Architects of their future

first_imgFor the first time in its history, Harvard Graduate School of Design (HGSD) has four Native American students enrolled.Design and architecture schools across the country have historically had few Native students, with no more than a handful at a particular school at any given time. And out of over 90,000 working architects in this country, only a small percentage are Native American, notes GSD student Elsa Hoover. (A 2015 American Institute of Architects diversity report listed American Indian or Alaska native at 1 percent, based on survey responses.)Elsa Hoover, Zoë Toledo, Heidi Brandow, and Jaz Bonnin are the four at Harvard, and together they have formed the Harvard Indigenous Design Collective to promote design by and for Indigenous communities, which is foundational to the history, theory, and practice of design fields on Native homelands.last_img read more

ACE Night speakers share educational, personal outcomes of graduate program

first_imgCourtesy of Alysa Guffey Current ACE teachers living in Corpus Christi, Texas, opened the annual ACE information night with a prayer. Corpus Christ is one of 35 communities the ACE teaching fellows program serves.This year, a second option for the application process is available for students who would like to know of their acceptance decision to ACE earlier, Comuniello said. Applicants can either apply early by Nov. 3 and hear back by Christmas or apply regular decision by Jan. 19 and hear back in mid-March.Comuniello said he is proud that all 35 communities the program serves ask specifically for ACE teachers to be assigned in the community.“We’ve never gone to a diocese and asked to place teachers there, it has always been a response to the needs of that community,” Comuniello said. “So we’ve always been invited by the bishop or the superintendent, and then thereafter the principals of those schools.”Comuniello said after the teachers and schools are confirmed, the program plays “matchmaker” to align teachers’ strengths and content areas with the needs of each school. ACE teachers are split into three levels, with one-third teaching each level of elementary, middle and high school.While some ACE teachers graduate from the program and go on to fulfill a lifelong vocation of teaching, Comuniello said former ACE teachers can pursue a myriad of career paths, from medical school to law school and public service.While the online format for ACE Night did not allow for crowd interaction and conversation, interested undergraduates could hear from ACE teachers across the country who are currently in their service programs or recent graduates.The information night began with an opening prayer led by the current ACE teachers living in community with each other in Corpus Christi, Texas.Calling in on Zoom from New York City, Dan Faas, a member of ACE cohort 17, shared his experiences with the program from the two years he taught at the Most Sacred Heart of Mary High School in Mobile, Ala.“The best advice I would give you is to allow yourself to just delight in the lives of your students,” Faas said. “You have the opportunity to engage and become a part of children’s lives for two years or more.”Now a principal of a school, Faas explained his three “immutable facts” on ACE that he believes to be true.“Number one, your students will change you, if you let them,” he said. “Number two, your community will change you, if you let them. And number three, the Lord will change you, if you let him or her.”John Cunningham, a member of ACE cohort 26, spoke to audience members from Saint Joseph High School in South Bend where he currently has a full-time teaching position. Prior to teaching in South Bend, Cunningham taught middle school social studies in Mission, Texas, where he found himself immersed in the community.Cunningham recalled not knowing exactly where he would be located upon receiving his random position.“But when I looked it up [and] I realized where I was going, I was thrilled because I knew I was going to be living in a place where I would not have else lived,” he said.Cunningham connected with the community in Texas in two ways: tacos and basketball.“When I first got to the valley, I didn’t know the culture,” Cunningham said. “During my years in Mission, Texas, I took pictures of every taco I ate and I posted it on Snapchat, so I ended up with 415 tacos. I ate every one of them, and they were absolutely delicious.”Through coaching the middle school basketball team, Cunningham said he was able to connect with his students outside the classroom.“I could let my guard down as a teacher a little bit, they could let their guard down as the students and we could connect over a common bond, which is basketball, and it allowed us to really get to know each other,” Cunningham said.In addition to an educational experience, ACE teachers participate in a total of 12 retreats over the two-year commitment. The largest retreat each year convenes in December in Austin, Texas, where all teachers are invited.“[We invite] all 180 teachers across the country to celebrate with one another and to rekindle friendships, but also to pray and celebrate Mass and really recenter and ground ourselves in the why and what we’re doing,” Comuniello said.Given the relatively easy and free application process, Faas said he sees no reason for an interested student not to apply to ACE.“The process of applying for ACE is itself a form of discernment,” Faas said. “You get to discern ACE, and ACE gets to discern you.”Tags: Alliance for Catholic Education, Catholic Schools, graduate program, masters of education Instead of walking across campus to the Stinson Remick Building, students dialed in from their devices Wednesday night to learn about the teaching fellows program within The Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) in the annual fall ACE night.The ACE fellows program allows recent college graduates to embark on two years of service by teaching in under-resourced Catholic schools while working toward a cost-free Masters of Education degree.Michael Comuniello, associate director for recruiting and a 2016 ACE graduate, said each year there are 90 to 95 teachers who accept the position in the program, totaling around 180 ACE teachers serving in any given year between the two cohorts. According to Comuniello, roughly 50% of each cohort graduated from the tri-campus community and the other 50% come from across the country.last_img read more

