Editors vs Art Directors Part II

first_imgCatherine Neill Juchheim, my art director at Southern Breeze, the REAL magazine I edit, says that it is essentially up to the A.D. to ride herd over the material as well as the editors and sales people. “Whether it is a duel with the editor (no, 1,000 words of copy will NOT fit there!) or a fight with the sales guys over those last minute ads (and money always wins), it is up to the intrepid art director to make it work.”Anthony Picco, who served as my art director for four years at a not-for-profit, completely understood and agreed with my comments because we respected each other’s profession as well as each other as people. “My job is to make the information in the magazine attractive, readable, and enjoyable,” Tony says. “I fully understand that there are times that business politics dictate cover choices or lead articles. I have no problem accommodating that. In a healthy working relationship, I am happy to listen to editors’ suggestions.”However Tony admits that he prefers less specific comments from his editors (“The cover looks too busy,” or “This article has to look spectacular”). He adds that nothing annoys him more than when an editor tries to do HIS job with the “Make that type red” or “I want the type justified, not flush right.” Or as he puts it: “Nothing drives an art director crazier than an editor who is a frustrated art director.”Another former cohort, Samuel Fontanez, who worked as a staff artist and is now art director of a magazine I used to oversee, took exception to my seemingly iron-fisted management mantra. “While I agree it’s the editor’s job to reel in the A.D. into reality when he thinks they’ve gone too far, [the editor] is not the only person on staff privy to the magazine’s audience,” he says. “Any art director who doesn’t know the audience or industry he or she is doing layouts for is basically a temp who has overstayed his or her welcome. So I think we deserve a little more credit in that area.”John Scott, another former colleague who worked on two monthly publications where I was the managing editor, feels a lot of the issues between editors and their art doyennes are simply due to ego. “I think all editors and art directors have big egos, whether or not they admit it, so naturally there will always be clashes,” John wrote in his response to my initial post. “However, it is the ones on both sides that know how to control their ego and not let it get in the way that are the most successful. It is a team effort and there must be mutual respect and a bit of humility.” John adds that if those egos get out of control, the end product will suffer and the work situation will be miserable. “Do you want to be right or do you want to be happy? That’s always gotten me through plenty of situations.” Many of the initial blog responders took issue to the “art director is always the wife” statement comparing the editor/A.D. relationship to a marriage. Sam was no exception. To wit, he says that if art directors are the wife, “then I suggest we make Lorena Bobbit our patron saint!” (Anyone who doesn’t remember Lorena, Google her. And by the way, Sam … ouch!)Catherine was also not a fan of the husband and wife mentality and stresses equality among the players. “It’s the 21st century now, people; how many wives out there are truly subservient to their husbands?” she ponders. “It’s an equal partnership or else it ends in divorce.”John admitted that the “editor has final say,” but added that doesn’t necessarily mean they are always right. I agree with this sentiment whole-heartedly. In one of my blog comments, I talked about how my art director and I were seemingly up against the editor-in-chief (who had been in that specific industry for over 15 years) and a mousey associate editor regarding a particular cover design. Jonathan, the A.D., created a stunning, emotional visual from an idea I had. Instead, the EIC opted for tired stock art that did nothing for the magazine. [PS: The magazine folded five months later and Jonathan and I are the only ones still working in the magazine industry.]Unlike John, Tony acquiesced: “The editor is always right, in theory,” he says, “but there are ‘Editors from Hell’ and I have worked for some of them. What does an art director do when an editor has no taste whatsoever—not even bad taste—and yet that editor wants to interfere? What do you do with a micromanager editor who believes you can only do your job properly if your hand is held every step of the way, from concept to completion? Ultimately, I have been fortunate—only about 70% of the editors I worked for were insane.”Whether or not an editor is always right, Catherine agrees that it is the editor—not the art director—who has the first and last word with a magazine. “It is the editor who writes or assigns the stories that sets the tone for the art director to follow,” she says. “It is the art director’s vision that brings those stories to life across the pages, but it is the editor’s determination as to whether the art director’s vision is in keeping with the spirit of the editorial written.”Art directors lucky enough to have good editors basically have free reign with the look and feel of a magazine, which comes from mutual respect, according to Catherine. “It’s also an open communication atmosphere where the editor and art director freely share ideas and perhaps even cross the lines of responsibility at times. Mark listens to any story ideas that I might have for Southern Breeze and I listen to him when he has an idea for an image to go along with something he has written. We also tell each other pretty candidly when we think something isn’t going to work, and why. That way, both parties are invested in all aspects of the magazine, and both are driven to produce the best issue they can, time and time again. That is the only way to a successful magazine.”However, an atmosphere where the editor and art director are constantly at odds will only result in a second-rate magazine and a very tense environment. “There is just no way a publication can succeed if the two ‘parents’ are constantly fighting,” Catherine says. “That will just produce a take-side atmosphere and pretty soon the whole office is in an us-versus-them uproar and nothing good will come from that.”And the final word has to go to Catherine: “To the editor who may consider his or her art director a freak or diva: it takes one to know one. And I think Mark would agree!!”Boy do I! Apparently my last blog post—Editors vs. Art Directors—really struck a nerve, judging by the number of responses (22 by my last count). When the attacks got personal (name calling, questioning the legitimacy of my own magazine, etc.) it made me realize that there are some pretty deep-seeded feelings on this issue.The overall point of the last blog was that while the editor and art director are partners, the burden of responsibility always falls onto the editor. I’ve seen a lot more editors than art directors lose their jobs due to a magazine’s poor performance in my career. However, I have routinely seen art directors get the majority—if not all—of the praise for how great a magazine has turned around while the efforts of the editorial staff go totally unnoticed. That said, many of the art directors whom I sent the blog link to agreed with my comments. Maybe it helped that we worked (or still work) together in some capacity, or that they understood, not only where I was coming from, but my healthy attitude toward art directors.last_img read more

