CTICC gets green makeover

first_imgThe Cape Town International ConventionCentre is getting an extensive greenmakeover. (Image: Rodger Bosch,MediaClub South Africa. For more freephotos, visit the image library.)Janine ErasmusThe Cape Town International Convention Centre (CTICC), an award-winning building that has been honoured numerous times for its advanced facilities, is about to undergo a R1.4-billion (US$100-million) expansion – one that will turn it into the greenest building in South Africa.Known as Phase 2, the new extension will boast wind turbines to generate its own electricity, a water treatment system, on-site sorting and recycling of waste, and a growing roof, among other environmentally friendly features. When complete, the new-look CTICC will use 40% less electricity per square metre and 90% less potable water, and will send 25% less waste to landfill than its current version.In order to achieve the reduction in power consumption several techniques will be used, such as daylighting, which refers to the controlled placing of windows, skylights and other transparent structures to admit as much natural light as possible and reduce the need for electric lighting. The new wing will also have its own renewable energy sources in the form of solar and wind power generators.With the water treatment plant as well as the planned recycling of rainwater, collected during Cape Town’s fierce winter season, the CTICC will slash its reliance on piped water by a massive 90%.The larger part of the 30 000m2 extension will be dedicated to environmentally friendly services, while an extra 9 500m2 of exhibition space will augment the existing 11 200m2. To encourage the use of green transport, the building will be incorporated into the city’s cycle routes, while extensive bicycle facilities will be available for staff and visitors.Rashid Toefy, CEO of the CTICC holding company Convenco, said that the new wing will feature some of the most progressive environmentally friendly technologies available. “We expect the new building to set some of the best international standards in sustainable building design and management,” he said. “The future of South Africa’s conference industry will be tied to this country’s ability to reduce its carbon footprint.”In fact, added Toefy, the expansion will not only propel Cape Town into the forefront of sustainable building design and management, but will continue to drive the city’s increasing standing as one of the leading business tourism destinations worldwide.Feasibility and economic impact studies were conducted over six months. The expansion will be built on the site of the old Customs House on the other side of the N2 freeway from the present centre, and will overlook Table Bay. Building is estimated to take three to four years.A valuable contributionIn the five years since its establishment the centre has grown from strength to strength, with conferences booked as far ahead as 2014. The CTICC has already contributed more than R9.5-billion ($1-billion) to the national economy and with the expansion it is expected to contribute a further R21.5-billion ($216-million) by 2013. In 2008 alone, according to economist Barry Standish and economic modeller Antony Boting of Cape Town University’s business school, the contribution to GDP was almost R2.7-billion ($273-million).In terms of job creation CTICC created 3 744 direct jobs in the Western Cape during 2008, with more than 5 300 indirect jobs created nationally. In total some 9 000 people have found employment through the CTICC.The centre has played a big role in the increased allure of Cape Town as a business tourism destination, and has also played host to a number of high-profile music and arts events. Besides the thousands of square metres of exhibition space the CTICC offers two stepped auditoria which seat 1 500 and 620 delegates each, a 2 000m2 grand ballroom which can accommodate up to 1 500 people, a roof terrace meeting room which overlooks Table Mountain, and 33 smaller meeting rooms which can hold from 25 to 330 people each.It also boasts three restaurants, a catering division run by a team of internationally trained chefs, and cutting-edge IT infrastructure. Situated conveniently close to the city centre and a number of major hotels, including the integrated five-star ArabellaSheraton Grand Hotel, there is no shortage of nearby useful facilities for delegates and visitors.As green as can beConstruction of the CTICC’s new wing will be carried out to the requirements set by the Green Building Council of South Africa. As green buildings, or buildings that are energy and resource efficient and environmentally responsible, become increasingly popular, the Council is leading the transformation of the local property industry to ensure that all buildings are designed, built and operated in an environmentally sustainable way for the benefit of all South Africans.Toefy expects the new CTICC to receive six green stars from the Council, which will begin its Green Star SA rating program in December 2008. This is the highest rating achievable.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at janineeEmediaclubsouthafrica.comUseful linksCape Town International Convention CentreGreen Building Council of South AfricaGreen Buildinglast_img read more

