The Horse Park to host high school rodeo this weekend

first_imgThe event is free to come and watch as individuals from the Northern B.C. High School Rodeo Association take part. Upwards of 90-100 competitors are expected for the event that will see students from areas such as Fort St. John, Dawson Creek, Chetwynd, Quesnel, Prince George, and others taking part.The new Horse Park is located on the Swanson Lumber Road. The rodeo will begin at 10 a.m. Saturday, and 9 a.m. on Sunday.There’s still sponsorship spots available if anyone is interested in helping out with the costs associated in hosting the event. You’re encouraged to contact Audra Hiebert at 250-264-7740.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Live updates: Warriors vs. Kings, Friday at 7 p.m.

first_imgJoin us for live news and analysis Friday at 7 p.m. as the Warriors look to rebound from a real stinker when they face the Kings at Sacramento’s Golden 1 Center.The Warriors (19-10) had arguably one of their poorest efforts of the season Wednesday when they got smoked 113-93 by the Raptors in a showdown of the favorites to meet in the NBA Finals. Listless Golden State came into Oracle on a four-game winning streak and exited with some memories it would like to erase Friday.The Kings …last_img read more

Cape Town’s new bus system

first_img2010 host city Cape Town is getting anadvanced integrated rapid transportsystem, just in time for the World Cup. The Green Point stadium construction site.The stadium precinct will link to the citycentre, airport and residential areas in thecity bowl.(Images: City of Cape Town)Janine ErasmusIn May 2008 the City of Cape Town unveiled plans for a world-class integrated rapid transport system. Now the first phase has received the green light and will be operational by March 2010, say city authorities. The entire four-phase project will be implemented over the next 10 to 12 years.An integrated rapid transport (IRT) system brings various modes of public transport together into a united effort, and takes priority over private transport.“In the context of our goal of infrastructure-led economic growth and job creation, this is possibly our single most important project,” said Cape Town mayor Helen Zille, recently voted the world’s top mayor for 2008 by the London-based World Mayor Project.“The 2010 Football World Cup is our chance to show the world what we are capable of as a city and as a nation,” commented Zille. “It is one of our best opportunities to market Cape Town as an investment and tourist destination. It is also an important opportunity to fast forward a few years in infrastructure investment, and create a lasting legacy for our citizens.”Cape Town’s IRT system will bring the city up to the required standard for the national Department of Transport’s 2010 host city transport operations plan, as well as the host city agreement signed with Fifa. These plans will make maximum use of existing transport resources, ensuring that security and emergency response strategies are in place, and catering to those with special needs.However, Cape Town citizens will benefit from the new system for many years to come. The initial Phase 1A is designed to demonstrate the system’s capabilities and garner maximum public support ahead of the expansion into the full Phase 1 plan. Each phase has been designed to be financially self-sustaining independent of any future development.Better bus serviceCape Town’s system largely involves an efficient and reliable bus service that will run in two parts – main or trunk routes and feeder routes. The trunk routes will feature dedicated bus lanes, in most cases in the middle of the road, for special 18m articulated vehicles. These vehicles will feature wide doors to allow many people to embark and disembark simultaneously into weatherproof stations, while fares will be collected beforehand using smart cards at station entrances.The emphasis is on easy access between the system and other transport options such as bicycles, taxis and walking, as well as convenience for children, the elderly and the disabled. In addition, vehicles will feature clean, low-noise technology and the whole system is designed as an environmental showcase for Cape Town.The feeder services will connect communities with trunk routes using use smaller 8m and 12m vehicles running on normal streets. Passengers will pay with smart cards as they board. These services are expected to run for longer hours than the city’s current public transport systems.Linking the city and communitiesThe R1.3-billion ($130-million) phase 1A will link Cape Town International Airport and the inner city with the Green Point stadium precinct, a requirement of Cape Town’s status as 2010 host city. Key destinations in the city include Central Station, the V&A Waterfront, Long Street, Sea Point, as well as Hout Bay. Nearby residential areas such as Tamboerskloof, Oranjezicht, Vredehoek and Gardens will be serviced by the feeder system.The inner city service will provide an affordable and convenient way of getting around, not just for the millions of tourists who are expected to pour into South Africa’s host cities during the weeks of the Fifa World Cup, but also for the many thousands of people who live and work in Cape Town’s city bowl.The airport link will provide rapid, high frequency services between the airport and the city centre, Green Point and Sea Point via the N2 freeway’s dedicated bus and minibus taxi lane, which went live on 1 August 2007. The bus lane is already proving to be a great success, getting city commuters to their destinations with a 20 minute saving over previous journey times.Phase 1A will also reach out to high-density residential areas and low-income communities up the west coast, including Bloubergstrand, Table View, Mamre, Atlantis, Doornbach and Du Noon. Many of these communities currently have no sustainable public transport option to boost employment and the new service is expected to breathe new life into the region as well as alleviate high levels of traffic congestion closer to Cape Town.The next three phases will cover the northern and southern suburbs and the Cape Flats communities of Mitchell’s Plain, Khayelitsha, Delft and Blue Downs, as well as the university town of Stellenbosch, located about 50km from the Cape Town city centre.Public participationIn order to ensure that public needs and concerns are met, the City is holding a series of information meetings during October and November 2008. The meetings will involve communities, people and businesses affected by the first phase.City authorities are also working to provide all existing bus and minibus owners the opportunity to participate in the Cape Town IRT system.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at janinee@mediaclubsouthafrica.com. This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Useful linksCape Town IRT websiteDepartment of Transport 2010 transport projectslast_img read more

