Gaoth Dobhair mourns passing of Fred Coll

first_imgGaoth Dobhair is in mourning following the passing of former county councillor and soccer icon Fred Coll.The late Mr Coll, who passed away this morning, in Aras Ghaoth Dobhair, was a highly influential figure in the area.A long-time independent Councillor on Donegal County Council, he was one of the leading lights in the foundation of the Donegal Junior League in 1971. He had been one of the key figures in the re-forming of the Gweedore Celtic club in the 1960s following his return to the area from Scotland in the 1960s.Fred, from Derrybeg, is predeceased by his wife, Kathleen and is survived by a large family circle.In a tribute posted on social media, Gweedore Celtic said: “Fred Coll was the driving force behind the renaissance of soccer in Gweedore and as part of the Donegal League when it was established in 1971. “On his return from Scotland in the 60s he re-established Gweedore Celtic and along with Colm Mc Bride set in in motion a period of domination on the local soccer scene that lasted into the mid 80’s.“At a time when it was neither popular or profitable, Fred’s determination in establishing a strong soccer club in Gweedore was what drove him and others on to making Gweedore Celtic a force to be reckoned with and a club that made many friends throughout Donegal and further afield.“Rest in peace Fred. Everyone at the club would like to express our sincere condolences to the Coll Family at this sad time.“Ar dheis Dé go raibh a anam uasal.”His remains are reposing at his late residence.Funeral from there on Monday morning going to St Mary’s Church, Derrybeg for Requiem Mass at 11am with burial afterwards in Magheragallon Cemetery. Gaoth Dobhair mourns passing of Fred Coll was last modified: June 29th, 2019 by Chris McNultyShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Donegal Junior LeagueFRED COLLGaoth DobhairGweedorelast_img read more

49ers announce Joe Staley’s two-year contract extension

first_imgJoe Staley took the stage at the 49ers’ State of the Franchise event Wednesday night so CEO Jed York could break news that was hardly surprising.Staley, a 12-year cornerstone at left tackle, received a two-year extension on a contract that was to expire after this season. Financial terms were not disclosed by the 49ers nor Staley’s agent.“Honestly, Jed, since the moment you guys drafted me in 2007, it’s been my absolute honor to play for this franchise and I wanted nothing more than to …last_img read more

No turning back for 2010 hosts

first_img2009 promises to be another heady year for South Africa, but in just 12 months, hundreds of millions of people around the globe will be tuning in for the 2010 Final Draw, an event that will kick-start the biggest celebration this continent has ever seen. TNS Research Surveys, which has gauged public confidence levels over preparations for 2010, says every South African stands to benefit considerably from our hosting of this event. Nobody said it was going to be easy, and for South Africa, gearing to host the biggest single-code sporting event on the planet, 2008 has certainly proved to be more than a litmus test. As Fifa Secretary General Jerome Valcke recently remarked: “There is no turning back.” Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010 Xenophobia, widespread power cuts, the resignation of President Thabo Mbeki and a humanitarian crisis in Zimbabwe were just some of the distractions organisers of the tournament had to contend with. The grinding machinery tasked with building and renovating stadiums in all 10 host cities as well as numerous other 2010-related construction projects has performed remarkably well. So much so, that both Fifa and the 2010 Local Organising Committee have expressed confidence that South Africa will meet its 2010 requirements ahead of schedule. 24 December 2008 “We need to harness this energy to talk up the event,” the organisation said in a recent statement. “We recall the incredible energy and joy that swept the whole country when the bid result was announced. Negativity risks damaging this energy and can affect our actual ability to do what we know we can do.” In addition, preparations for the 2009 Confederations Cup – a key curtain-raiser for the World Cup – are on target, with tickets selling briskly. There was also good news on the crime front, with the launch of the recruitment process for 41 000 extra police officers by 2010 and the acquisition of high-tech security equipment – including helicopters, body armour and high-tech bomb disabling equipment – for the tournament. Apart from the labour disputes, spiralling construction costs and political in-fighting that are part and parcel of preparing for an event of this magnitude, there were plenty of other issues. And yet, there was much to draw hope and inspiration from. What a long, strange year it has been. South Africa’s preparations for the 2010 Fifa World Cup have been marked by extraordinary highs and lows.last_img read more