Qualcomms not a monopoly Japan decides after decadelong investigation

first_img FTC vs. Qualcomm: Why you should care Share your voice Qualcomm is the world’s biggest provider of mobile chips, and it created technology that’s essential for connecting phones to cellular networks. The company derives a significant portion of its revenue from licensing those inventions to hundreds of device makers, with the fee based on the value of the entire phone, not just the components. But not all licensees want to pay as much as Qualcomm charges, and governments around the world have been investigating Qualcomm’s licensing practices for anticompetitive practices.In September 2009, Japan said investigations into Qualcomm found the company was violating the country’s Antimonopoly Act when it came to trade practices. The inquiries found that Qualcomm coerced Japanese handset manufacturers, such as Sony, to sign contracts that prevented them from asserting their own intellectual property rights. “This tends to impede the Japanese manufacturers’ … incentive to engage in research and development pertaining to technologies related to CDMA subscriber units, CDMA base stations and semiconductor integrated circuits used therein and tends to further strengthen Qualcomm’s influential position in the market pertaining to the technologies, thereby tending to impede fair competition in the technology market,” the JFTC said at the time. The Tokyo High Court in 2010 issued a stay on the cease-and-desist order. Since then, the JFTC has held 37 separate hearings on the case, Qualcomm said, and it rejected an initial finding related to cross-license agreements between Qualcomm and Japanese manufacturers. But it ultimately determined that Qualcomm’s licensing practices didn’t violate antitrust law.  Comments Tags See also 2:11 Phones Components Tech Industrycenter_img Now playing: Watch this: 4 Qualcomm Japan isn’t the only government body that’s investigated Qualcomm. The US, South Korea, China and the European Union are other governments that have scrutinized Qualcomm’s business practices. All have probed whether Qualcomm hurt competition by demanding licensing terms that ultimately forced handset makers to exclusively use its chips. Though many have slapped Qualcomm with fines, none have forced it to change its licensing practices. In China in early 2015, Qualcomm agreed to pay a $975 million fine and lower its licensing fees to settle the dispute in that country. South Korea slapped the company with a $850 million fine the following year, which Qualcomm is appealing. The EU in early 2018 fined Qualcomm $1.23 billion for paying Apple to use only its chips, something Qualcomm also is appealing. And in August of that year, the company reached a settlement with Taiwan, where the country would keep the $93 million Qualcomm had paid, but the company wouldn’t owe anything more.In January, Qualcomm and the US Federal Trade Commission met in a San Jose, California, courtroom to battle over an antitrust case. The FTC has accused Qualcomm of operating a monopoly in wireless chips, forcing customers like Apple to work with it exclusively and charging excessive licensing fees for its technology. The case is now in a judge’s hands. At the same time, Qualcomm is battling its former major customer, Apple. In January 2017, the iPhone giant sued Qualcomm over its licensing practices. Qualcomm has filed countersuits and also accused Apple of patent infringement. The two have been battling in a San Diego court for the past two weeks over patents, and they’ll meet again in April over the licensing dispute.On Thursday, a judge dealt Qualcomm a blow in the upcoming licensing case. US District Court Judge Gonzalo P. Curiel of the Southern District of California ruled that Apple can keep the billions Qualcomm paid it as part of their 2013 contract. And Qualcomm is still on the hook for payments it stopped making.  