Elections 2014: guide to voting, counting and objecting

first_imgDownload the app The IEC has designed an app especially for voters which allows you to check your registration details, find your voting station – and keep up to date via social media. 5 May 2014 South Africa goes to the polls on Wednesday – and many in the country who are too young to remember apartheid will be voting for the first time. According to the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), more young South Africans have registered to vote in this election than ever before – with 49.57% of registered voters under 40 years old. The biggest segment of voters is those aged 30 to 39 (6.18-million), followed by 20- to 29-year-olds (5.7-million), the IEC says. As this new generation of voters prepare to join millions of their fellow South Africans at the polls on Wednesday, we answer a few last-minute questions.Are you ready? If you are a South African citizen 18 years or older and have registered to vote, remember:Voting stations are open from 7am to 9pm on Wednesday.You must vote where you registered. SMS your ID number to 32810 to confirm your correct voting station. SMSs cost R1. Or you can check your registration details on the IEC’s website.Take along your green bar-coded South African ID book, or a smart ID card, or your temporary identity certificate. Read more: All the election info, results via mobile appFind out where to download the IEC’s voters app Read more: New ballot paper for visually impaired voters The ballot papers An IEC official will give you two ballot papers that will be stamped on the back. One paper is for you to choose your preferred party for the National Assembly. The other paper is for you to choose your preferred party for the provincial legislature for the province in which you live. You do not have to fill in the same party on both ballot papers – you can choose different parties if you want. What information is on the ballot papers?The full name of each political partyThe abbreviated name or shortened name of each partyThe logo or symbol of each partyA photograph of each party leaderA blank space for you to indicate the party of your choice The voting process 1. Entrance: When you get to the entrance of the voting station, the door controller will tell you when it is your turn to enter. 2. ID Document: You will be directed to the voters’ roll table where IEC staff will look at your ID book or temporary ID certificate and check for your name on the voters’ roll. If you are not on the voters’ roll, but have proof that you have registered, such as a registration sticker, the presiding officer must validate your proof of registration. If the officer is satisfied with the proof, you will have to complete a VEC4 form (national elections) or MEC7 form (municipal elections) and will then be allowed to continue as an ordinary voter. 3. Inked thumb: IEC staff will ink your left thumb. This is special ink that will not wash off for several days. It will show everyone you participated (and prevent people from voting more than once). Your ID book will also be stamped to show you have voted. 4. Ballot paper: The voting officer will stamp the back of two official ballot papers (one for the national election; the other for the provincial election) and give them to you. 5. Voting booth: You will be directed to an empty voting booth. You will be alone in a voting booth. Your vote is your secret. Here, you will place your X in the box next to the political party of your choice on both ballot papers. Your vote does not have to be the same. Fold your papers and leave the voting booth. If you incorrectly mark a ballot paper and realise this before placing it in the ballot box, just ask the presiding officer for a new ballot paper. Make sure that the incorrect ballot paper is marked as “cancelled”. 6. Ballot box: Place your folded ballot papers into the right ballot box: one for national; the other for provincial votes. Once your ballot has been placed in the ballot box, it can’t be removed. 7. Exit: Make your way to the exit. Security staff will be there to help you.Physically disabled voters If you are physically disabled or visually impaired, you can choose someone to help you at the voting station. The Presiding Officer can also help you cast your vote, but an observer and, if available, two agents from different parties must be present. How do you make your mark? Make your mark in the box next to the party of your choice. Make only one mark per ballot paper. Your mark must not touch any of the walls/lines of the box. It is best to make a cross. If you make a mistake, do not put your paper in the box. Call an IEC official, who will cancel your paper and give you a new one. Once you have made your mark, fold each ballot paper in half. An IEC official will then check the stamp on the back of every ballot. You can then place your paper into the relevant boxes.The counting process The overall election results will be worked out using a computer system at centralised venues under the control of the IEC. Counting mostly happens at each voting station. Votes can be counted at a place other than at the voting station only with the approval of the IEC. Since the 2009 elections, there are improved controls over the record paper with the final results for a voting station. This has to be signed by the presiding officer and all political parties, and then scanned to create an immediate record and so more trust and openness in the process of compiling results.Explanation of the counting process 1. Verify: Accredited observers and party agents watch over the entire process, starting with the opening and emptying of the sealed ballot boxes. 2. Unfold: Each ballot is unfolded and the back is checked for a stamp. Ballots without stamps are not counted. 3. Sorted: The ballots are sorted into piles according to votes for each party. The counting officer must decide whether or not a questionable ballot paper (where it is not definitively clear which party has been voted for) should be counted or rejected. Party agents can dispute this. 4. Count and bundle: The ballots are counted and bundled into packs of 100. The results are then tallied for each party. 5. Reconcile and recount (if necessary): The results for the various parties are now reconciled against the total number of ballots. If the numbers do not match, there is a recount of all the votes. 6. Sign results slips and seal ballots: Results are recorded on to a results system that has automated quality controls to ensure accuracy of results. Results slips are signed by the counting officer and the party agents and are scanned to allow political parties to compare against recorded results. 7. Results centres: The results are posted on the door of the voting station and are also electronically sent to the national and nine provincial results centres where they are verified and collated. Independent external auditors audit this process. 8. Final results: The final results and seat allocations for national and provincial legislatures are announced by the chief electoral officer – usually within seven days of the election.Objections You can object against anything that happens during the elections that can affect the election results. You must make an objection before 5pm on the second day after voting. The IEC will investigate your objection and can ask you to give evidence about the objection. The IEC will decide what to do about the objection. The IEC must make a decision within three days after receiving your objection. If you are not happy with the IEC’s decision, you can appeal to the Electoral Court within three days of the IEC’s decision. After all objections are dealt with, the IEC must announce the final results within seven days of Election Day. In practice, the IEC has managed to announce election results on the third day after Voting Day. SAinfo reporter and Independent Electoral Commissionlast_img read more