Veterinary Feed Directive implementation deadline coming soon

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The clock is winding down on implementing the Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) final rule from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.Some livestock farms are well on their way to have the necessary changes in place at the start of 2017, but others have much yet to do.“This is a huge issue. We will see over the coming months growth promotion and nutritional efficiency labels and uses of antibiotics that are also important to human medicine will be going away. The labels will change,” said Dr. Liz Wagstrom, chief veterinarian for the National Pork Producers Council. “If those antibiotics are used in feed, it will be illegal to use them to improve growth or improve nutritional efficiency. The remaining uses — the therapeutic uses for disease prevention control and treatment — will require a veterinarian to write a prescription if those are in water or a VFD if they are delivered in feed. This will be a huge cultural change and a very interesting transition. This is going to affect most of the antibiotics used in animal agriculture.”A current “VFD drug” is a drug intended for use in or on animal feed. These include tetracycline, penicillin, neomycin, tylosin and many others. Injectable over-the-counter antibiotics are not included in this rule, but mineral preparations and salt blocks containing affected antibiotics are a part of the VFD regulation.In the future, when a new animal drug application is submitted to FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine (CVM) for approval, CVM will evaluate the drug for safety and effectiveness, and as part of the review process, to determine whether the drug will be an over-the-counter (OTC) drug, a prescription (Rx) drug, or a VFD drug (limited to drugs used in or on animal feed).The changes are being mandated by the FDA due to ongoing concerns about the use of antibiotics (antimicrobials) in livestock production contributing to serious, and real, resistance issues.“We cannot deny that antibiotic resistance happens and that it makes human disease more difficult to treat. We also have resistant diseases in animals that make them more difficult to treat. It is a big public health concern that has been a driver for the FDA to make more changes,” Wagstrom said. “We can talk about how much, if any, contribution the use of antibiotics in animal agriculture contributes to human illness, but I think we are now to a point that it is not worth arguing how much. We just need to get our own house in order and use antibiotics responsibly and do our share to protect both animal health and pubic health.”The key moving forward for livestock operations is a close, and well documented, relationship between the farm and a veterinarian.“If a producer doesn’t have a strong relationship with a veterinarian, we are encouraging them to find one. You are going to need one and that veterinarian needs to be a part of your team who needs to know your animals, facilities and management before they can legally write you a VFD,” she said. “We hope you can view that as a contributor to your bottom line rather than an expense because we believe that relationship will strengthen your business as well as legally allow you to use antibiotics.”Frank Burkett III farms in Stark County with three uncles on a 690-cow dairy with another 700 replacements on feed. He sees the value in a close relationship with the veterinarian.“We have a great relationship with our veterinarian. When we look at the effect it will have on us, in addition to having a veterinarian-client-patient-relationship (VCPR), we’ll have to take an extra step in the future. Specifically for our farm, one example I can think of right away is that we use tetracycline to treat calves with respiratory issues,” he said. “So rather than just going to our feed supplier and getting it, we will need to take another step with our vet to write something along the lines of a prescription for that product for us to supply to our feed company so they can provide that product to us.”Without a well-established VCPR, the potential use for many of the important antibiotics in the operation could no longer be legal on the farm after Jan. 1, 2017. The final rule issued by FDA specifies the key elements that define a VCPR. These include that the veterinarian engage with the livestock producer to assume responsibility for making clinical judgments about animal health, have sufficient knowledge of the animal by virtue of patient examination and/or visits to the facility where the animal is managed, and provide for any necessary follow-up evaluation or care. The final rule will require veterinarians to follow state-defined VCPR requirements and all veterinarians will need to adhere to a VCPR that includes the key elements in the final rule.“The main concern is for people who don’t have that relationship with their veterinarian. There are areas of the state that are underserved by large animal vets — we are well aware of that. The livestock producers in those areas have been treating and making decisions on their own for their livestock and raising healthy animals for years. They can consult a vet when they need, but they have been making decisions on their own and using antimicrobials in a responsible way. Now this will put them in a position where they will have to establish that relationship and agreement in order to continue to use antimicrobials on the list,” Burkett said. “For our farm, it will just be some more paperwork involved with the process. The intention is more oversight so we can be sure antimicrobials are being used responsibly to prevent resistance in animals and humans. It looks like it will just be some additional paperwork and communication with our vet and our feed suppliers that we get those products from.”In addition, the label changes will mean some differences on the farm.“These antimicrobials in feed and water will have to be used based on the label. Right now they can legally be used under an extra label use but that will not be able to be done legally once this change takes place. The important thing is communication so producers are not surprised about this change as this moves forward,” he said. “We were at risk of losing the use of this class of antimicrobials altogether. This is a compromise to allow us to use them but add securities so we don’t build resistance. We want to make sure that this is not expanded in a way that becomes more burdensome.”In December 2013, the FDA published a guidance document on this issue, which called upon animal drug manufacturers of approved medically important antimicrobials that are put into water or feed of food-producing animals to voluntarily stop labeling them as drugs that can be used to promote animal growth and change the labeling of their products for the remaining uses to require veterinary oversight of these drugs when they are used for therapeutic purposes. All of the affected makers of these drugs committed in writing to participate in the strategy. Then in June of 2015, the FDA announced the VFD final rule to bring the use of these drugs under veterinary supervision so that they are used only when necessary for assuring animal health.“The actions the FDA has taken to date represent important steps toward a fundamental change in how antimicrobials can be legally used in food-producing animals,” said Michael R. Taylor, FDA deputy commissioner for foods. “The VFD final rule takes another important step by facilitating veterinary oversight in a way that allows for the flexibility needed to accommodate the diversity of circumstances that veterinarians encounter, while ensuring such oversight is conducted in accordance with nationally consistent principles.”last_img read more