Qualcomm-FTC lawsuit: Everything you need to know Qualcomm can’t get back the billions it paid Apple, judge rules What the Apple-Qualcomm battle means for your next iPhone Qualcomm’s licensing practices have been facing scrutiny around the globe.  Shara Tibken/CNET Qualcomm isn’t a monopoly after all, a Japanese regulatory body said Friday, reversing its decision from about a decade ago. The Japan Fair Trade Commission this week canceled a cease-and-desist order from 2009 that affected Qualcomm licensing in Japan, effectively declaring that Qualcomm wasn’t guilty of the charges against it. JFTC officials said the decision is “unusual,” according to a report from Nippon, and that this is the first time it’s revoked a cease-and-desist order since 2012. The decision gives Qualcomm a win as the company awaits a judge’s decision in the US’ probe into its business practices. “We are very gratified to learn that after years of considering the evidence and applicable legal authority, the Japan Fair Trade Commission has concluded there was nothing improper about Qualcomm’s cross-licensing program,” Don Rosenberg, Qualcomm general counsel and executive vice president, said in a statement. “Today’s decision affirms our confidence that once Qualcomm was afforded a full hearing, and actual evidence was considered, the JFTC would find that our cross-licensing program was completely lawful and the product of arms-length, good-faith negotiations with our Japanese licensees.” last_img read more

Meghan Markle sidelined at Trooping of Colour 2019 Duchess of Sussex snubbed

first_imgMeghan MarkleGetty ImagesMeghan Markle made her first public appearance after the birth of baby Archie at Trooping the Colour 2019. But it looks like fans are not pleased with where the couple Sussex were made to stand during the Trooping the Colour balcony photos. Were Meghan and Harry sidelined during the celebrations?Reportedly last year, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry were seen standing behind Prince Charles and the Queen for the iconic pictures. But during this year’s celebrations, the new parents were less visible, tucked to one side and behind Prince Andrew. This did not sit well with Royal fans who took to social media to express their outrage. Most of the complains ranged from how shameful it was that the couple Sussex was relegated to the background and how there weren’t many pictures of Meghan.  Meghan MarkleGetty ImagesSeveral royal fans apparently wanted to know why they were positioned at the back of the balcony, and asked whether there is a “royal order” in place for the official photographs. Joe Little, managing editor of Majesty magazine, told People magazine: “She was not as prominent perhaps as some people might have expected, but there’s a pecking order.”The pecking order is very important for the Royal Family, but even so, Meghan and Harry could have been placed more strategically, so that they could have been a little more visible. It was Meghan’s first public appearance after her maternity leave after all. However, some fans were overjoyed to catch any glimpse of the Duchess of Sussex, no matter how small the glimpse was. Meghan Markle may soon be resuming her Royal duties now that it looks she is done with her maternity leave. You can check out the video here:last_img read more

