Follow the yellow dots to Foy & Company this weekend

first_imgFoy & Company Letterkenny and Ballybofey is hosting a Yellow Dot Sale Event this weekend with some great offers and in-store events taking place. Running from Thursday 28th to Sunday 31st March (online only on Sunday), the Yellow Dot Sale Event includes a series of in-store textile demonstrations, one-to-one colour consultations, a live cookery demonstration with Chef Brian McDermott, and lots of competitions and giveaways. There’ll also be a chance to meet the famous Dulux dog this Saturday in Letterkenny and Ballybofey! Interior designer and Dulux colour expert, Kathy Bracken is holding a number of one-to-one consultations in Foy’s Ballybofey and Letterkenny, with limited spaces still available. The interior design workshop with Adele Roche has already sold out, so if you’re interested in getting free expert advice, call Foy & Company today to book your slot with Kathy. Book a one-to-one consultation with interior designer and colour expert, Kathy Bracken from Dulux.Chef Brian McDermott will also be doing a live cookery demonstration in the Ballybofey store on Saturday 30th March from 1pm to 2.30pm, where he’ll be giving top tips ahead of Mother’s Day and sharing recipes from his new book, Donegal Table.Join Chef Brian McDermott (pictured with Ann Foy) at Foy & Company Ballybofey this Saturday (1 – 2.30pm) for a live cookery demonstrationThe Yellow Dot Sale Event will also see some great offers with 20% off items with a yellow sticker throughout the weekend. There’s also 20% off ready-made curtains and selected lines of fabrics as well as some extra special offers running across both stores with up to 70% off selected lines. Rachel McLaughlin chooses her top picks from Foy & CoEarlier this week, Rachel McLaughlin of Donegal Woman caught up with the Foy & Company team to select her top Yellow Dot picks.Her favourite was this multicoloured statement chair: “This colourful chair caught my eye as it would really add warmth and character to any living space. It’s an ideal size for cosy living spaces and the wooden legs give it a contemporary feel,” Rachel said.“Foy & Company also has a great selection of corner sofas to suit every type of space. I particularly loved this Hexham Corner Group in the Letterkenny store.”  The Hexham Corner Sofa is now only €1199.20 in the Foy & Company Yellow Dot Sale.Rachel adds: “The store is packed with bright and beautiful cushions and throws, which are great for adding splashes of colour to spaces in an instant. I love this pink cushion, which would work very well with grey, white or navy colour schemes.”Get 20% off selected lines of fabrics and accessories in The Foy & Company Yellow Dot Sale Event“I can imagine these cushions would add great colour to this luxurious chaise longue, which really stood out in the store. Comfy and elegant, this would be the dream seat for me to curl up with a good book.”This chaise longue was €499 and is now €299 in the Foy & Company Yellow Dot Sale this weekendFoy & Company Ballybofey has an excellent homeware department with all your kitchen essentials. From Stellar and Judge pots and pans to baking equipment, you’ll find everything you need to stock your kitchen. For this weekend only, there’s 20% off these handy kitchen tools pictured here. Kitchen Essentials from Foy & CoSet your home apart with Foy & Company’s range of designer and ready-made curtains. If you’re not sure which set to choose or how to match wall paint with curtains and other textiles, speak to the highly trained in-house interior designers at Foy & Company who are available for consultations for both residential and commercial projects. Visit www.foys.ie for more information. Follow the yellow dots to Foy & Company this weekend was last modified: March 28th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Live updates: Warriors vs. Kings, Friday at 7 p.m.