HBO’s New Documentary “Spielberg” Is a Must-See for Aspiring Directors

first_imgHBO’s “Spielberg” is more than a biography, it’s a mini masterclass detailing some of the most influential scenes in the history of American cinema.Cover image via HBO.Warning: contains spoilers!The opening scenes of HBO’s newest documentary, Spielberg, might leave you at a loss of words. You aren’t expecting the iconic, creeping sunrise of the entrance into the desert sequence from David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia. Even more, you don’t expect to hear Spielberg say that it was Lean’s masterpiece that “set the bar too high” for the sixteen-year-old filmmaker — and that he no longer wanted to make movies. Fortunately, he didn’t quit.In fact, Lawrence of Arabia was a catalyst for the young filmmaker, who would return each week to watch, analyze, and dissect the film.It was the first time seeing a movie [wherein] I realized there are themes that are not narrative story themes, but themes that are character themes … David Lean created a portraiture; surrounded the portrait with a mural of scope and epic action; but at the heart and core of Lawrence of Arabia is “Who am I?” —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s the question “Who am I” that defines the arc of Spielberg’s career and serves as a focal point in Susan Lacy‘s newest documentary on one of American cinema’s greatest filmmakers.Video via HBO.What Can Aspiring Filmmakers Learn from Spielberg?The documentary is epic in scope: a veritable 2.5 hours of Spielberg unpacking pivotal scenes from films like Munich, Schindler’s List, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as well as several of his lesser-known early films and flops.Aspiring directors, screenwriters, and cinematographers can glean strategies and approaches for creating memorable and relatable characters, crafting visual stories using the tools of the cinema, and how Spielberg thrived in uncertain situations.But perhaps more importantly, we see the man behind the movies. And for those of us who grew up watching those movies, it’s a dose of inspiration on par with rapture.On Visual StorytellingImage via British Film Institute.For me, directing is camera work. So I’m very on the frontline of that. I’ve got to set up the shot, I’ve got to block the actors, choreograph the movement of the scene, bring the camera into the choreography, figure out where the camera stops, where it moves, how far it moves … so I’ve always got my eye on the lens and that’s what I do. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s evident, even in his earliest films, that Spielberg understands the medium; he just gets “camera work,” as he calls it. Moreover, he doesn’t rely on dialogue, music, or any sound effects to tell a story. In other words, he uses the visual nature of moving pictures and images to propel the narrative forward.To demonstrate this, turn off your sound, and watch this nail-biting scene from Munich.Video via YouTube.Without hearing a single line of dialogue, or swell in music, we know the following about the scene:The scenario (or location).The players involved.The stakes.The ticking clock.All of the things necessary for creating suspense.“Geography is one of the most important things to me,” says Spielberg, “so the audience isn’t thrown into chaos trying to figure out the story that you’re telling.”In this scene from Munich, Spielberg made deliberate choices about subject, camera placement, and movement. Not a single shot appears unless it earned its way into the reel — and thus propels the story forward. As audience members, we get a clear picture of who and where the players are — and in this case what would happen if the clock runs out.This is an excellent scene for directors and cinematographers to study.On LightingImage via I Can’t Unsee That Movie.Everything we do in this medium is about light and shadow. It’s how the cinematographer lights the actors, lights the set. