Top 5 moments from Jon Gruden’s memorable bye week presser

first_imgOn his meeting with GM Reggie McKenzieIt’s no secret who calls the shots in the Raiders’ Alameda headquarters.Gruden has … ALAMEDA — If anyone has ever said head coach bye week press conferences are boring, they should’ve waited to listen to Jon Gruden.The more the Raiders lose the better Gruden is at the podium, and Tuesday that trend reached its peak.If you’re just catching up before the Raiders’ bye week, here are the best five moments from Gruden’s session in Alameda.last_img read more

Which Sharks forward will score next? Team depth makes it a guessing game

first_imgDENVER — If the right one doesn’t get you, the left one will.For the Sharks, it means if one line is not scoring goals, one or two others can make up the difference.At least that’s been the case through the first three games of their series against the Colorado Avalanche, as the Sharks’ top three lines have taken turns leading the offense and exposing the depth disparity between the two teams. The Sharks take a 2-1 series lead into Thursday’s Game 4.In Game 1, Joe Thornton and wingers Marcus …last_img read more

Panama Canal expansion boosting opportunity for U.S. ag

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest A violent lightening streak tore across the sky on a recent trip for a group of U.S. farmers to visit the Panama Canal.“When we were at one of the locks it was just clouding up and a crack of lighting came from nowhere. It is a much more intense lightening than we have here in Ohio and it startled a lot of people. The tour guide said that the lightening is a blessing because without that lightening there is no rain, and if there is no rain water, there is no canal,” said Jeff Magyar, a northeast Ohio soybean grower who was on the trip. “The canal is a giant freshwater lake. They lift you up 40 feet and they drop you down 40 feet on the coasts and you go through a giant lake in the middle. When they open the gates at either end, all of that freshwater runs out into the ocean. They cannot bring saltwater in because that would impact the environment. With the new lock they have big cement basins to catch a higher percentage of that water they get to re-use for the lake because they may not have enough rainwater in a dry year. The weather down there is like Florida where they get violent thunderstorms almost every day, but with much more magnitude in the storms. That is what keeps the environment going down there and that is what feeds water to the canal.”Magyar sits on the board of the Soy Transportation Coalition (STC) through his involvement with the Ohio Soybean Council. Because of the importance of the project to U.S. agriculture, the STC held its annual meeting in early December in Panama where around 100 U.S. soybean farmers (including Magyar) and staff members of soybean associations from around the country got a tour and received an update on the canal’s expansion from officials with the Panama Canal Authority. Along with the abundant rain, the U.S travelers definitely took note of the high temperatures and humidity.“I like the sun, but by noon or 1 in the afternoon there were not many people outside. It was like the hottest part of our warmest day in the summer at dawn down there and then it warms up for the rest of the day,” Magyar said. “It is all tropical rainforest around the canal. I never realized that they have such biodiversity there. It is amazing.”The Panama Canal recently celebrated a century in operation as a monumental achievement of mankind to add efficiency to world travel in a path cut through the wilderness.“The most impressive thing to me was that last year was 100 years in operation. The coast of that country is flatland and the middle of the country is mountains. They had to remove the mountain range 120 or so years ago. The magnitude of doing that 100 years ago was impressive. It is one thing to dig a ditch on the flatland. It is another to dig up a mountain range. Thousands of people died working on that project from malaria and yellow fever from the mosquitos,” Magyar said. “Today half of the money from the canal goes to keeping up the canal and the other half goes to the government. It is definitely a plus for American agriculture. It will also help South American agriculture but the U.S. is the No. 1 beneficiary. We were treated like royalty on the trip because American agriculture is still their top source of revenue for the canal.