Press release: Brand South Africa and partners improving literacy in Western Cape

first_imgBrand South Africa partners with Bidvest Rally to Read and Barefoot No More to improve literacy and education in the Western Cape.Rally to Read has raised over R91-million, which is being used to improve education in rural areas. (Image: Brand South Africa)Johannesburg, Monday 16 October 2017 – Brand South Africa in partnership with Bidvest Rally to Read and Barefoot No More, will once again rally to the Western Cape to contribute to national efforts in improving literacy and education in the Province.Rally to Read is an initiative that was originally launched by the McCarthy Motor Group and is now organised by Bidvest to help improve education in rural South Africa. Every year, Rally to Read travels across ten school districts, in nine provinces to distribute reading and educational resources to disadvantaged schools. On Saturday, 21 October 2017 Brand South Africa will collaborate with the teams to Play their Part in the education space.Over the years the Rally to Read has had a positive impact on the lives of many communities and schools:• Over R91-million raised for rural education• 1025 – schools have been on the programme since 1998• 179 – rallies have been executed to date, covering all parts of rural South Africa (1998 – 2016)• 54 – Different areas/school clusters have been supported• 18 – Series of Rallies have been completed“Our partnership with the initiative is in recognition of the teachers for their hard work towards improving education. We all need to play our part and every little contribution has a progressive impact on the future of our children and the country”, said Brand South Africa’s Strategic Relationship for Business, Mr George Khoza.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact:Ntombi NtanziTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 81 704 1488Email: ntombin@brandsouthafrica.comVisit www.brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

Your Client Didn’t Abandon You. You Abandoned Them.

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now When you lose a long time client, it can feel like you’re being abandoned. You’ve stood together through what seems like a lifetime of battles and challenges, always finding a way, no matter how difficult. You had a relationship. Now it’s over.But it isn’t likely that your client abandoned you. It’s more likely that you abandoned them. One of the three following reasons is at the root of your loss. Study them, make changes, and prevent the loss of another client.NeglectThe most common way to lose a client is through neglect. Relationships require careful care and feeding. Ignoring your clients is a form of neglect.You used to call. You used to make appointments for face-to-face visits. You used to send articles that your client would find helpful in thinking about their business. Now . . . nothing. It’s been a long time. Too long.Neglect is form of abandonment. When you discover that your client has opened a new relationship with your competitor, they didn’t abandon you. You abandoned them.ComplacencyAnother way you can abandon your client is to become complacent.Remember how you used to ensure that all of your client’s problems and challenges were taken care of? Remember how you used to follow up to make sure that they were getting the results that they needed? Well they remember too. And they can feel the empty space where the salesperson that cared about them used to be.Because you have a client now doesn’t mean you are entitled to keep them. Just because you created tremendous value for them in the past doesn’t mean you have a right to their business in perpetuity.Complacency is a form of arrogance or a form of laziness, and either leads to abandonment.Failure to GrowYour client’s needs are going to change over time. They are growing and their needs are growing along with them. And if they’re struggling, their needs are changing too. In order to help your clients take advantage of the opportunities they come across, you have to grow. If they have greater challenges than ever, you have to grow big enough to help them overcome those challenges.If you don’t continue to grow, you aren’t going to have the ability to help your clients keep growing. If you are going to keep your client for life, you have to match—or exceed—their growth.Failure to grow is another form of abandonment. You force your clients to need a new partner?In all of these cases, you might feel as if your client abandoned you. The truth of the matter is that your neglect, your complacency, or your failure to grow was your abandonment of your client.QuestionsDid your client abandon you or you them?How does neglect lead to lost clients?How does complacency lead to lost clients?How does a failure to grow lead your clients to need someone new?How do you prevent abandoning your clients?last_img read more