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergGood lighting makes your actors look pretty; great lighting tells a story. Schindler’s List is an excellent example of this. Spielberg, working alongside his long-time friend and go-to cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski, crafted lighting setups that emphasized the personality and emotions of the characters at different stages of the story.Let’s examine the approach taken to light Amon Goethe and Oskar Schindler, the story’s main antagonist and protagonist, respectively.Amon Goethe, played by Ralph Fiennes, is a Nazi officer who is inhumane and unapologetically cruel in his treatment of Jews. Although he’s an extremely nasty fellow, he is never conflicted by his actions. You’ll notice in the film that he’s always lit beautifully from the front, with very minimal shadows — his character (and conscience for that matter) was very clear.In contrast, Oskar Schindler was a conflicted individual. Beginning the story as a shrewd businessman and member of the Nazi party, he slowly begins to question the morality of his by-standing. During this time of inner conflict, his lighting is directional and from the side, creating shadows on his face (see picture above). However, as the film progresses, his inner conflict subsides, and he’s lit with more frontal, softer light, because he’s learning who he is.Find opportunities to use light as a storytelling device — not only a means to expose your shot.On Uncertainty and FailureImage via Whale Bone Mag.There are going to be moments, where you get to set, and you are not going to know what the hell you’re doing. It happens to all of us; you’ve got to guard that secret with your life. Let no one see when you’re unsure of yourself … or you lose the respect of everyone. —Steven Spielberg quoting his mentor Henry Hathaway, SpielbergFailure is not optional — at least not for filmmakers. What Spielberg teaches us is that, with a little creativity, failure can lead to great success. There’s no better film that demonstrates this than Jaws.You may have heard the stories of the shark breaking down and sinking … all of it’s true.The original script for Jaws featured the shark everywhere, and it called for the great white to be on-screen far more often than what we saw in the finished film. However, due to frequent breakdowns and mechanical failures, the shark was in repair for a majority of the 100+ day shoot.Therefore, Spielberg and his team had to get creative. How could they employ a device that suggested the shark was near without actually showing the shark on-screen?“The yellow barrels were a godsend,” says Spielberg, who used the props to indicate that the shark was near and ready to attack. Paired with John Williams‘s, unforgettable score, the audience knew exactly when the shark was about to strike … and we were terrified.“If the shark had been available visually,” says Williams, “it would’ve changed the whole psychology of the experience.”Image via The Soul of the Plot.Spielberg premiered on HBO on October 7.Looking for more filmmaking inspiration? Check out these articles.Navigating the Challenges of the One-Take Short FilmA Look Inside the Post-Production Process Behind “It”Interview: Director of Photography Jake Swantko of Netflix’s Icarus“Five Came Back” — Lessons from Famous Directors During WWIIThe Power of Shooting with a Shallow Depth of Fieldlast_img read more