Delight for thrifty shoppers as NCBI store reopens in Ballyshannon

first_imgCharity shop and sustainable fashion fans will be happy to hear that the National Council for the Blind of Ireland (NCBI) store in Ballyshannon is reopening.A new chapter begins for the fundraising shop as Natalie Quinn takes up the reins as Shop Manager from popular former Manager Naomi Brady.The store will be full of great quality second-hand items once more, with a treasure trove of shoes, household items, books and a large selection of bric-a-brac to discover. The NCBI is appealing for volunteers to get involved with stock and customer service.Grainne Whiteside, Area Manager said “reopening the Ballyshannon shop was a priority for NCBI as it is so embedded in the local community. We will continue to sell quality preloved clothing, accessories and bric a brac. We call on anyone interested in volunteering with the NCBI shop to contact us; even giving us as little as three hours a week would be of great assistance. Pop in and see our new selection of stock”.NCBI’s chain of 115 shops play a vital and integral part in the charity’s overall fundraising efforts, allowing the national sight loss agency to provide vital life changing services to over 6,000 people each year, many of whom live in Donegal.Also by supporting shops, customers not only generate funds for NCBI services but support the drive for more environmentally friendly and sustainable fashion and furniture. If you are interested in volunteering please contact Natalie Quinn, Shop Manager on 0858211128 or shopvolunteer@ncbi.ieDelight for thrifty shoppers as NCBI store reopens in Ballyshannon was last modified: October 9th, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ballyshannonncbishoplast_img read more

2010 ticketing call centre opens

first_img15 February 2010The Fifa World Cup ticketing sub-committee will open a call centre this week to assist soccer fans who want buy tickets for the 2010 World Cup.Committee chairman Horst Schmidt said the call centre will operate on weekdays from 10.30am until 7.30pm South African time.“The fans understand that time is crucial now, as the tickets are allocated on a first come, first served basis and that they should not wait for the last minute over-the-counter sales,” he said.The call centre will use the South African number 083 123 2010 as well as the international number +41 44 583 2010.Fourth round of ticket salesSchmidt said the first 100 hours of the fourth ticket sales phase had already seen a total of 74 146 tickets being sold, while an additional 130 000 applications were still being processed.However, the confirmations were expected to be sent by the beginning of this week. This second-last sales phase, which kicked off on 9 February, will run until 7 April.“We have already had more than 200 000 tickets requested within 100 hours, a number we are truly happy with,” he said.Source: BuaNewslast_img read more

Gallery: The People’s Bus

first_imgPhotographs by Nicky Rehbock. Compiled by Mary Alexander Workers at the MAN bus factory, schoolchildren and the team from Brand South Africa had a good party at the launch of the People’s Bus roadshow, which will take football fever to the most remote parts of South Africa.Read the full storyClick on a thumbnail for a larger image, or right-click on the link below it to download a high-resolution image.  • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image • Download high-resolution image MORE GALLERIESlast_img read more

What is the role of the Gauteng Industrial Development Zone (GIDZ)?

first_imgGlobalisation is upon us and South Africa is ensuring readiness by adopting what is called Specialised Economic Zones (SEZ). According to Investopedia, an SEZ is a designated area in a country subjected to specialised economic regulations different from other areas. These zones play a huge role in encouraging trade and investment opportunities that benefit the country through job creation.The Gauteng Industrial Development Zone Company (‘Gauteng IDZ’) was founded in 2009 under the Gauteng Growth and Development Agency (GGDA) and was established with the purpose of developing and operating the designated Industrial Development Zone at OR Tambo International Airport. OR Tambo International Airport accommodates over 21 million passengers annually, making it Africa’s largest and busiest international airport.The vision of the GIDZ is “to identify, design, package and enable focused export driven manufacturing and beneficiation programmes for location at the OR Tambo International Airport IDZ. OR Tambo International is known for its exceptional infrastructure and resources. It is a well-positioned logistics and distribution hub for air cargo internationally and in the region. OR Tambo international is the largest air cargo airport on the African continent, with the capacity to handle 40 000 tonnes annually. 82% of South Africa’s cargo comes through OR Tambo.”How does an IDZ impact citizens? In an effort to reposition itself in the world economy, the South African government launched the Industrial Development Zones (IDZ) programme with the aim to facilitate inclusive and competitive economic growth in order for citizens to enter new jobs and benefit from the investments attracted.The GIDZ also runs a post-graduate Jewellery Design course called Design@50. The Jewellery Design Centre was established in 2013, and puts students through an 11-month course offering training in Marketing, Commercial Jewellery Design and Product Development, utilising state of the art Computer Aided Design (CAD) and Manufacturing technology. The centre aims to increase technology proficiency ahead of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and pave the way for skilled designers by shaping talent that can contribute to the development of the South African jewellery market.Design@50 was launched as part of the OR Tambo Industrial Development Zone, currently under construction next to OR Tambo International Airport.To find out more about the GIDZ, click here: http://www.gidz.co.zalast_img read more