Millennials Fuel Renewed Interest In Vinyl Records

first_imgRecord Store Day is an annual April event at independent music stores. But a second, slightly smaller version of the event happened on Black Friday. Over the weekend at Cactus Music here in Houston, there were live in-store music performances and lots of special limited releases — many by major artists.You’ll find Quinn Bishop behind the counter at Cactus. “Record Store Day, and the limited edition releases that come with it, has been kind of a game changer for us. And you build upon that with the Shop Small Saturday that comes directly after that. It really calls to people to spend locally, and that really helps us as well,” he said. Many artists release limited edition vinyl for Record Store Day — special ten-inch records or picture discs, often with out-of-print or unreleased material. “You’re always gonna see a piece from Bob Dylan, from the Beatles, from the Rolling Stones,” he said. “You’re seeing some of the more curated smaller labels that specialize in dead art, so to speak. You know, records that never even made it to the CD format.” That’s because many early CDs were only greatest hit collections or major releases. Sales of vinyl shrunk as CDs came along and then mp3 downloads. But Bishop says vinyl is making a resurgence. “And where vinyl was 15 percent of our business almost ten years ago, it’s now over, it’s almost 55 percent of our business now,” Bishop said.  It’s not a case of nostalgia or fascination with a retro technology. “You have these millennials. Well, their parents did not own records –their parents owned CDs or cassettes. So for them, they see vinyl and turntable culture as something that’s their own. I mean, they’ve claimed it as defining their generation,” he said.  Bishop sees a growing number of music fans with what he calls a “bookshelf mentality.” “They plow through everything out there that’s of interest to them,” he said. “And they kind of distill it into the things that, the music that defines them, and they buy that on LP and that’s what’s on the shelf. It doesn’t mean that they have every recorded work by somebody that they casually put on their phone. But they buy those albums.” And Bishop doesn’t expect to see the CD dying off anytime soon. He says despite the convenience of having music on your phone, downloaded music just doesn’t sound as good, and music fans are finding that listening to a CD in your car sounds better than streaming music. Listen 00:00 /02:35 Quinn Bishop from Cactus Music looks through the store’s collection of vinyl records – a format that’s enjoying a resurgence. Xcenter_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Sharelast_img read more

ERA appeals against Dwejra restaurant extension

first_img SharePrint The Environment and Resources Authority (ERA) has filed an appeal in order to ask the Court to revoke and cancel the decision given by the Environmental Review Tribunal and the Planning Authority, which would grant a restaurant in Dwejra an extension. In its appeal, ERA claimed that the Tribunal failed to apply or misinterpreted the Strategic Plan for the Environment and Development (SPED), which protects biodiversity, cultural heritage, geology and geomorphology, by safeguarding protected areas. ERA believes that the Tribunal also failed to recognize the problems arising from the intensification and expansion of development at Dwejra. The site is considered a Special Protection Area (SPA) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC) and is part of the Natura 2000 network because of its ecological importance. Read: ERA to appeal Dwejra permit – HerreraThe application intends to increase the seating capacity of the restaurant space in question. ERA believes that this extension will result in more light and noise in the area that are detrimental to wildlife. ERA believes that the development will lead to the intensification of light pollution, especially at night, in an area that is a designated Dark Sky Heritage Area. Although the Tribunal observed that the operation of the restaurant, including the use of artificial lighting, remains under scrutiny by the authorities concerned, ERA believes that it is best to avoid these circumstances in the first place. Read: 15 NGOs file an appeal against Dwejra restaurant developmentThe Tribunal had to consider that the proposed development is detrimental to biodiversity, especially on the population of Scopoli’s Shearwater and Yelkouan Shearwater, that are particularly sensitive to light and sound and are known to nest in the area.Read:  ‘Malta is shooting itself in the foot’ – NTM-FEE on approved Dwejra plansWhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more