Mowrystown FFA gets into the giving spirit this holiday season

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Mowrystown FFA hosted a school wide day of giving at Whiteoak Jr./Sr. High School on December 18th. Students had two different sessions to go to where they could either make tie blankets, assemble boxes of food, help decorate and fill bags for Totes for Hope, or watch a movie.By the end of the day the students had assembled about 30 blankets, 95 boxes of food, and about 25 bags for Totes for Hope. It was a fun and successful day of helping others and the Mowrystown FFA would like to thank everyone who helped and those who donated the material.last_img read more

Commonwealth broadband Africa Forum Dates Confirmed

first_imgAdvertisement The dates for this year’s Commonwealth broadband Africa Forum have been confirmed. It is set to take place from the 18th to 20th Nov 2014 at the Safari Park Hotel.The theme for this year’s event will be Broadband for Accelerated Growth, the event will examine aspects of Broadband, not only developing national Broadband strategies but with an overview of the Commonwealth Broadband strategy and the role of Universal Access Funds.Delving into how countries can transcend broadband implementation to accelerate economic growth. – Advertisement – Commonwealth Broadband Africa 2014 will give attention to the future of technology in Africa and examining how Africa’s expanding marketplace will be accelerated further by the technology innovations that drive growth; from the evolution of mobile technologies from 4G and beyond; watching the trends of cloud computing in emerging markets; new satellite and fibre optic cabling technologies; examining the use and influence of broadband applications and VAs and the rise of the Tech cities. Bringing together Regulators, Governments, Operators, Vendors and Universal Service Fund Administrators, revenue managers it will be a platform for gaining knowledge, exchanging views and seeking partnerships.Key topics:Determining Africa’s broadband futureMobile broadband technologies: 4G and LTEBroadband access and infrastructure aiding developmentDesigning the digital dividend: Future spectrum allocationCloud computing for Emerging marketsBroadband applications Innovation and VAsInclusion. Innovation. Beyond Broadband: The rise of the tech cities.Financing broadband in AfricaStrengthening broadband Public Private Partnerships to accelerate investment projectsCan I kindly request that we start to promote the event again on your site, we will update all banners and email for your reference.last_img read more