Marketing for those who cannot predict the future

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest CornBrazil’s corn production loss estimates are fluctuating between 200 to 400 million bushels. While this may sound high, it is actually helping to ease some large carryout concerns. Estimates are showing the U.S. will likely have the largest corn carryout in the last 10 years come August. This hasn’t happened since before the 2007 ethanol mandate, which coincides with the last time corn traded below $3 for an extended period.Adding to the mix, China continues to be a wildcard in terms of storage and carryout. Estimates of China’s corn storage levels range between 4 billion by the USDA to 9 billion bushels by some Chinese firms. Also, there continues to be rumors of quality issues with the stored corn. China may have to export some to blend off lower quality corn and replace with fresh inventory this fall. All these unknowns make it difficult to be bullish corn without a weather issue.BeansBeans continue to trade wildly as questions regarding production issues in Argentina circulate. Regardless, Argentina is sitting on the largest bean supply carryout in the world, so there isn’t a supply problem on paper. These production issues only represent about 20% of last year’s beans in storage in that country. The U.S. bean supply is still burdensome. We face the largest carryout in over a decade. Even with fewer acres than predicted a month ago, trend-line yields would create a situation that doesn’t warrant current prices.Funds have been on a buying spree, which may be what is supporting higher prices right now. This seems similar to last July when corn prices rallied quickly on fears that didn’t match the bigger picture. The $10 beans of today may be the $4.50 corn of last summer, where only 4 months later corn was trading at $3.50. Time will tell.Market ActionEarly this week I was concerned this recent bean rally may be short-lived (similar to last year’s corn rally), so I purchased 9 Nov puts for 10 cents on 40% of my anticipated 2017 production. These expire in late Oct, but I’m using them for the 2017 crop. This position provides unlimited upside potential (less 10 cents) and peace of mind that I won’t take less than $9 for some of my 2017 beans (again for 10 cents).While I hope I lose all the money I paid for these puts (because that means values stayed high), I wanted to be sure to put protections in place to reduce my farm operation’s risk.While farmers have a tendency to be optimists (i.e. prices will go higher), It’s important to remember things can always get worse. Right now the best outcome for prices would be a drought. Unfortunately, a drought usually hits southeast Nebraska (where my farm is) the hardest. So, for me it’s a catch-22 (price vs. yield). That’s why it’s important to put protections in place against all scenarios because no one can predict the future.Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at jon@superiorfeed.com.last_img read more