“I was shocked by the rates in the canal. I have read that the average fare through there is $80,000 to $100,000 but they were saying the average big, dry bulk shipment is more like $400,000. It takes 14 days to go around though.”The Panama Canal has proven to be a valuable shortcut for U.S. grain and soybean exports, connecting vessels loaded in the U.S. Gulf and at East Coast ports for destinations in Central America and Asia. The Panama Canal is wrapping up a $5.25 billion effort to expand its locks to meet current transit volumes, expand vessel transits supporting global trade growth, and to accommodate larger vessel sizes.Three out of every 10 bushels of grain and soybean exports from the U.S. go through the canal, accounting for more than half the exports through the Center Gulf, one-tenth of the Texas Gulf exports and nearly 30% of the Atlantic Coast exports. For soybeans specifically, the Panama Canal handles 44% of total U.S. exports — approximately 600 million bushels of U.S. soybeans annually.With the expansion, the canal will offer the potential for increased loading per vessel, larger vessel sizes to be used, decreased canal transit time, and lower transport costs overall. While in Panama, the group with the STC toured the current canal locks on both the Atlantic and Pacific sides of the country. In addition, participants were able to view the new expanded canal locks that are scheduled to be open for use in April.“It is incumbent upon farmers to not only be knowledgeable of and passionate about the supply and demand side of their industry. Farmers must also be knowledgeable of and passionate about the transportation system that allows supply to connect with demand,” said Mike Steenhoek, executive director of the Soy Transportation Coalition. “The Panama Canal — both the current and future expanded canal — is an important artery that allows the U.S. soybean industry to be so competitive in the international marketplace. Farmers need to understand this key link in our logistics chain, which will hopefully serve to increase our resolve and motivation to demand that our nation appropriately invests in our own transportation system. If we fail to make these investments in our ports, inland waterways, railroads, and roads and bridges, the expanded Panama Canal will truly be a missed opportunity.”There particularly importance with the canal expansion for Magyar specifically, who grows food grade soybeans for export from his farm in Ashtabula County.“I grow all food grade beans, but we also have a storage facility where we take commercial beans. I work with Western Reserve and we have 750,000 bushels of storage. I use our old facility to keep the food grade beans segregated,” Magyar said. “This will potentially lower shipping costs, particularly on container shipments to the Asian markets and also possibly the Eastern European markets where they are very interested in non-GMO beans. The U.S is still the most reliable supply of soybeans and this will help us get our soybeans to the end user at a lower cost.”The Panama Canal is even more valuable to eastern U.S. agriculture due to the West Coast shipping slowdowns resulting from ongoing labor disputes between the Pacific Maritime Association, which represents companies that own West Coast ports, and the International Longshore and Warehouse Union, which represents dock workers.“Ohio food grade soybeans are preferred in Asian markets, but our shipping costs have typically been the highest because they had to go by rail to the West Coast. But now, neither the customers nor the sellers want to deal with shipping through the West Coast because of all the issues they are having with labor out there. They are having so many problems shipping from the Pacific Northwest on the West Coast to Asia that more of our soybeans are going to be leaving from the Mississippi or the East Coast. They are saying that maybe the problems on the West Coast cannot be fixed,” Magyar said. “Now they are expanding the ports of Savannah and others and dredging them out to accommodate the new big ships that can go through the new Panama Canal. It is on the drawing board to get some of these ships that can utilize the new expanded canal into more American ports. There are half a dozen or so of these projects if the funding from Congress comes through. With the new canal for these big ships, we’ve got to be able to get them in our ports and nobody can rely on the West Coast ports right now because of the volatility there. Railroads have also been unreliable with the oil coming out of the Dakotas and that has been another issue with sending beans west.”In the end, the Panama Canal expansion will simply provide one more much-needed transportation advantage in the increasingly competitive world of agriculture, Steenhoek said.“With the expansion in the Panama Canal, we will be able to load ocean vessels that hold easily 500,000 more bushels of soybean per vessel. A typical ocean vessel today is loaded with 2.1 or 2.2 million bushels, so adding 500,000 bushels is substantial,” he said. “This is just shaving cents off the eventual delivered price at a time when agriculture is facing some headwinds from a strengthening U.S. dollar, a devaluation of the Brazilian Real, and a softening economy in China. This is a wonderful opportunity to provide benefits to U.S. agriculture by making our transportation system more efficient and making ourselves more competitive in the international marketplace.”For more on transportation and the Panama Canal, visit: soytransportation.org/issues.last_img read more

