villains with kid gloves—and when someone has done as much damage as Aunt Lydia, it’s hard to drum up much empathy for them, even after learning how they got to be the way they are.But even now, Ann Dowd feels for her character. “I love her deeply,” she said in an interview about this week’s Handmaid’s Tale. “I hope for the best for her, and I think there’s reasons why she is the way she is.” This episode, Dowd believes, is key to understanding the character—as well as how she’s come to align herself with a monstrous regime like Gilead. READ MORE‘THE HANDMAID’S TALE’: ANN DOWD ON AUNT LYDIA’S PRE-GILEAD PAST AND VULNERABLE PRESENTIn season two, The Handmaid’s Tale came to a shocking close when Emily unexpectedly stabbed Lydia in the back before pushing her down the stairs of Commander Lawrence’s (Bradley Whitford) house. It appeared that she had been killed off, much to the shock of audiences, who’d grown to love and hate the unflinching den mother. Only two seasons in, Lydia had quickly become a fan favorite thanks to Dowd’s layered performance, showing her character’s torment over only wanting the best for her handmaids while maintaining an unflinching dedication to the rules “under his eye.”Luckily for fans and Dowd alike, the producers quickly made it clear that Lydia wasn’t going anywhere. “I’m not a dummy. I know what happens when someone opens a script and sees they get stabbed in the back by Rory Gilmore,” jokes creator Bruce Miller, who wrote Dowd an email before she read the script to let her know that her character doesn’t die and would be returning for season three. “Which was very kind,” Dowd says.  READ MORE Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment ‘THE HANDMAID’S TALE’ GAVE US THE AUNT LYDIA BACKSTORY WE DESERVEBlessed be the fruit loops. We can’t help but repeat that little handmaids mantra after the latest episode of The Handmaid’s Tale (Sundays, 9 p.m. ET, Crave) and everything that it rolled out. Between the fallout at Loaves and Fishes and the oh-so-anticipated Aunt Lydia (Ann Dowd) backstory, things are not looking good for June (Elisabeth Moss), her future in Gilead, or her overall sanity right now.The episode, “Unfit” was basically what Mean Girls would look like if it were set in Gilead. June and the other handmaids completely ostracized Ofmatthew (Ashleigh LaThrop) after she ratted out June’s plot to see her daughter, and it derailed her. Pregnancy does strange things to a person, but to be pregnant in Gilead, to have a large group of women hate on you (for doing what’s expected of you), to witness the birth of a stillborn, and then to sit in the centre of Aunt Lydia’s hate circle is… well, a lot. For anyone.That overall storyline also speaks to the power June has accumulated in Gilead, and how she’s become an unofficial leader among the handmaids. If you ask us, she’s not using that power very well. We’d even go so far as to call her unhinged at this particular point in the series, a fact that she herself acknowledged when she spoke about understanding Emily (Alexis Bledel) and why she ran over a guard and pushed Aunt Lydia down the stairs. Think about it: what would June do if she actually got a hold of her daughter at this point? READ MORE Ann Dowd ~ The Handmaid’s Tale (Photos courtesy of Hulu)last_img read more