HBO’s New Documentary “Spielberg” Is a Must-See for Aspiring Directors

first_imgHBO’s “Spielberg” is more than a biography, it’s a mini masterclass detailing some of the most influential scenes in the history of American cinema.Cover image via HBO.Warning: contains spoilers!The opening scenes of HBO’s newest documentary, Spielberg, might leave you at a loss of words. You aren’t expecting the iconic, creeping sunrise of the entrance into the desert sequence from David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia. Even more, you don’t expect to hear Spielberg say that it was Lean’s masterpiece that “set the bar too high” for the sixteen-year-old filmmaker — and that he no longer wanted to make movies. Fortunately, he didn’t quit.In fact, Lawrence of Arabia was a catalyst for the young filmmaker, who would return each week to watch, analyze, and dissect the film.It was the first time seeing a movie [wherein] I realized there are themes that are not narrative story themes, but themes that are character themes … David Lean created a portraiture; surrounded the portrait with a mural of scope and epic action; but at the heart and core of Lawrence of Arabia is “Who am I?” —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s the question “Who am I” that defines the arc of Spielberg’s career and serves as a focal point in Susan Lacy‘s newest documentary on one of American cinema’s greatest filmmakers.Video via HBO.What Can Aspiring Filmmakers Learn from Spielberg?The documentary is epic in scope: a veritable 2.5 hours of Spielberg unpacking pivotal scenes from films like Munich, Schindler’s List, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as well as several of his lesser-known early films and flops.Aspiring directors, screenwriters, and cinematographers can glean strategies and approaches for creating memorable and relatable characters, crafting visual stories using the tools of the cinema, and how Spielberg thrived in uncertain situations.But perhaps more importantly, we see the man behind the movies. And for those of us who grew up watching those movies, it’s a dose of inspiration on par with rapture.On Visual StorytellingImage via British Film Institute.For me, directing is camera work. So I’m very on the frontline of that. I’ve got to set up the shot, I’ve got to block the actors, choreograph the movement of the scene, bring the camera into the choreography, figure out where the camera stops, where it moves, how far it moves … so I’ve always got my eye on the lens and that’s what I do. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s evident, even in his earliest films, that Spielberg understands the medium; he just gets “camera work,” as he calls it. Moreover, he doesn’t rely on dialogue, music, or any sound effects to tell a story. In other words, he uses the visual nature of moving pictures and images to propel the narrative forward.To demonstrate this, turn off your sound, and watch this nail-biting scene from Munich.Video via YouTube.Without hearing a single line of dialogue, or swell in music, we know the following about the scene:The scenario (or location).The players involved.The stakes.The ticking clock.All of the things necessary for creating suspense.“Geography is one of the most important things to me,” says Spielberg, “so the audience isn’t thrown into chaos trying to figure out the story that you’re telling.”In this scene from Munich, Spielberg made deliberate choices about subject, camera placement, and movement. Not a single shot appears unless it earned its way into the reel — and thus propels the story forward. As audience members, we get a clear picture of who and where the players are — and in this case what would happen if the clock runs out.This is an excellent scene for directors and cinematographers to study.On LightingImage via I Can’t Unsee That Movie.Everything we do in this medium is about light and shadow. It’s how the cinematographer lights the actors, lights the set. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergGood lighting makes your actors look pretty; great lighting tells a story. Schindler’s List is an excellent example of this. Spielberg, working alongside his long-time friend and go-to cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski, crafted lighting setups that emphasized the personality and emotions of the characters at different stages of the story.Let’s examine the approach taken to light Amon Goethe and Oskar Schindler, the story’s main antagonist and protagonist, respectively.Amon Goethe, played by Ralph Fiennes, is a Nazi officer who is inhumane and unapologetically cruel in his treatment of Jews. Although he’s an extremely nasty fellow, he is never conflicted by his actions. You’ll notice in the film that he’s always lit beautifully from the front, with very minimal shadows — his character (and conscience for that matter) was very clear.In contrast, Oskar Schindler was a conflicted individual. Beginning the story as a shrewd businessman and member of the Nazi party, he slowly begins to question the morality of his by-standing. During this time of inner conflict, his lighting is directional and from the side, creating shadows on his face (see picture above). However, as the film progresses, his inner conflict subsides, and he’s lit with more frontal, softer light, because he’s learning who he is.Find opportunities to use light as a storytelling device — not only a means to expose your shot.On Uncertainty and FailureImage via Whale Bone Mag.There are going to be moments, where you get to set, and you are not going to know what the hell you’re doing. It happens to all of us; you’ve got to guard that secret with your life. Let no one see when you’re unsure of yourself … or you lose the respect of everyone. —Steven Spielberg quoting his mentor Henry Hathaway, SpielbergFailure is not optional — at least not for filmmakers. What Spielberg teaches us is that, with a little creativity, failure can lead to great success. There’s no better film that demonstrates this than Jaws.You may have heard the stories of the shark breaking down and sinking … all of it’s true.The original script for Jaws featured the shark everywhere, and it called for the great white to be on-screen far more often than what we saw in the finished film. However, due to frequent breakdowns and mechanical failures, the shark was in repair for a majority of the 100+ day shoot.Therefore, Spielberg and his team had to get creative. How could they employ a device that suggested the shark was near without actually showing the shark on-screen?“The yellow barrels were a godsend,” says Spielberg, who used the props to indicate that the shark was near and ready to attack. Paired with John Williams‘s, unforgettable score, the audience knew exactly when the shark was about to strike … and we were terrified.“If the shark had been available visually,” says Williams, “it would’ve changed the whole psychology of the experience.”Image via The Soul of the Plot.Spielberg premiered on HBO on October 7.Looking for more filmmaking inspiration? Check out these articles.Navigating the Challenges of the One-Take Short FilmA Look Inside the Post-Production Process Behind “It”Interview: Director of Photography Jake Swantko of Netflix’s Icarus“Five Came Back” — Lessons from Famous Directors During WWIIThe Power of Shooting with a Shallow Depth of Fieldlast_img read more

