Syracuse football safety Chauncey Scissum becomes seventh player to leave program this offseason

first_img Published on December 16, 2016 at 7:52 pm Contact Jon: jrmettus@syr.edu | @jmettus Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse safety Chauncey Scissum has been granted his release and will transfer from Syracuse for his fifth year of eligibility, he announced on Instagram Friday night. He’s the seventh player to leave following Dino Babers’ first season as head coach.“This decision was not an easy one,” he said in the post. “I had to make a tough decision for betterment of self. I am extremely thankful for my family and their continued motivation and support.”Scissum, a redshirt junior, played in just six games this season for SU, recording one assisted tackle against Connecticut. It was a drop off from 2015 when he played in all 12 games, starting seven.Last April, Scissum and defensive back teammate Corey Winfield were stabbed on South Campus, allegedly by former Syracuse player Naesean Howard. Howard has been charged in connection with the case and his trial date has been set for Feb. 21, 2017.Winfield announced his intent to transfer on Nov. 29.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Commentslast_img read more

Report warns against delay in Social Security reforms

first_imgWASHINGTON – The Bush administration said in a new report Monday that Social Security is facing a $13.6 trillion shortfall and that delaying needed reforms is not fair to younger workers. A report issued by the Treasury Department said that some combination of benefit cuts and tax increases will need to be considered to permanently fix the funding shortfall. But White House officials stressed that President George W. Bush remains opposed to raising taxes. The Treasury report put the cost of the gap between what Social Security is expected to need to pay out in benefits and what it will raise in payroll taxes in coming years at $13.6 trillion. It said delaying necessary changes reduces the number of people available to share in the burden of those changes and is unfair to younger workers. “Not taking action is thus unfair to future generations. This is a significant cost of delay,” the report said. Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, Bush’s point person on Social Security reform, said he has had a number of discussions with members of Congress from both parties over the issue of fixing the problems in Social Security with the looming retirement of 78 million baby boomers. “While differences over personal accounts and taxes dominate the public debate over this issue, in my conversations I found that there are many other things on which people agree,” Paulson said in a statement accompanying the issues report. Bush had hoped to make Social Security reform the top domestic priority of his second term.. While Democrats have fought to protect current benefit levels, Republicans have been adamant that taxes should not be raised to cover the Social Security shortfall. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! In another key finding, the report said: “Social Security can be made permanently solvent only by reducing the present value of scheduled benefits and/or increasing the present value of scheduled tax increases.” The paper went on to say: “Other changes to the program might be desirable, but only these changes can restore solvency permanently.” While the language of the Treasury report seemed to indicate that the administration would consider raising taxes along with reducing benefits as a way to deal with the funding shortfall, the White House was quick to reject that possibility. “The president is not advocating for tax increases or benefit cuts,” said White House spokesman Tony Fratto. “Everyone understands that the choices available in the current structure of Social Security, that absent reform, tax increases and benefit cuts are inevitable,” Fratto said. “That’s why the president believes it makes more sense to reform the program sooner than later.” last_img read more