first_imgJoin us for live news and analysis Friday at 7 p.m. as the Warriors look to rebound from a real stinker when they face the Kings at Sacramento’s Golden 1 Center.The Warriors (19-10) had arguably one of their poorest efforts of the season Wednesday when they got smoked 113-93 by the Raptors in a showdown of the favorites to meet in the NBA Finals. Listless Golden State came into Oracle on a four-game winning streak and exited with some memories it would like to erase Friday.The Kings …last_img read more

Molecular Clock Keeps Wild Time

first_imgEvolutionists used to hope that the mutation rates in genes were relatively constant, so that they could provide a kind of “molecular clock” for inferring dates of divergence of ancestral species.  The first bad news was that not all molecular clocks tick at the same rate (rate heterogeneity).  Then they hoped that rate differences corresponded to body size, because there appeared to be such a trend among vertebrates.  The second bad news now comes out; according to an international team publishing in PNAS,1 rate variation does not scale with body size:The existence of a universal molecular clock has been called into question by observations that substitution rates vary widely between lineages.  However, increasing empirical evidence for the systematic effects of different life history traits on the rate of molecular evolution has raised hopes that rate variation may be predictable, potentially allowing the “correction” of the molecular clock.  One such example is the body size trend observed in vertebrates; smaller species tend to have faster rates of molecular evolution….    Phylogenetic comparative methods were used to investigate a relationship between average body size and substitution rate at both interspecies and interfamily comparison levels.  We demonstrate significant rate variation in all phyla and most genes examined, implying a strict molecular clock cannot be assumed for the Metazoa.  Furthermore, we find no evidence of any influence of body size on invertebrate substitution rates.  We conclude that the vertebrate body size effect is a special case, which cannot be simply extrapolated to the rest of the animal kingdom.   (Emphasis added in all quotes.)1Thomas et al., “Evolution: There is no universal molecular clock for invertebrates, but rate variation does not scale with body size,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, published online before print May 1, 2006; Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 10.1073/pnas.0510251103.Though disappointing to Darwinists, this will in no way affect their theories, because Darwinism does not rely on empirical evidence for support.  Evidence is just a nice thing to have when available.  Darwinism is more like entertainment; the show must go on.  Should non-Darwinists call this entertainment a comedy, or a tragedy?(Visited 6 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Innovative theatre for young minds

first_img15 June 2012 The African Research and Educational Puppetry Programme Trust, or arepp:Theatre for Life, is adding some spark to life skills education in South African schools, using humour and music in its interactive performances to demystify taboo subjects and enabling young people to make informed lifestyle choices. There is a great sense of orderliness ahead of arepp’s performance at the Rhodesfield Technical High School on Johannesburg’s West Rand. The familiar sound of the school bell signals the end of each lesson, prompting pupils to walk briskly along the corridors to their next class, and in the reception area there is serious talk of reports, averages, tests and results. But as soon as the play starts, the school hall – with a group of about 300 grade eight pupils neatly seated in rows on the floor – explodes with laughter, whistling and cheering. Even the teachers who are supervising the noisy group of teenagers can’t help but smile. The performance that follows will undoubtedly be the highlight of every pupil’s day. Targeted at grades eight to 12 pupils, the focus of the Look Before You Leap play series is on choices, problem solving and self-image. It explores how ideas of gender and sexuality affect perceptions of self and society. Arepp’s approach to educational theatre is all about making learning fun and, through the different characters, help pupils make an emotional connection with the content of the play. The award-winning educational theatre group takes learning out of the classroom onto the stage, and there is nothing high-brow about these performances. Instead of sidestepping the serious issues affecting young people in South Africa, arepp’s candid approach and innovative use of theatre highlights difficult social and personal issues such as sexuality, relationships, pregnancy, substance use, HIV/Aids, physical and emotional abuse and gender equality.Learning can be fun Brigid Schutz, director at arepp, says the structure and character development of the plays help pupils to identify closely with the situations portrayed. Unlike traditional theatre, the audience are not passive observers, as the play mirrors their personal experiences on stage. One of the actors, Ruan Zed, says that theatre is a powerful medium that helps people to see issues from a different perspective. “Theatre puts your own life story on stage,” he says. This particular play, Look Before You