Communicating with your landowner

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Rented land is vital to the viability and profitability of our farms. As ownership of rented farmland is changing to individuals more removed from agriculture, establishing a sound relationship with your landowner will be key. Open lines of communication will directly affect gaining, retaining and even improving these important fields. It can also be effective in removing barriers as they relate to soil health and conservation practices that could enhance your profitability on rented land. Please join us to learn more about strategies and tools for communicating more effectively with your landowners. Information to be presented by Alan Sundermeier, OSU Extension and American Farmland Trust staff. A lunch will be provided immediately following the presentations at Luckey Farmers, Inc. 1200 Main St., Woodville, OH 43469. For more information or to RSVP, call the Wood Soil and Water Conservation District at 419-354-5517.last_img read more

Mobile TV Coming to 20 U.S. Markets by 2011

first_imgTags:#mobile#news#NYT#Video Services#web sarah perez The Mobile Content Venture (MCV), a joint effort by U.S. broadcasters, recently announced its roadmap for its mobile TV network. The roll-out plans to have 20 U.S. markets covered by the end of 2011. And we should see mobile TV-compatible devices by the second half of 2011.Could it be true? A real, broadcaster-led, freemium mobile TV service is launching next year?The consortium includes 12 broadcasters:  Fox, NBC, Belo, Cox Media, E.W. Scripps, Gannett Broadcasting, Hearst Television, ION Television, Media General, Meredith, Post-Newsweek Stations and Raycom Media.The markets MCV has announced are New York,  Los Angeles, Chicago, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Dallas, Washington D.C., Atlanta, Houston, Detroit, Tampa, Phoenix, Minneapolis, Orlando, Portland, Cincinnati, Greenville, West Palm Beach, Birmingham and Knoxville.About MCVYou may remember hearing something about a new mobile TV initiative earlier this year from a group calling itself Pearl (Pearl Mobile DTV Company, LLC). That’s actually the same group of broadcasters, it has just changed its name.In April, MCV, then called Pearl, announced its plans to re-use broadcast spectrum for mobile digital TV services to provide live and on-demand video, sports and entertainment programming and local and national news. The broadcast partners are providing the spectrum, marketing resources and capital to the venture.As technology blog GigaOm described it at the time, the decision to re-use spectrum was due to a “use it or lose it” push from the FCC, which was attempting to reclaim 120 MHz of spectrum for mobile broadband services. The broadcasters decided instead to keep the spectrum and launch the mobile TV venture, saying that it would lead to additional revenue streams and would help alleviate the strain on carriers’ mobile networks, already clogged by delivering mobile video. The Burden of Mobile VideoMobile video usage has grown substantially over recent months, contributing heavily to the mobile data traffic surge. In February of this year, for example, Cisco pegged mobile data traffic at 40 exabytes for 2010 (one exabyte = 1 billion gigabytes), much of it due to mobile video. In fact, Cisco said that by 2014, 66% of all mobile data traffic would be video.This morning, new data from video site MeFeedia again confirmed this trend, showing an increase in video traffic in 2010 – up 60% this year, it’s saying. iPhone, Android and iPad devices have contributed to this growth, with traffic up 22% since April on iPhone, up 200% on Android and up 325% on iPad.Is MCV Really Happening?Consumers may wonder whether or not this announcement means a whole lot at this point. Burned by previous attempts at mobile TV efforts (see, for example, Qualcomm’s now closing FLO TV service), there’s a bit of “I’ll believe it when I see it” sentiment out there these days regarding mobile TV ventures.For what it’s worth, the analysts at iSuppli are somewhat bullish on the possibilities for MCV, citing three main aspects to the service that provide it with a better chance than prior efforts. First, the technology it uses (ATSC M/H) is cheaper than others (DVB-H or MediaFLO, the latter which was used by Qualcomm) because it leverages existing infrastructure. Second, the venture is broadcaster-led, meaning it will have a good content portfolio and will be better designed to match up with consumers’ viewing habits and exceptions. And third, the technology (ASTC M/H) is backed by handset makers LG and Samsung, which will help bring devices to market.iSuppli also notes that MCV is likely to go for a business model involving both free and paid-for content to help push consumer adoption.That being said, there are also several challenges MCV must overcome. It needs to get operator commitment to integrate with cellular networks, and it needs to be able to offer handset subsidies, mobile billing and produce nationwide marketing campaigns. In fact, mobile operator support for MCV is key, without it, the initiative will probably not survive. So for now, cautious excitement only – but when you hear MCV announcing operator partners, you then have our permission to shout “hooray for mobile TV!” Image credits: DVICE, HotHardware Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaceslast_img read more

Professionally Pursue Your Dream Client

first_imgOne of my clients discovered that one of his dream clients was considering a change. They are unhappy with the results they are getting from the 800-pound gorilla in the industry, and they are now open to looking for a company that will get them the results they need. When my client’s company’s name came up, the very senior executive said, “I haven’t heard from anyone there since January.”The statement that no one had called on him for almost nine months wasn’t an offhand remark. It was an indictment. What he was saying is that if my client’s company wanted his business, they would have continued to call on him during the intervening months. Most of the time, the prospective clients of my client calls on an RFP, so most salespeople don’t call on their prospects during the intervening years when they are locked into a contract. It’s interesting that the very C-Level executive doesn’t care about what’s customary. He thinks the people who want his business should be pursuing him.Never Give UpThis story is a lesson for salespeople, especially as it pertains to the pursuit of their dream clients.It isn’t enough to express a passing interest in your dream client or to occasionally check to see if their dormant dissatisfaction has developed enough that they are primed to move. It isn’t enough to call quarterly to check in, or to meet up with your dream client contacts at industry events. These small, infrequent touches, betray a self-interest, teaching your dream client that you only care about them when there is an opportunity for you to compete for their business.Never Go AwayThe truth of the matter is that the competition is occurring right now. The mindshare is being developed between the intervening periods where no salespeople are calling on the dream client because they know that they have a contract and relationships. The relationships that create opportunities develop over time, and relationships are something that can’t be easily developed when you are transactional.If you are going to pursue your dream client, pursue them. Continually call, nurture, and meet with the contacts within your dream client’s company. If you are sporadic in your effort, you will be indicted for your lack of professional pursuit. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

