Governor Shumlin to refocus state’s relationship with UVM

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin gave the following address regarding the state of Vermont’s relationship with the University of Vermont. The public policy initiative, which would include the state college system, is to better focus the limited financial resources the state has into ‘maximum return on investment,’ as the governor put it, with particular focus on advancing science, engineering, technology and mathematics education.To this end, he announced a working group comprised of prominent Vermonters with ties to UVM and led by Nick Donofrio, a former top executive at IBM in Vermont. They are charged with identifying key issues between the state and the university and making recommendations that will be presented to the governor and the new UVM president next July. UVM Interim President John Bramley is also a member of the group.Shumlin made his remarks Tuesday afternoon at the Hoehl Gallery at the UVM College of Medicine.Remarks by Governor Peter ShumlinUniversity of VermontNovember 8, 2011Good afternoon and thank you for being here. I am here today on the University of Vermont campus to talk about the future of the university and its essential relationship with the state of Vermont. This is a topic that means a lot to me. I am convinced that Vermont can become known nationally as the Education State in the coming years, and that UVM will play a critical role in that evolution.To be clear, the state of higher education in Vermont is already strong. In addition to UVM, our state colleges and independent colleges consistently rank among the top in the nation. Young Vermonters and students from across the country are receiving a world-class education right now in the Green Mountain State. These schools have a $3 billion impact annually on Vermont’s economy.Since my focus today is on UVM, let me say a few words specifically about the University and its unique role in our state. UVM is a state treasure and a huge asset. It is the state’s only research university, contributing $1 billion a year to our economy. It retains and graduates Vermont students at record rates, and attracts thousands of young from across the nation and the world to study and live here. Its research and knowledge creation is key to Vermont’s future. Nearly 30,000 UVM graduates live and work here, contributing every day to our state’s quality of life.Just take a look at UVM’s vision and mission and you will hope, like I do, that the University succeeds in fulfilling them for the benefit of its students, our state, and our nation.UVM’s vision is, and I quote, ‘To be among the nation’s premier small research universities, preeminent in our comprehensive commitment to liberal education, environment, health, and public service.’The university’s mission is ‘To create, evaluate, share, and apply knowledge and to prepare students to be accountable leaders who will bring to their work dedication to the global community, a grasp of complexity, effective problem-solving and communication skills, and an enduring commitment to learning and ethical conduct.’Look around Vermont right now, and you will find the spirit of this mission hard at work. This University produces one of the best trained workforces in the country. Some of you may have heard of UVM graduates Briar and Adam Alpert. Their father, a UVM faculty member, founded BioTek Instruments, a cutting-edge manufacturer of medical equipment right here in Vermont. Briar and Adam have since taken over the company, and as creative entrepreneurs, they have made BioTek one of the best places to work in the state and business has thrived.Similarly, Steve Arms is the founder, President and CEO of MicroStrain, a company which develops and manufactures miniature sensors. Andrew Meyer has been busy since he graduated from UVM, founding the Center for an Agricultural Economy and helping to usher in a new era of innovative, value-added agriculture in Vermont. Other Vermont business leaders produced by this University include Jan Blittersdorf, President and CEO of NRG Systems, David Blittersdorf, President and CEO of AllEarth Renewables, Janette Bombardier, head of IBM’s Essex Plant, and the Pizzagalli brothers, leaders of PC Construction, one of the nation´s largest employee-owned contractors. UVM graduate Rich Tarrant is CEO and founder, with his two brothers, Jerry and Brian ‘ also graduates of the university — of Internet software firm MyWebGrocer. The list is endless.Because the futures of UVM and the state of Vermont are inextricably linked, I believe it is both appropriate and timely to take a hard look at the relationship between the state and the university. Vermont has always had limited resources to fund higher education in general and UVM in particular ‘ a reality made more stark by the continuing recession and the devastating impact of Tropical Storm Irene.The limited state resources we have available must be invested in Vermont’s only research university in strategically focused ways that have the maximum return on investment for Vermont and Vermonters. We have debated how UVM is funded and governed, but not taken action in nearly 60 years. The time to do so is now, with a strong sense of creativity, common sense, and focus on what is good for the future of both the state and the university.Before I lay out a proposal to examine the important relationship between the state and UVM, let me offer a brief historical context.The University of Vermont became public in 1955. At that time, there was no Vermont State College System and no Vermont Student Assistance Corporation. Since 1955, state funds for UVM have been spent in three basic ways: tuition offsets for Vermonters, support for the College of Medicine, and funding for Agricultural services. This year’s state appropriation was about $40 million, with an additional $1.8 million for capital expenditures. While these public dollars represent a small fraction of the combined revenues that support UVM’s $600 million plus operation, both UVM officials and I believe that it is very important that these funds be invested wisely and strategically to advance Vermonters job opportunities.I have made no secret of my concerns about some of the spending priorities UVM has made in recent years. Those concerns have been widely reported in the press, and I stand by those observations. I have said throughout some of these recent controversies, however, that my interest is not in criticizing the University for the sake of argument, but because I believe, working together, we can devise strategies for spending state dollars that produce better results for UVM, for our business community, and for the state.I believe these spending strategies should focus on a set of priorities that require making some hard long-term choices. These priorities include:â ¢ Preparing students for the jobs of the future by providing greater focus on the sciences, engineering, technology and mathematics.