World Cup 2019: Pakistan need to be at their best vs India, says Waqar Younis

first_imgPakistan must go back to their Champions Trophy triumph for inspiration and then look for early wickets in their World Cup encounter against arch-rivals India, suggests former captain Waqar Younis.Bitter foes India and Pakistan lock horns in the tournament’s one of the most anticipated matches at the Old Trafford on Sunday.”It’s simple – if Pakistan want to stay in the tournament, they have to bring an ‘A-plus’ performance and win that game,” Waqar said in his column for the ICC.”When Pakistan play India it’s always a huge game, but their meeting on Sunday is shaping up to be more crucial than ever.”Pakistan can take inspiration from Champions Trophy final: WaqarWhile he did not read much into India’s all-win record against Pakistan in the World Cup, the pace great urged his country to look up to the title triumph in the 2017 Champions Trophy, where they beat India in the final.”Pakistan have got to take positives out of what they did to India in the final of the ICC Champions Trophy a couple of years ago. They must think positively going into this game.”I hope they have got their best game in the locker for India, who showed against Australia that they are a very fine side,” Waqar, one of the best fast bowlers of his time, said.According to the former captain and coach, picking up early wickets could be key to Pakistan’s chances.”What I have seen in this World Cup so far is that if you don’t pick up early wickets, you’re in trouble. The new ball is so crucial and openers are being more careful in the first ten overs this year,” said Waqar.advertisement”They’re not really going full throttle, they are being a bit more watchful. Once you don’t lose any wickets early on, it becomes easier because the ball doesn’t swing and batting becomes easier.”Waqar believes Pakistan were done in by the new ball, in both batting bowling, against Australia on Wednesday.”It was with the new ball, in both batting and bowling, that I felt Pakistan missed a trick in their entertaining defeat to Australia at Taunton.”Early on, we were not really sharp enough and Sarfaraz Ahmed was not on his toes. Mohammad Amir didn’t get any support from the other end.”Waqar impressed by Amir’s spell vs AustraliaReturning his best ODI figures of 5/30, Amir staged a fine comeback to stop Australia’s charge at 307.”No-one really saw the comeback coming and for that, you have to take your hat off to Amir. Full marks to him for the way he bowled. Even with the new ball, I thought he bowled quite nicely. He could have picked up more than five wickets in the end. He was unfortunate with a couple of nicks early on,” said Waqar.”Pakistan pulled it back very nicely. They were sharp after 25 overs and started picking up wickets. They found the right lengths.”His praise for Amir, who was not initially included in Pakistan’s World Cup squad, did not end there.”Amir bowled superbly. He showed us all his cutters, variations and short-pitched deliveries. I think we all know Amir is mentally very, very strong. He showed once again that class is permanent he is no doubt a match-winner.”Regarding team combination, Waqar felt there could be changes for Sunday’s game.”It may be that Mickey Arthur looks at changing the team for Sunday. I spoke to Mickey in Taunton and he is thinking in terms of horses for courses, and I agree with him to an extent.”The pitch there was good for pacers and he rightly went with four of them. The issue was not the nature of the plan, but the execution.”Waqar was in favour of dropping spin-bowling all-rounder Shoaib Malik.”Shadab is the key man in this side and I think they will look to bring him back against India. They might go for five bowlers, use four pacers and Shadab and drop someone like Shoaib Malik,” he said.”Going from a defeat to playing the old rivalry against India isn’t going to be easy. India probably watched the Australia game very closely and know what needs to be done. Pakistan need to lift themselves up and I hope they bring their best on Sunday.Also Read | India vs New Zealand: Anil Kumble, Brian Lara question rain preparedness for World Cup 2019Also Read | Will try our level best vs India, says Pakistan captain Sarfaraz after Australia defeatAlso See:advertisementlast_img read more

