Parents to Receive Critical Support

first_img Parents are to benefit from critical support to improve child-rearing under the Partnership for Improved Safety and Security in Schools project.The project, which aims to reduce violence among students and youth, is being undertaken by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information through US$3 million in grant funding over two years from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).The National Education Trust (NET) is the coordinating agency for the initiative.Parenting Coordinator for the project, Latoya Stewart-Singh, said that a media campaign geared towards educating parents in good child-rearing practices will commence shortly.“We want to establish six community-based parent hubs and reactivate 25 school-based parent places. We want to identify and train at least 30 parent mentors per parish. We also want to audit 50 school-based parent places and assist in the reactivation of those places, with specific focus on training parents in good parenting practices as well as entrepreneurial skills,” she noted.She was speaking at a regional parenting stakeholders meeting for Region IV held on Friday (February 16) at the Holiday Inn hotel in Montego Bay.A parent place or hub is a resource centre where parents can access relevant information on parenting and other family-related issues geared towards improving parenting skills and family life.Managing Director of the NET, Marcia Phillips Dawkins, informed that the community of Mount Salem in St. James will be the first beneficiary of a parent place.She indicated that NET is working to set up homework centres in some institutions as well as at youth information centres (YICs) in a number of townships across the island. Another key component of the project, she said, involves working with uniformed groups, to engage young people.The Partnership for Improved Safety and Security in Schools project is targeted at young people aged 10 to 29 years. A total of 981 primary schools and 50 communities across the island will benefit.Among the specific objectives are to reduce violence, antisocial behaviour and critical incidents among youth, engage parents and communities in the behaviour change process, increase student involvement in co-curricular activities in order for them to develop better social and life skills, and promote positive values and attitudes at both school and community levels.The project will also involve construction and repair of perimeter fencing, provision of security monitoring equipment, and increasing the number of security personnel in schools. Parenting Coordinator for the project, Latoya Stewart-Singh, said that a media campaign geared towards educating parents in good child-rearing practices will commence shortly. Parents are to benefit from critical support to improve child-rearing under the Partnership for Improved Safety and Security in Schools project. The project, which aims to reduce violence among students and youth, is being undertaken by the Ministry of Education, Youth and Information through US$3 million in grant funding over two years from the United States Agency for International Development (USAID). Story Highlightslast_img read more

Documentary looks at the fiery life of Calgary magician Carisa Hendrix

first_imgAt the beginning of the documentary Carisa Hendrix: Girl on Fire, the magician and fire-eater tells a frightening tale about a stunt that went disastrously wrong a few years back.The Calgary performer, who broke the Guinness World Record for “longest duration fire-torch teething” in 2012, was trying something new involving a fuel-soaked cotton ball that was to be lit ablaze and popped into her mouth “like popcorn.” Unfortunately, when she rehearsed the bit, she wasn’t wearing stage makeup. On stage, she was. So when she lit the cotton ball on fire, flames leapt into her face. Back stage, she surveyed the damage, eventually putting her fingers on the burned areas.“All of the skin came off and wrinkled to one side like a layer of wet tissue paper,” she calmly tells the camera. “I was flipping out. I said, ‘You need to drive me to the emergency room. I think my skin is falling off.’” Login/Register With: Advertisement It’s a fairly compelling opening for Buddy Day’s new documentary, even if it suggests the director may have been a little too on-the-nose with his choice of title. But the further we get into the film, the more apparent it becomes that Hendrix’s fire-eating abilities are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to what makes her fascinating.“The fire-eating kind of falls away really quickly,” says Day. “You don’t want to lose it because it is very interesting. Although, ironically, the fire-eating is one of the least interesting things about her.”The novelty of her job, and the world record she broke in Italy at the age of 25, was what first drew Day to Hendrix as a subject for the documentary. He was looking for a followup to his 2015 efforts The Salvation of Todd Bentley, about a Pentecostal preacher who claims he can heal the sick and raise the dead; and Goalie: Life and Death in the Crease, about troubled NHL player Clint Malarchuk. He had heard of Hendrix’s varying talents, which include not only fire-eating but also barefoot walking on glass, stilt-walking, sleight-of-hand and variations of the “human blockhead” spectacle that can involve, among many other things, sticking scissors up her nose. Advertisement Advertisement Twitter Facebook LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

Theatre roles need to change following Soulpepper harassment allegations Winnipeg directors say

first_img Twitter Behind the scenes in Canada’s theatre community, a discussion about abusive behaviour has sprung up in the wake of allegations against one of the country’s most prominent theatre directors.Accusations of sexual harassment and assault against Albert Schultz, the co-founder and now former artistic director of Toronto’s Soulpepper Theatre Company, highlight the unique power imbalance that exists within the world of theatre, Winnipeg-based director Ann Hodges said.“I think what’s unique about theatre is that we ask actors to be emotionally available, we ask them to take risks, we ask them to respond to the director. We give the director the mandate to create a situation, to create a role,” she said in an interview Thursday on CBC’s Information Radio. The fact that many actors and directors are self-employed can make it difficult for people to speak out, Hodges said.“You don’t want to ruin your reputation and become known as a ‘difficult’ person or ‘unco-operative’ or anything like that.“There are so many other things that are involved in theatre that place people in a more vulnerable situation.”Four women have filed separate civil suits against Schultz, who resigned Thursday as Soulpepper’s artistic director, while vowing to challenge the allegations, which have not been proven in court. The women accuse him of unwanted groping, harassment and sexual remarks in the workplace over a period of 13 years. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Advertisementlast_img read more