Are trail sports better than road sports?

first_imgIllustration by Wade Mickley88% say yesTrails are about releasing the spirit, not simply training the body. I run “on” the road; I run “with” the trail. There is no activity more primal than running in the woods. It reminds me that we are animals. When I run on the road, my legs and lungs are the most engaged parts of my body. When I run on a trail, I watch for rocks, roots, snakes, deer, and changes in the lay of the land. I smell wet leaves and pine resin. Trail running engages my whole body; it makes it sharper and looser. When I run on the road, I’m being dutiful and dedicated. When I run on a trail, I am wild and free.—Chris Alexander, Davidson, N.C. Adventure in the rugged outdoors always trumps the challenges that lay ahead on polished urban landscapes. Nothing beats being enveloped by the living forest, then feeling the raw earth crunching and shifting below, and inhaling the fresh oxygen rushing in to relieve overworked, burning lungs. However, road sports get more attention because spectators can watch them easier—plopping down beside the road or in front of their TV.—Jonathan Poston, Asheville, N.C. Leaving the stresses of a job and society for a few minutes—whether it be on a mountain bike or on foot—gives me a connection to something greater than any human can build. Most trails that I visit on a regular basis run with the topography of the land and provide a greater physical challenge than simply running or biking on asphalt.—Clint Ivester, Dallas, Ga. While being better for your overall physical self, trail sports also provide a better, safer atmosphere. They are primitive and enriching. We should appreciate our forests and trails while they’re still there, because they are being assaulted by development and commerce on all fronts.—Nikki McDuffee, Stanardsville, Va.I have run several road marathons over the years, and I have found that my knees and other joints aren’t as receptive to the pounding they must take on the asphalt. What running I do now is on trails. The ground has a lot more give, and the scenery is much nicer.—Karl Kunkel, High Point, N.C.I prefer to run and mountain bike on trails away from fuel-burning vehicles. Inhaling those fumes can’t be good for my health. A road run or ride may do more harm than good to my lungs.—Torrey Coffey, Loganville, Ga.———-12% say noWhile I enjoy the solitude of running in the woods, I have more fun during the experience of larger road races. At some of my favorites, like the Army 10-Miler in Washington, D.C., and the Peachtree Road Race in Atlanta, tens of thousands of runners congregate in a single spirit. The energy is amazing at these bigger races, and I feel like I am attending a festival. It takes my mind off the physical challenges of the distance and lets me just enjoy being a runner.This is what running is all about—going out and having a great time with some like-minded people. It’s also fun to get the encouragement of huge cheering crowds and take in the sights, including many of our country’s greatest historical landmarks. The best way to see a city is on foot with thousands of running friends.—Rick Moore, Alexandria, Va.I rely on road sports for exercise—mostly out of convenience. I need to run after long days at work to clear my head and relieve stress, but living in a city doesn’t give me the luxury of being able to quickly access a secluded wooded trail. The urban jungle certainly has its disadvantages—inconsiderate drivers, smog, and a lack of scenery—but I’ll take it over the confines of a stuffy, overpriced gym.—Mary Graves, Atlanta, Ga. I’d rather head to the track than the trail. For me, running is all about speed and pushing myself to my absolute limits. I love to see how fast I can sprint, and I just can’t do that on trails with a lot of rocks and roots. The same goes for races. I just can’t post a PR on a rugged mountain course, so I stick to the pavement where I can satisfy my need for speed.—Adam Harvey, Charleston, S.C.last_img read more

Hill-Rom Purchases German-Based Company

first_imgHill-Rom has purchased TRUMPF Medical, based in Germany.Hill-Rom announced today the signing of a definitive agreement to purchase TRUMPF Medical.The Batesville-based company acquired the medical unit The medical unit of the privately held TRUMPF Group, for approximately $250 million in cash.The transaction is expected to close late in the Company’s fiscal fourth quarter and will be immediately accretive to adjusted earnings per share.TRUMPF Medical, based in Germany, provides a portfolio of well-established operating room (OR) infrastructure products such as surgical tables, surgical lighting, and supply units. Hill-Rom’s surgical portfolio already includes leading products for surgical safety and efficiency such as Bard-Parker scalpels, the Allen Advance Spine Table, patient positioning accessories, surgical supplies and surgical fluids management systems.The addition of TRUMPF Medical’s line of integrated OR solutions doubles Hill-Rom’s surgical portfolio with market leading operating room products and positions the company to capitalize on new customer partnerships. This acquisition also strengthens the Company’s geographic footprint in high-growth markets, including Asia/Pacific, the Middle East, Eastern Europe, and Latin America.“The acquisition of TRUMPF Medical reflects our focused and disciplined strategy to pursue acquisitions that capitalize on Hill-Rom’s brand equity in targeted areas, diversify our portfolio and meet our objectives for growth and value creation,” said John J. Greisch, President and CEO of Hill-Rom.“The TRUMPF Medical business expands our portfolio beyond patient handling and mobility with innovative solutions for the operating room and diversifies our revenue stream with a sizable international surgical platform that will allow us to capitalize on emerging market growth. As a result, we will be able to leverage our existing sales channels and customer relationships in order to better address their needs. We look forward to playing an even greater role in improving patient care achieving greater levels of efficiency and reducing healthcare costs.”last_img read more

Disaster for West Ham as star striker is ruled OUT for four months

first_img1 West Ham’s Andy Carroll is set for another spell on the sidelines Andy Carroll’s nightmare spell at West Ham has taken a turn for the worse after it was revealed he would miss the next four months with ankle ligament damage.The Hammers had already revealed their £15million club-record signing would miss the rest of their pre-season tour to New Zealand as a precautionary measure.However, Jack Sullivan – son of West Ham co-owner David Sullivan – revealed on Twitter the problem was a lot more serious.He wrote: “Very bad news regarding AC. Torn ligaments in his ankle… Operation tomorrow with top surgeon in USA… Will be playing in 4 months.”Carroll later confirmed the news on the social media website, writing: “Going under the knife tomorrow morning and absolutely devastated to be missing the start of the season!!”The Hammers signed the Liverpool striker last summer despite the fact he was still carrying a heel problem, which meant he did not appear until January. Carroll then only mustered 15 Premier Leauge games last season, scoring just two goals.Manager Sam Allardyce was forced to persevere last season without his star striker, though, he has acted quickly this summer to make sure history does not repeat itself by signing Mauro Zarate and Enner Valencia.last_img read more