Five-Time Tony Nominee John McMartin Dies at 86

first_img John McMartin, Tony Award-nominated actor of stage and screen, has died at the age of 86 following a battle with cancer. A death notice for the performer appeared in the New York Times on July 7.A Tony nominee for Sweet Charity, Don Juan, Show Boat, High Society and Into the Woods, McMartin is best known for creating the role of Ben Stone Follies in 1971. His recent Broadway credits included All the Way and Grey Gardens.McMartin was born on November 18, 1929, in Warsaw, Indiana. He initially went to school for journalism but went on to pursue acting in New York. On his 30th birthday, McMartin celebrated the opening night of his off-Broadway debut in Little Mary Sunshine; his performance won him a Theatre World Award.In 1961, McMartin made his Broadway debut in The Conquering Hero. He also performed in Blood Sweat and Stanley Poole before originating the role of Oscar in Sweet Charity in 1966. Three years later, he reprised his performance for the film adaptation.Follies marked the start of McMartin’s Stephen Sondheim repertoire; in 1991, he played Frederik Egerman in A Little Night Music at the James A. Doolittle Theatre (now the Ricardo Montalban Theatre) in Los Angeles. He later played the Narrator and Mysterious Man in the 2002 revival of Into the Woods, earning a Tony nod for Best Actor in a Musical.McMartin’s numerous additional Broadway credits include Children From Their Games, Love for Love, Solomon’s Child, Is He Dead?, A Free Man of Color and Anything Goes. In 1973, he starred as Anton Schill in Friedrich Duerrenmatt’s The Visit. He played the same role in the musical adaptation at Chicago’s Goodman Theatre in 2009, opposite Chita Rivera. “Your sweet and gifted spirit will be missed,” Rivera wrote in McMartin’s online guest book following his death. “I’m so blessed our lives crossed.”McMartin is survived by his brother Jim, his partner Charlotte Moore (founder of the Irish Repertory Theatre) and his two daughters, Susan and Kathleen, from his previous marriage to Cynthia Baer (whom he had met when she was a producer on Little Mary Sunshine.) View Comments John McMartin(Photo: Bruce Glikas)last_img read more

Scientists in China believe new drug can stop pandemic ‘without vaccine’

first_imgPrevention and cure Using antibodies in drug treatments is not a new approach, and it has been successful in treating several other viruses such as HIV, Ebola and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS). Xie said his researchers had “an early start” since the outbreak started in China before spreading to other countries.Ebola drug Remdesivir was considered a hopeful early treatment for COVID-19 — clinical trials in the US showed it shortened the recovery time in some patients by a third — but the difference in mortality rate was not significant.The new drug could even offer short-term protection against the virus.The study showed that if the neutralizing antibody was injected before the mice were infected with the virus, the mice stayed free of infection and no virus was detected.This may offer temporary protection for medical workers for a few weeks, which Xie said they are hoping to “extend to a few months”.More than 100 vaccines for COVID-19 are in the works globally, but as the process of vaccine development is more demanding, Xie is hoping that the new drug could be a faster and more efficient way to stop the global march of the coronavirus.”We would be able to stop the pandemic with an effective drug, even without a vaccine,” he said. A study on the team’s research, published Sunday in the scientific journal Cell, suggests that using the antibodies provides a potential “cure” for the disease and shortens recovery time.Xie said his team had been working “day and night” searching for the antibody.”Our expertise is single-cell genomics rather than immunology or virology. When we realized that the single-cell genomic approach can effectively find the neutralizing antibody we were thrilled.”He added that the drug should be ready for use later this year and in time for any potential winter outbreak of the virus, which has infected 4.8 million people around the world and killed more than 315,000.”Planning for the clinical trial is underway,” said Xie, adding it will be carried out in Australia and other countries since cases have dwindled in China, offering fewer human guinea pigs for testing.”The hope is these neutralized antibodies can become a specialized drug that would stop the pandemic,” he said.China already has five potential coronavirus vaccines at the human trial stage, a health official said last week.But the World Health Organization has warned that developing a vaccine could take 12 to 18 months.Scientists have also pointed to the potential benefits of plasma — a blood fluid — from recovered individuals who have developed antibodies to the virus enabling the body’s defenses to attack it.More than 700 patients have received plasma therapy in China, a process which authorities said showed “very good therapeutic effects”.”However, it [plasma] is limited in supply,” Xie said, noting that the 14 neutralizing antibodies used in their drug could be put into mass production quickly. Sunney Xie, director of the university’s Beijing Advanced Innovation Center for Genomics, told AFP that the drug has been successful at the animal testing stage.”When we injected neutralizing antibodies into infected mice, after five days the viral load was reduced by a factor of 2,500,” said Xie.”That means this potential drug has [a] therapeutic effect.”The drug uses neutralizing antibodies — produced by the human immune system to prevent the virus infecting cells — which Xie’s team isolated from the blood of 60 recovered patients.  A Chinese laboratory has been developing a drug it believes has the power to bring the coronavirus pandemic to a halt.The outbreak first emerged in China late last year before spreading across the world, prompting an international race to find treatments and vaccines.A drug being tested by scientists at China’s prestigious Peking University could not only shorten the recovery time for those infected, but even offer short-term immunity from the virus, researchers say.  Topics :last_img read more