â ¢ Connecting the power of the research university and its educational programs to support and expand partnerships in the state’s business sector and economy.â ¢ Maintaining and innovating the essential infrastructure in agriculture that supports our economy and way of life, and fosters Vermont’s bright future as a quality food producer.â ¢ Supporting the transition to a health care system that contains costs, takes the burden off employers and strengthens health care delivery to keep Vermonters healthy.â ¢ Capitalizing on UVM’s leadership in environmental and complex systems ‘ systems that address one of my top priorities, the reality of our changing climate – by expanding its academic programs and offerings in climate change. I have long believed that the University can become a top national leader in this arena and am optimistic about the entrepreneurial opportunities in confronting climate change.â ¢ Preparing our students not only to get good jobs in Vermont when they graduate from UVM, but also for students to go out and create those good jobs as burgeoning entrepreneurs.â ¢ Collaborating with the Vermont State Colleges to ensure that our system of higher education is maximizing opportunities for students, limiting duplication, and increasing access, particularly for first generation college students.Since John Bramley became Interim President at UVM this summer, he and I have been engaged in a dialogue about these priorities and the relationship between the University and the state. While we may not agree on all issues regarding that relationship, I believe John and I share very similar views about the need to take a hard and realistic look at how we work together in the coming years and decades.Specifically, John and I agree that the current situation is not sustainable for the University or its students. We can do a better job of investing scarce state dollars in the disciplines and research that will be the economic engines of the next century. In my view, we are falling short of our goal of maximizing our return on state investment.A new strategy is needed, and today I am announcing a framework for developing that strategy.I have asked a group of eight highly skilled individuals with expertise in a wide range of disciplines, all of whom have deep ties with Vermont or the University of Vermont, to serve as an advisory group that develops ways to maximize the relationship between the University and the state.This group will be asked to examine a set of key issues related to that relationship, and provide recommendations to me and the incoming President of the University by July of next year. Their areas of focus will include, but not be limited to, the following areas:1. The differing roles of the University of Vermont and the Vermont State Colleges, and the implications and opportunities for program consolidation, reduction in duplication, and cost savings.2. Opportunities for public investment in high state priority programs and targeted scholarships at UVM with maximum return on investment, such as science, technology, engineering, and math.3. Directed scholarships in certain disciplines, incentives to stay in Vermont or return to Vermont.4. Other alternative, strategic approaches to focus and strengthen the relationship between UVM and Vermont for mutual benefit, including maximizing spires of excellence, innovation and job growth.The goal of this process is to engage in a strategic, data-driven dialogue that leads to specific, workable, and realistic outcomes.The group will meet regularly, both in person and virtually, and submit their recommendations to me and to the new UVM president taking office next summer. It will include the following individuals:â ¢ Nick Donofrio, chair. Nick is an innovator and entrepreneur and is the former Executive Vice President for Innovation and Technology at IBM and former General Manager of IBM’s plant in Essex.â ¢ Deb Granquist. Deb is a former banker and retired attorney who runs a consulting company to support non-profits. She is active in philanthropy and civic affairs and chairs several local and state boards.â ¢ Bill Wachtel. Bill is a UVM grad, attorney and founding partner of Wachtel & Masyr in New York. He is also the founder of several progressive organizations such as ‘Why Tuesday?, a non-partisan organization to increase voter turnout.â ¢ Peggy Williams. Peggy is President Amerita of Ithaca College and also served as President of Lyndon State College. Another UVM graduate, she holds several leadership positions in national organizations and promotes volunteerism, sustainability, diversity, and civil rights.â ¢ Emerson Lynn. Emerson is the editor-co-publisher of The St. Albans Messenger and co-publisher of The Milton Independent, The Essex Reporter and The Colchester Sun.â ¢ Bill Gilbert. Bill has served as a Trustee of the University of Vermont and has also served Vermont in a variety of notable public positions including Secretary of Administration for the late Gov. Richard Snelling.â ¢ Alma Arteaga. Alma is a junior at UVM majoring in Economics and Environmental Policy and Development and is active on issues impacting UVM and its students.â ¢ John Bramley will also serve as an ex-oficio member of the group.I am confident that these eight outstanding leaders in their fields will produce a thoughtful, provocative, compelling set of recommendations that the state and the University can implement in a timely manner.Let me close by reiterating my strong belief that the partnership between the University of Vermont and the state of Vermont is one that will continue to strengthen in the years ahead. UVM is an essential part of the Vermont culture, economy, and identity and will remain a top priority of the state of Vermont for my administration and many administrations to come.It is with tremendous optimism that I propose this re-examination of the relationship between the state and the University. We have a great opportunity to strengthen an already vibrant relationship. Working together, we will seize it.- 30 –last_img read more