Astomos Kuwait Petroleum to Study LPG Bunkering

first_imgzoom Japan’s Astomos Energy Corporation and oil company Kuwait Petroleum Corporation (KPC) have agreed to further study the use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as ship bunker fuel.The parties reached a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with the aim to enhance cooperation, share and research information in the fields of consideration of LPG fueled vessels, organizing global supply sites for LPG bunkering and other fields relating to LPG bunkering.For the past years, KPC and Astomos have been forming respectable business partnership in the fields of LPG supply and import. This MOU made the partnership stronger for the two companies and will contribute to expansion of new business fields, Astomos said.The latest MOU comes on the back of an agreement reached with Australian LPG distributor Elgas in late October, aimed at further studying the use of LPG as bunker fuel. Earlier in 2017, Astomos signed a separate MOU with Norway-based oil and gas company Statoil for the same purposes.LPG bunkering concept was shaped as one of the solutions for the approaching SOx Regulation for shipping fuels in 2020.last_img read more

Manitoba Appeal Court told mans conviction in drug dealers death cannot stand

first_imgWINNIPEG – A Manitoba man imprisoned for 23 years for first-degree murder before spending the last nine years on probation is on the verge of having his name cleared.Lawyers for the Crown and defence told the Manitoba Court of Appeal on Monday that they agree Frank Ostrowski’s 1987 conviction in the shooting death of a drug dealer was a miscarriage of justice and cannot stand.“His trial was unfair,” Crown attorney Randy Schwartz told the three judges hearing the case.“The parties agree that this case should be terminated permanently.”The Crown is asking for a judicial stay of proceedings, which would put an end to the case. The defence wants the court to go a step further and formally acquit Ostrowski, now in his late 60s.Ostrowski was found guilty of ordering the shooting of a fellow drug dealer and was convicted largely on the testimony of a key witness — Matthew Lovelace — who had separate charges of cocaine possession stayed in exchange.Ostrowski’s lawyers and the jury were never told about the deal and Lovelace told the trial he did not receive any favours in exchange for his testimony.Ostrowski’s lawyer told the Appeal Court that the Crown attorney in the original trial, George Dangerfield, crossed a line by not correcting Lovelace when he testified he did not receive a deal.“He was trying not to cross it. But the reality is he did … by not interrupting and saying, ‘Hang on a sec. Lovelace isn’t telling the truth,’” James Lockyer said.Ostrowski maintained his innocence throughout his incarceration and, in 2009, a Court of Queen’s bench judge cited serious concerns with the conviction and released Ostrowski on bail. In 2014, then-federal justice minister Peter MacKay ruled the case a likely miscarriage of justice and ordered the Manitoba Court of Appeal to review it.Schwartz said Monday that while it was wrong to not reveal Lovelace’s testimony deal, it is not clear whether the Crown at the time knew about the deal or whether police had withheld that information.Schwartz also said there was other evidence that might cause a jury to link Ostrowski to the killing — mainly other witness testimony about his fear that the victim was going to tell police about Ostrowski’s drug activities.For that reason, Schwartz said, Ostrowski does not meet the legal criteria for a full acquittal.The Appeal Court judges reserved their decision to an undetermined date. Ostrowski remains under bail conditions for now.His case is one of a few high-profile wrongful murder convictions that have come to light in Manitoba.James Driskell was convicted of killing a friend in Winnipeg in 1990. The verdict was based partly on testimony from a witness who was given tens of thousands of dollars in expense payments as well as immunity on an arson charge. The trial was not told about the deal. Driskell’s conviction was quashed in 2006.Kyle Unger was convicted, based partly on hair samples found at the scene, of killing a teenage girl at a rock festival in 1990. DNA tests years later showed the hair did not belong to him.Thomas Sophonow was found guilty of killing a waitress in 1981. That was based largely on the testimony of a witness who contradicted in court what she had told police. The defence was not told about the contradiction and Sophonow spent four years in prison before he was freed.Note to readers: This is a corrected story. An earlier version incorrectly referred to Crown attorney Randy Schwartz as Schultz in later paragraphslast_img read more

Anna Netrebko to make Canadian debut in Toronto

first_img Facebook Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Login/Register With:center_img Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment One of the most famous opera singers in the world is to make her Canadian debut at Toronto’s Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts.Russian soprano Anna Netrebko is to perform here in the world premiere of a new opera trio, Trio Magnifico.Composed of Netrebko, her husband, Azerbaijan-raised tenor Yusif Eyvazov, and Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky, Trio Magnifico is to appear April 25 in The Ultimate Opera Gala, a presentation of the Canadian Opera Company and Show One Productions.last_img read more