Leap: Oh Yeah! deals with issues that all high school pupils can relate to – peer pressure and temptation, not fitting in and being different. It also examines the uncertainty of early relationships, being true to one’s identity and self-esteem. “The characters in the play go through an emotional process and because it becomes a personal experience for the pupils, they can identify and connect with it,” Schutz explains.Making life orientation relevant The productions, which run for an hour – the first half is the play, which is then followed by a 30-minute problem-solving discussion with the audience – are specifically designed to be performed as a life orientation (LO) lesson within the school’s daily schedule. LO is a compulsory subject in South African schools for all grades. This new area of learning replaced subjects such as career guidance, physical training and religious education. The point of LO is to enable pupils to make wise choices, understand healthy living, get career direction, learn study skills and become aware of environmental, community and society issues. Although it covers non-academic skills needed in life, Rhodesfield’s LO teacher Elliot Faku says there is a perception in schools that LO is not as important as the more academic subjects like maths or science. “The subject is highly relevant as it deals with what life is like after school,” he says. He is a great supporter of using theatre as a learning tool. “It further entrenches the concepts that the pupils learn in class,” Faku says. “Even though the kids see it as a break from their normal school routine, they are still learning.”Problem-solving through discussion After each performance pupils have an opportunity to ask questions, talk about the issues raised in the play, contextualise the content and debate the decisions made by the characters. The discussion time is important because it encourages open communication. “It shows the pupils that their opinions are valued,” Schutz says. Most of them are not scared to ask difficult questions that they might not usually want to discuss with other adults such as their parents or teachers. Throughout the discussion, the group is encouraged to offer answers themselves, which builds confidence and problem-solving skills. Zed notes that in all the discussion sessions they’ve noticed that the questions and opinions of the pupils are closely related to their own lives. By sharing their understanding of the issues, pupils become more confident to talk about them in the classroom, on the playground and at home. “Arepp doesn’t give right or wrong answers,” he says. “What we want to do is develop resilient youth who can deal with any challenge and know what they stand for,” Zed says.Reaching as many kids as possible Arepp’s life skills and self-efficacy development programmes reach all age groups in schools with four series of shows: Look Before you Leap, aimed at groups between 13 and 22; About Us for 10 to 13 year olds; No Monkey Business and the Monkey Tales series for the groups between six and nine and three and five respectively. “There is a need to do more of this type of theatre in South Africa,” Schutz says. “There are many theatre education initiatives that start up, but keeping it going is difficult because it is very costly.” The organisation relies entirely on external funding to continue its work. Currently it receives support from the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund, the STARS Foundation and a foreign donor agency in the Netherlands. Established in 1987, arepp reaches about 120 000 pupils between the ages of five and 18 in 350 schools each year. Feedback from teachers last year showed an increase of 81% in the audience’s knowledge, skills, ability and confidence to deal with issues directly affecting them. The reported percentage of physical and sexual abuse cases in those schools halved from the previous year, to just under 4%, and reported pregnancies declined from 9% to less than 1%. Reported suicides decreased and overall, 80% of audiences indicated changes in their feelings of worth, competency and control with regard to the issues presented in the plays. “This shows that our performances are helping to make a difference,” says Schutz. Last year the company was selected from 976 applicants from 60 countries to receive the 2011 STARS Foundation Impact award in education. The foundation offers awards to charities in the Africa-Middle East and Asia-Pacific regions working with children in the areas of health, education and protection. The award is allowing arepp to fund additional theatre projects and perform about 200 more presentations, which will benefit 30 000 additional pupils. Schutz describes the award as an important accolade as it validates the organisation’s work and recognises arepp’s contribution of 25 years to the promotion of human rights in South Africa. “It highlights the vital importance of assisting young people and children to understand, engage with, and contextualise the notions and practical applications of their rights,” she says. Edited version of photograph by Andrew Aitchison, reproduced with kind permission. Article first published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Serenbe: a Green Town in the Making