UNP changes the constitution to give Sri Lanka an executive Presidency

first_imgWhen the United National Party (UNP) entered the final year of its Parliamentary term on July 23, even its most sanguine supporters conceded that the first five years had taken a heavy toll of its once heady popularity. In this fiercely politicised electorate, psephology is second cousin to astrology and,When the United National Party (UNP) entered the final year of its Parliamentary term on July 23, even its most sanguine supporters conceded that the first five years had taken a heavy toll of its once heady popularity. In this fiercely politicised electorate, psephology is second cousin to astrology and every man is his own opinion poller and pundit. Election forecasting is already an exciting and inexpensive national sport.If the electoral mood is distinctly ‘oppositional’, the opposition leadership is manifestly disoriented and dispirited. Not wholly of their own doing, this is the cumulative result of many finely calculated moves by President J.R. Jayawardene in his determined bid to break the familiar pattern of Sri Lanka politics, the in-out pendulum swing between the two main contenders, and the discontinuity in policy, chiefly economic policy.Using its four-fifths majority, the UNP changed the constitution to give the island an executive Presidency, introduced proportional representation (PR) with an unusually high cut-off point (12.5 per cent), and led an unprecedented frontal attack on the Opposition by depriving its formidable rival Mrs Bandaranaike of her civic rights for seven years. However, popular predictions hold that only the evident advantages of the PR system in conjunction with a fragmented Opposition can possibly give the UNP the largest number of seats in the next 196-member Parliament. In the circumstances, even a simple majority is considered doubtful.Strong Executive: Jayawardene’s proclaimed aim was a strong, stable executive, able to take “the hard unpopular decisions” necessary to escape the welfare system, an essential linchpin of Sri Lanka’s uniquely resilient democracy. An uncertain blessing, the “open economy” has the full backing of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the Sri Lanka Aid Group. The object of the exercise, the Opposition says, was merely the perpetuation of the party and the President in power.advertisement On its own, the right wing UNP has the strongest support base – an almost irreducible third of the national electorate. Only a Centre-Left alliance between the middle-of-the-road Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) and the traditional Left has been able, in recent years, to defeat the UNP. Now that alliance is in tatters.Yet the ruling party leadership senses a sullen, probably hostile electorate which has a notorious legacy of “throwing the rascals out” even when it has not been too enamoured of the alternative. The mass mood is a product of larger social and economic discontent. In his anniversary address and first formal TV appearance, President Jayawardene said that 50 per cent of Sri Lankans still earn only Rs 300 a month. The shops are full but the old system of subsidised essentials, despite the vexations of ration cards and queues at cooperatives, continues.Restricted Benefit: So far the benefits of the UNP’S faith in the ‘open economy’ and “the trickle down” theory have been reaped largely by the business community and the old propertied and privileged strata.Javawardene (left) and Bandaranaike: Picking up the piecesThe real rewards, the UNP argues, of the major projects (the Mahaveli diversion, the huge construction programme, the trade zones) will spread to the lower income groups in a few years. In an effort at ensuring a second term to reap the benefit of this delayed effect, the new August 3 constitutional amendment will enable Jayawardene to hold a Presidential poll even before the Parliamentary elections which are due by July next. Evidently he favours his own chances in single combat. If he wins, his party’s chances will probably improve. The move has made the Opposition disarray even more public. First to enter the list of contenders was Maitripala Senanayake, MP, long-time deputy of Mrs Bandaranaike, who now leads a rival faction which he claims is the “legitimate SLEP” Then came Dr Colvin R. de Silva, the leader of the socialist (formerly Trotskyist) LSSP (Lanka Sama Samaja Party).Next, with the Tamil United Liberation Front (TULF) not contesting the Presidency, was the very much smaller Tamil Congress (TC) which nominated its leader G.G. Ponnambalam Jr, a token Tamil contender. All eyes, however, were on Mrs Bandaranaike’s SLFP. The party’s central committee met on August 6 and Hector Kobbekaduwe, an ex-minister, was heavily tipped as the SLFP choice. He is backed by a radical, pro-China group led by Mrs Bandaranaike’s younger daughter, Chandrika Kumaratunge. However, Mrs Bandaranaike, sensitive to charges of favouritism, would be reluctant to nominate Kobbekaduwe who is her cousin.Consensus Candidate: Mrs Bandaranaike, the communists, the socialists and smaller left parties are in search of a “common candidate” to take on Jayawardene. Dr Colvin R. de Silva, a classmate of Jayawardene and a brilliant lawyer, is widely favoured.advertisementHe has two disqualifications: his Marxist politics and his caste. With the majority Sinhala-Buddhist vote quite evenly divided between the traditional rivals, the support of the minorities (Tamil, Christians, Muslims and Indian plantation labour) is a key factor. In the calculus of Presidential contests, such “block votes” could be vital. Since last year’s racial troubles, Jayawardene has taken a firm line of “racial-religious harmony”. Though he has paid great personal attention to Buddhist affairs, the UNP’S apparent solicitude for the minorities has aroused Sinhala-Buddhist chauvinism. A Colombo meeting of a new Sinhala-Buddhist organisation, launched by a group of monks and lay leaders, was attacked by a gang of intruders whom Opposition MP’S branded as pro-UNP goons. One of those injured was Professor Ediriweera Saratchandra, well-known playwright and former ambassador to Paris. He has been writing pamphlets and making speeches denouncing the new Singapore-style consumerism as an attack on the Buddhist value system. He appeared on Mrs Bandaranaike’s platform last month.Communal Violence: The anniversary week ended on an inauspicious note. Racial disturbances in Galle, the southern province capital, forced the Government to declare an Emergency, introduce censorship and impose a curfew in the area. Galle has a strong concentration of Muslims, traditionally a trading community monopolising the prosperous gem business. A quarrel over a parrot, a fight between a Muslim landlord and a Sinhalese tenant, and a Sinhalese schoolboy mistaken for a Muslim and assaulted, formed the familiar chain reactions of communal violence. There were two deaths, and several cases of arson. While the situation is now calm, the Government is investigating the possible involvement of “opposition elements”.last_img read more