Andreescus storybook US Open run stands alone in Canadian sports lore

first_imgMost of us have never seen her lose.That’s how fast and unexpected and remarkable this has been. Way back on March 1, in the semi-finals of the Mexican Open, a third-tier event in Acapulco, Bianca Andreescu fell in three sets to Sofia Kenin, then the 35th ranked player in the world. She took home a check for $11,500.She had made a bit of noise earlier in the season, beating Venus Williams and Caroline Wozniaki in Auckland en route to the Australian Open as a qualifier, but beyond the tennis hard core, those victories hardly caused a ripple.And before that, Andreescu was precisely as famous as you’d expect the 152nd ranked player in the world to be.Then, immediately after Acapulco, Andreescu won Indian Wells, sort of the fifth major, and this crazy ride began.Her only two losses since, a retirement and a walk-over, were forced by injury. Andreescu has otherwise been untouchable. The odd wobble here, the brief loss of form there, but no one has been able to beat her when she was able to finish a match, and there is every reason to believe that in this moment, she is the finest female tennis player on Earth.That truth was, of course, hammered home on Saturday afternoon, when Andreescu defeated the greatest female player in history, Serena Williams, in straight sets in the final of the U.S. Open — the first Grand Slam victory by a Canadian.It wasn’t quite prime time Serena, at age 37, but it was very, very good Serena, riding an emotional high after dominating her side of the draw. So no asterisks here. Just try and come up with a historical list of the players Andreescu wouldn’t have beaten that afternoon in Flushing Meadows.The image of her victory, Andreescu lying on the court, spread eagled as though about to make a snow angel, staring into the New York sky, is already one that belongs on a stamp. She has been propelled over those eight months from obscurity to full-on national sports hero.And we, as a country, have entered uncharted territory. You can start searching for comparables, but they just aren’t really there.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>In tennis, Carling Bassett made it as far as the U.S. Open semis, and Milos Raonic and Genie Bouchard both made Grand Slam finals – Bouchard also made it to two Grand Slam semis – and peaked at number three in the world. Perhaps it’s merely the power of hindsight that paints those results as unsustainable, but the truth is, none of them won, and for all of the excitement in the moment, it didn’t feel anything like this.In other individual sports, there’s Mike Weir winning the Masters and Lennox Lewis winning the heavweight championship, Brooke Henderson’s recent triumphs and Ben Johnson and Donovan Bailey and a long list of Olympians who at least temporarily captured the country’s heart.None of those, though, came so quickly, so out of the blue.Emotionally, the can’t-stop-smiling part of this feels closest to the Raptors’ championship, not just because of She The North, but by the way something went from specific to universal so quickly, by the way it became one big, ecstatic social-media driven national hug.And now to figure out who this young woman is, since there hasn’t really been time for that. Even the marketers are scrambling to catch up.You will hear very much in the coming days about her parents and their classic, immigrant story (not a bad time to be reminded of just how Canadian that story is….), about her little dog Coco, about her coach Sylvain Bruneau, about her dogged rise through the ranks when no one was paying attention, about the sacrifices made, about her diet and training regimen, about how she might fare in Melbourne in January, about how she’ll approach the red clay of Roland Garros or the grass courts of Wimbledon next summer, about what it will be like to return to New York as a defending champion, with expectations turned on their head.How Andreescu handles that whirlwind will be telling. But absolutely no one is doubting that she has the tools, and the varied, nuanced game, to continue to succeed at this level.At age 19, it’s understandable that Andreescu doesn’t really have the words to describe what she’s living through. In some ways, she is processing it along with the rest of us.But there is a look in her eyes that, in the context of what we have just witnessed, speaks to a level of confidence that only the greatest athletes possess. It’s as if she was shocked by the moment, yet absolutely unsurprised by the result.Amazing enough when it comes from a Tom Brady or Sidney Crosby. On a whole other level when it comes from a teenager who has never been this way before.Emotionally, it might never be so sweet and fresh and beautiful again, and Canadian sports fans have been historically conditioned to wait for bubbles to burst.But there’s nothing to dread here. Instead sit back, savour what we’ve just witnessed, and imagine the journey to come.last_img read more