Fan reactions to Syracuse’s 57-52 round of 64 win over TCU

first_img[View the story “Fan reactions to Syracuse’s 57-52 round of 64 win over TCU” on Storify] Comments Published on March 17, 2018 at 12:03 amcenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img

6th Annual United Way Charity Golf Tournament Tees Off June 9th

first_imgTAYLOR, B.C. – For the 2nd weekend in a row, golfers will be taking to the greens at Lone Wolf to raise money for a great cause.The 6th Annual United Way of Northern BC’s Charity Golf Tournament will be taking over Lone Wolf Golf Club in Taylor next weekend. The tournament goes down next Saturday at 12:30 P.M. with a shotgun start. The proceeds from the tournament will go towards the United Way of Northern BC, which provides help to youth, families and seniors across all of Northern BC.Entry is $150 per entrant, or $600 per foursome, and includes green fees, golf cart, and dinner, as well as a shot at prizes. To register for the tournament, go to www.unitedwaynbc.ca.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Flyers Destroy High Prairie Regals

first_imgThe Fort St. John Senior Flyers travelled to High Prairie to take on the Regals Saturday night.Fort St. John came away with the win 13-2.  David Alexander had 4 goals and Ian Munro, Jeff Shipton and Kip Noble had 2.  Chris Ford, Paul Weins and Todd Alexander had one goal a piece.The Regals faced 73 shots on net while the Flyers faced only 28.- Advertisement –last_img