first_imgBiophillic featuresNygren appreciates nature and wants to facilitate greater appreciation of our outdoor environments. He is creating at Serenbe an institute focused on biophilia to promote and teach about biophilic features of land use. (Biophilia, a termed coined by Harvard biologist E. O. Wilson, is the innate affinity — or love — that humans have for nature.) Much of the landscaping in the development reflects this priority. I spent a while Friday afternoon photographing swallowtail butterflies on some gorgeous plantings of butterfly bush by the Inn at Serenbe and the Farmhouse Restaurant.Many of the traffic-calming bump-outs (extensions of curbs into the streets to slow traffic and demark on-street parking) are planted with edible landscaping. Nygren told me that the blueberry bushes and fig trees are favorites for the students who attend the Montessori school next to the Bosch Experience Center. Fruit trees that have been planted there will become popular as they reach fruit-bearing age. Naturalized wetlands for sewage treatmentBefore my presentation Saturday morning I explored some of the wild areas at Serenbe — or at least I thought they were wild. When I later talked with Nygren, he explained that part of the area I had walk through is actually an extensive constructed wetland for wastewater treatment. RELATED ARTICLES Green Neighborhood in North CarolinaAn 11-Home Community Built for Energy EfficiencyA New Net-Zero CommunityA Cohousing Community Readies for ConstructionA Net-Zero Energy Apartment Complex Opens in San DiegoA Net-Zero-Energy Community Near BoulderNew, Affordable, and Green in a Historic Neighborhood Alex is founder of BuildingGreen, Inc. and executive editor of Environmental Building News. In 2012 he founded the Resilient Design Institute. To keep up with Alex’s latest articles and musings, you can sign up for his Twitter feed. Michael Ogden, of Biohabitats, headquartered in Baltimore, Maryland, whose work I have long admired, designed this system, which will be able to treat the wastewater from all 220 homes and townhouses once build-out is complete, along with two schools and significant areas of commercial development. Rather than being cordoned off with chain link fences, as one might expect with wastewater treatment, this sewage treatment area hosts a network of trails and a boardwalk for all to enjoy. New Urbanist development patternsConventional development today is sprawling, with each home served by a driveway and usually a garage facing the street; most houses are on cul de sacs, which discourage walking. At Serenbe, the houses are located right along the streets, with on-street parking in front and, often, alley access behind. Townhouses provide greater density and more urban feel in the town centers of the community.Saturday afternoon, as I was leaving for the airport, a “tailgate party” of Georgia Tech football fans with a live band on one of the homes’ porches, had spilled out into the street as an impromptu block party — something the community is designed to encourage.Many of these buildings feature live-work arrangements with commercial or retail space on the street level and apartments above. I stayed in a very pleasant in-town apartment that is managed by the Inn at Serenbe. After working on my presentation in my room Friday night, I walked downstairs and down a few doors on the sidewalk to discover a musician performing at the Blue Eyed Daisy Bakery Café.I bought a beer and joined the 20 or so others enjoying the music. It isn’t quite East Village, but I can see how this will become a more and more vibrant area as the build-out continues.Serenbe is different from Seaside, probably America’s most famous New Urbanist town (on Florida’s panhandle). Serenbe is more spread out, with a lot more open space that separates the higher-density neighborhoods and three town centers (the construction of one of which has yet to begin). To get from one neighborhood to another some people drive (either by car — 15 mph speed limit, controlled by rather robust speed bumps — or electric golf carts, which are very popular). An extensive network of trails also connect these areas.As more of the development is completed at Serenbe, I think it will gain more of a “critical mass” feel. Nygren pointed out places where clusters of additional homes will be built, along with several hundred thousand square feet of commercial space, including retail shops, offices, a hotel, and (notably) a brew-pub. Farming at SerenbeIt was partly out of an interest is supporting local agriculture and farm-to-plate initiatives that Serenbe was first created. Currently eight acres of land are being actively farmed in a certified organic and Biodynamic operation, and 25 acres are set aside for farming. The farm is managed by Paige Witherington with several interns, and it supplies food to a 125-person CSA (community-supported agriculture operation), the Saturday farmers’ market in one of the town centers, two acclaimed restaurants at Serenbe, and the Blue-Eyed Daisy Bakery.There are also horse pastures and stables, with trails extending through the undeveloped portions of the property.Next week I’ll cover some of the energy features at Serenbe. I’m just back from Atlanta, where I spoke on Saturday at the new Bosch Experience Center located in the unique Serenbe Community thirty miles southwest of Atlanta.I gotta say, I was impressed!Serenbe is the creation of Steve Nygren, who was kind enough to show me around and point out some of the community’s green features after my presentation. It is a 1,000-acre new town development that is one of the best examples in the country today of what a green development can be.For starters, the larger area — about 62 square miles — was incorporated by Nygren and some other developers as its own municipality, the City of Chattahoochee Hills, allowing them to establish some highly unusual zoning regulations. For example, at least 70 percent of the land in any development must remain as open space, which can include agriculture, recreation, or natural area.last_img read more