The Power in Clarity of Purpose

first_imgLast weekend I was reviewing my projects and tasks when I recognized how many of the projects and tasks had nothing to do with my goals now. I accumulated this list over the course of the last seven or eight years, and many of the tasks and projects are no longer relevant, and some of them belonged to issues that had been resolved over time. A good portion of them were things I am no longer interested in nor are they worth the investment of my time. Many of them are ideas and projects  I would love to work on, but I haven’t touched since they went on the list.Even though it is critical to capture everything you want or need to do in a place where you can track those projects, ideas, and tasks, not everything can be substantial enough to command your time and energy. Deciding to release myself from the obligation I had to what was no longer relevant, I exported the entire list to a Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (so I could be sure to have a record to review later) and pushed the delete button. All the tasks and projects disappeared, along with the power they held over me.I started over, typing in the major projects and outcomes that I genuinely care about and that are going to move me closer to my goals and aligned with my purpose. I added in the commitments I owe to other people, of which there were far fewer than I imagined. The list I deleted had 298 tasks, and the new list consists of 50 in 22 projects. About 15 of those tasks are routine maintenance, the things that I do every week, including things like emptying all my electronic inboxes and physical inboxes, and reviewing my lists and transferring the stuff I need to do into my analog sales planner.My project list and task lists are now much smaller. All the items on those lists are vital to me now. I liked a lot of ideas and potential projects that are on the list I deleted, and someday a few of them may resurface. What I have now is not a greater sense of control, but also a greater sense of clarity. Which brings us to the big idea.We collect a lot of projects and tasks and commitments. We make many more commitments than we realize, some which seem small and innocuous when we make them. Over time, the list of things that we have said yes to, and the list of things that someone else commits us to, without us recognizing how overcommitted we are. Each new project or tasks commands a tiny sliver of our remaining time, and energy, and focus. Even though we aren’t always conscious of each of those commitments, they each take a little bit of our psychic RAM, and they contribute to an overall sense of overwhelm.Starting with a clean sheet of paper provides a sense of clarity. It’s a chance to decide what is important to you, and an opportunity to release yourself from things that are no longer who you are—and no longer part of what you are here to do. If any of what is here resonates with you, I invite you to give yourself the gift of a do-over and write down what you want, what projects are critical to you, and what you should be doing with your limited time and energy to make the contribution you are here to make.After I deleted my task list, I wrote this post that I published on the blog yesterday: Being Overcommitted is a Sign of Being Uncommitted to Your Goals.last_img read more

Magic Johnson Joins Jackie Robinson Foundation Board Of Directors

first_imgThe Jackie Robinson Foundation (JRF) chairman, Gregg Gonsalves, and president and CEO, Della Britton Baeza, announced today that Earvin “Magic” Johnson and Mark Roesler have been elected to the Foundation’s board of directors.Mr. Johnson and Mr. Roesler join a 33-member board overseeing the Foundation that perpetuates the legacy of Jackie Robinson through administering one of the nation’s premier college scholarship programs for minority students and, more recently, with the creation of the Jackie Robinson Museum.“Even bigger than the barriers that Jackie Robinson broke on the field of play is his legacy of working for equal opportunity for all people,” said Mr. Johnson. “I am proud to pay homage to Jackie Robinson by being part of JRF’s important mission of educating and inspiring young people.”In addition to his role as Chairman and CEO of Magic Johnson Enterprises, Mr. Johnson’s co-ownership of the Los Angeles Dodgers, one of Major League Baseball’s most renowned franchises, speaks to Jackie Robinson’s wish, verbalized in his last public appearance in 1972, that there would be diversity not only on the field but throughout the ranks of professional baseball organizations. Mr. Johnson was honored by the Jackie Robinson Foundation in 2002, receiving its prestigious “ROBIE Humanitarian Award.”“We are thrilled about attracting two very dynamic people to the Foundation board,” said Mr. Gonsalves. “They bring a wealth of talent and real commitment and add to our presence and resources on the west coast.” Ms. Britton added that “Magic, himself, broke barriers and stereotypes within professional sports. And he and Cookie Johnson have supported the Foundation for years as part of our extended family. We are thrilled that he has joined us in a more formal capacity.”Mark Roesler, Chairman and CEO of CMG Worldwide, a marketing and management firm for over 300 of the world’s most recognizable celebrities, brings tremendous legal, strategic planning and branding expertise to the JRF Board. A longtime JRF supporter, Mr. Roesler, who is lauded for his role in creating laws that protect the image and likeness of celebrities, represents the Estate of Jackie Robinson.“It is an honor to be part of preserving and protecting Jackie Robinson’s legacy,” said Mr. Roesler. “As a member of the Board, I look forward to expanding my involvement in ensuring that his name and heroic achievements continue to inspire all of us and many generations to come.”“Mr. Roesler has vast knowledge and experience in areas that will be vitally important as we move towards opening the Jackie Robinson Museum. He brings indispensable expertise to our efforts,” said Ms. Britton.last_img read more