Sarri eyes early Chelsea boost, Tottenham return to Wembley

first_imgBut while Chelsea are used to the upheaval of coaches coming and going under Roman Abramovich, Arsenal are still settling into Emery’s new era after 22 years with Arsene Wenger in charge.The early signs suggest it will take Emery time to stem years of decline towards the end of Wenger’s reign.However, the Spaniard had the misfortune to face champions Manchester City on his Premier League debut as Arsenal were outclassed in a 2-0 defeat on home soil last weekend.Sarri has also insisted it will take at least two months to implement the free-flowing attacking style that made him a coach in demand at Napoli.But, despite a disrupted pre-season due to his late arrival at Stamford Bridge to replace Antonio Conte, the departure of Thibaut Courtois and speculation over a host of other key players, Chelsea were too good for Huddersfield in an opening day 3-0 win.There were already clear hallmarks of Sarri’s influence as Jorginho, who followed his boss from Napoli to Chelsea in the summer, controlled the midfield.Chelsea are likely to be even stronger this weekend as Eden Hazard could return to the starting line-up after he shone in a 15-minute cameo at Huddersfield following his World Cup exertions with Belgium.Conte won just one of eight meetings with Arsenal in two seasons in charge. A quick reversal of fortunes this weekend would suggest Sarri is headed in the right direction.Spurs’ home from homeNo more Wembley woe: Tottenham had an impressive record at adopted home Wembley last season © IKIMAGES/AFP / Ian KINGTONAfter failing to sign a single player in the transfer window, Tottenham’s poor month off the field continued with the news this week that the club’s new stadium won’t be ready until at least October.That means Mauricio Pochettino’s men will play their first three home games of the season at Wembley, starting with the visit of Fulham on Saturday.Pochettino has vowed to deliver wins for fans frustrated by the delay.And more fixtures at the home of English football might not be a handicap on Spurs’ ambitions. After failing to win any of their first three home games last season, Tottenham won 13 of the next 16 Premier League games at Wembley once they adjusted to their new surroundings.Time for City’s squad to shineSilva lining: Bernardo Silva’s early season form may compensate for the loss of Kevin de Bruyne through injury © IKIMAGES/AFP / Ian KINGTONCity’s victory at Arsenal without ever hitting top gear last weekend was ominous for the challengers trying to stop Pep Guardiola’s men becoming the first side in a decade to retain the title.But City were dealt a huge blow when Kevin De Bruyne suffered a serious knee injury in training on Wednesday, expected to keep the Belgian sidelined for at least two months.If any squad is equipped to deal without a world class talent like De Bruyne, it is probably the one at Guardiola’s disposal.Bernardo Silva starred against Arsenal and Chelsea in the Community Shield from a more central role with new signing Riyad Mahrez starting on the right.David Silva is yet to play a minute this season and 18-year-old Phil Foden has been tipped by Kyle Walker to take his chance in De Bruyne’s absence.“We don’t just rely on one player. It’s a team game and whoever steps in will do well,” said Walker. “Obviously, it’s a big loss but we’ve got more than enough cover.”Life without De Bruyne begins at home to Huddersfield on Sunday.Fixtures (5pm unless stated)SaturdayCardiff v Newcastle (2:30pm), West Ham v Bournemouth, Tottenham v Fulham, Leicester v Wolves, Everton v Southampton, Chelsea v Arsenal (7:30pm)SundayManchester City v Huddersfield, Burnley v Watford (both 3:30pm), Brighton v Manchester United (6pm)MondayCrystal Palace v Liverpool (10pm)0Shares0000(Visited 2 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Fresh starts: Chelsea’s Maurizio Sarri and Arsenal’s Unai Emery take charge for just their second Premier League game on Saturday © AFP / Paul FAITHLONDON, United Kingdom, Aug 17 – Chelsea and Arsenal’s new regimes under Maurizio Sarri and Unai Emery got off to contrasting Premier League starts, but Saturday’s clash between the two will provide a truer test of where the London rivals stand.Failure to qualify for this season’s Champions League provoked big changes at both clubs.last_img read more