Commonwealth Games Glasgow 2014: Games begin today, Sachin to play special role

first_imgVijender Kumar and Mandeep Jangra during a training session in Glasgow.The unprecedented success achieved in the last edition would be hard to replicate this time but a 215-member Indian contingent would nonetheless seek a top-five finish at the 20th Commonwealth Games which begin in Glasgow on Wednesday.India finished second behind Australia with a record 101 medal haul in New Delhi.The Games will have superstar sprinter Usain Bolt of Jamaica and middle and long distance king Mo Farah of England as highlights of the sporting extravaganza.India will be hit hard by the scrapping of archery and tennis and the reduction in the number of medal events in shooting and wrestling.India’s medal tally is expected to reduce drastically from the 101 (38 gold, 27 silver, 36 bronze) in 2010 and anything above 60 can be considered an achievement.India and Canada, who have sent a 265-member team to Glasgow, are expected to fight for third place behind Australia and England.India has returned with nearly 30 medallists from the last Games with the likes of Abhinav Bindra, Gagan Narang, Vijender Singh, Sushil Kumar, Yogeshwar Dutt, Krishna Poonia, Ashish Kumar and Achanta Sharath Kamal set to prove their mettle once again.Shooting is still expected to contribute a major chunk of medals for India despite 18 events being dropped since the last edition. Wrestling could get win at least 10 medals.The men’s and women’s hockey teams are also expected to finish on the podium.India is also set to lose out in athletics, which yielded 12 medals, including two gold, in Delhi. With lack of preparation ahead of the Games and most athletes struggling for form, not much is expected. The country may expect four or five medals with Krishna Poonia and Vikas Gowda (discus throw) and Arpinder Singh (triple jump) among contenders. The women’s 4x400m relay quartet has an outside chance for a medal.advertisementIn badminton, despite the absence of Saina Nehwal, India is expected to do well with PV Sindhu top seeded shuttler in women’s singles.The Games will officially be opened by Queen Elizabeth II at Celtic Park. Sachin at openingSachin Tendulkar is all set to play a special part in Wednesday’s opening ceremony of the 20th Commonwealth Games.Tendulkar will make his presence felt during the ceremony as the Global Goodwill Ambassador of the UNICEF, which has partnered with the GlasgowCWG organisers and the Commonwealth Games Federation in a first-of-its-kind initiative to spread awareness about the childrens’ problems.Organisers are however tightlipped about the details of Tendulkar’s role during the ceremony.”There will be something special from Tendulkar, wait and watch tomorrow, Lord David Puttnam,” UNICEF UK Ambassador, said after a programme on the partnership. Indian coaches now allowed at ringsideIndian boxers at the Glasgow Commonwealth Games will now be assisted by their coaches at ringside during their bouts.Kishen Narsi, India’s representative at the International Boxing Association (AIBA), informed that the world body has reversed its earlier decision byallowing Indian coaches to assist pugilists.”The Indian boxers are relieved and excited that Indian coaches will be allowed to second our boxers and be at ringside as per the information communicated by AIBA secretary,” read the mail.AIBA had earlier banned India coaches from ringside without giving any specific reason, but it was learnt that it resulted from confusion after the Indian federation’s exclusion from AIBA’s member list.But the world body seems to have realised that though the Indian federation is not a full member, it has provisional membership and has the right to take coaches to a tournament.The AIBA had already allowed Indian boxers to wear the national jersey, use the Tri-colour and play the national anthem in case one of them wins a gold medal during the CWG. Till then, the boxers were fighting under the AIBA banner ever since the Indian federation was suspended in December 2012. But AIBA had stated that coaches can’t be at ringside, a decision they reversed on Tuesday.The relaxation is only for the CWG as the AIBA has recently directed Boxing India, the provisional group to run the sport, to conduct an election byAugust 15 otherwise the boxers and coaches will face a ban from all AIBA-sanctioned tournaments.Eight men and three women Indian boxers are participating in Glasgow. The boxing competition starts on Friday but the pugilists have reached well inadvance to acclimatise. The men’s team has two practice sessions a day. Women boxers are excited since the discipline is making its debut at the CWG. However, their participation is limited to only – 51kg, 60kg and 75kg. At 2010 CWG, Indian boxers won three gold and four bronze medals.advertisementlast_img read more