Fivestar team goes 8-2 at Fivestar Fight League 18: Regenesis

first_imgThe full results from Fivestar Fight League 18: Regenesis are as follows:Carson Benedict (Kelowna) vs. Travis Lesschaeve (Grande Prairie)* Lesschaeve wins via Unanimous DecisionAshley Rouble (Fort St. John) vs. Kali Bachman (Kamloops)*Exhibition BoutTommy Malyar (Fort St. John) vs. Cody Banner (Grande Prairie)*Malyar wins via Unanimous DecisionNick Young (Fort St. John) vs. Mohammad Inaim (Vancouver)*Young wins via Unanimous DecisionRaymond Brown (Grande Prairie) vs. James Mott (Quesnel)*Mott wins via Split DecisionThomas Pope (Fort St. John) vs. Peter Student (Grande Prairie)*Pope wins via Unanimous DecisionTravis Lussier (Fort St. John) vs. Raphael Bergmann (Grande Prairie)*Exhibition BoutCameron Gibbs (Fort St. John) vs. Cory Antrim (Prince George)*Antrim wins via TKOBrayden Sims (Fort St. John) vs. Peyton Rakestraw (Grande Prairie)*Sims wins via TKONick Dragojevich (Fort St. John) vs. Austin Douglas (Fort St. John)*Douglas wins via Unanimous DecisionEddie Scarfo (Fort St. John) vs. Ethan Krystal (Grande Prairie)*Scarfo wins via Unanimous DecisionLandon Beasley (Fort St. John) vs. Joshua Ryan (Grande Prairie)*Beasley wins via Unanimous DecisionZach Bower (Grande Prairie) vs. Emmett Emblau (Quesnel)*Bower wins via Unanimous DecisionElvis Walter (Fort St. John) vs. Landon Swartz (Quesnel)*Kids Exhibition BoutKonnor Simograd (Fort St John) vs. Trace McGregor (Quesnel)*Kids Exhibition Bout FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – The ballroom at the Pomeroy Hotel and Conference Centre was jammed to the rafters on Good Friday for the first-ever sanctioned boxing event in Fort St. John’s history.Fivestar Fight League 18: Regenesis represented a turning point for Fivestar owner Justin Donally, who hosted the Energetic City’s first-ever mixed martial arts event several years ago.32 boxers from across the Peace Region and further beyond took to the ring last Friday. Among the athletes in competition were boxers as young as eight, though Donally explained that those are merely exhibition matches. “There’s no winner or loser until they’re 11 or 12 years old, then they’re scored.” Boxers from the Fivestar’s Boxing Academy’s athletes went 8-and-2 on the night, though one of those matches featured two of the gym’s boxers.- Advertisement -17 year-old Nick Young, who has emerged as one of the gym’s promising young boxers, continued his winning streak on Friday. Fighting against the Surrey School of Boxing’s Mohammad Inaim, Young dominated his opponent, winning via unanimous decision. With the win, Young improved his record to 8-0, and was also given the honour of Fighter of the Night. Young and Inaim’s bout was also named Fight of the Night. For Young, the fight was a nice change after facing left-handed boxers in his last two battles. “I was glad to fight an orthodox fighter again, it was nice to have that change,” said Young. “It was a fun fight, tough. He had a weird style, he would come out swinging and I would just duck under, and he would grab on a lot.”Ashley Rouble, also 17, fought against her Team B.C. teammate Kali Gawley from Kamloops in an Exhibition bout ahead of the pair’s appearance at the 2017 Canadian Boxing Championships in Quebec City next week. For Rouble, the fight was a great way to prepare for her upcoming appearance at Nationals. “Mine was really fun. It was kind-of the opposite of Nick, for me there was no pressure, just get in there and put on a show,” said Rouble. “She’s my teammate so we took care of each other in there, but we still went full speed.”Donally says that the fights were an excellent showcase for the city as a venue for future BC Boxing events. Donally says that he has put in a bid to host BC Golden Gloves in 2018, and that tlast weekend’s event wowed the judges.Advertisementlast_img read more

Alan Pardew admits he’s worried after Newcastle’s latest loss

first_imgNewcastle manager Alan Pardew admitted his growing concern after his team’s poor recent run continued with a 2-1 defeat against Fulham.The Magpies, so impressive last season, have lost five of their last six league matches and their defensive shortcomings were exposed again at Craven Cottage.“I’m worried in as much as we’re not picking up points,” said Pardew.“Performances have been much improved – our attacking has more fluency about it – but it’s a worry that we don’t have enough points on the board.“We’ve got a tough run of games. We’ve put ourselves under pressure by losing two home games against Swansea and West Ham – that hurt us.”Pardew’s side have now gone seven months without an away win.“It’s difficult to put our finger on it,” he added.“Some performances have been good. We need to get back the resilience we showed last year away from home.”See also:Rodallega’s winner gives Fulham victoryPoor Magpies defending angers 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Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Many Huffington Post Readers Hate Site’s New Facebook-Powered Recommendation Engine

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Recommendation Engines#web Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting marshall kirkpatrickcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… The giant online publisher and aggregator Huffington Post began experimenting with a new content recommendation engine today, powered by Facebook and built by AdaptiveSemantics, the startup the company acquired last June. The feature uses the “Liked” Pages and shared articles of logged-in Facebook users who visit the Post to recommend recent content from across its wide swath of articles. It looks like a good and relatively simple feature. Surprisingly, HuffPo readers responding in comments on the announcement absolutely hate it!The feature sounds simple, but is a great example of the power of Facebook: the social network is not just a tool for publishers to push content onto, to increase distribution and pageviews, Facebook Connect is also a form of data portability that allows 3rd party websites to offer personalized content to their visitors. Many sites have exposed content that a Facebook user’s friends have shared, but this leveraging of the structured individual interest data is far less common.Could objections to using this data be rooted in the ongoing lack of clarity around Facebook’s privacy settings? Or did the company just shoot itself in the foot so badly 12 months ago when it made drastic privacy policy changes that people still distrust it today?The Down Side Reader comments range from confusion about the feature to distrust of anything associated with Facebook (“I don’t have one of those,” several people have said) to distrust of recommendations to concern about self-reenforcing political perspectives. “Great,” one frustrated comment read, “put your readers to work for you, is it not enough that we have to deal with your advertisements.” Unbelievable!Another: “If it involves Facebook, you can count me out. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Passive House Training, One Year Later

first_img RELATED ARTICLES So You Want to Be a Passivhaus Consultant?Makin’ WUFIQ&A: Passive House Consultant trainingBlog Review: Vermont Architect Robert Swinburne I have been asked about my Passive House Consultant training by other architects enough times that I thought I’d write up a quick synopsis, one year later.For me, the training was very useful for several reasons, not the least of which was the networking aspect. It is a small community with some really great conversation happening and it is fun to be a part of that.There is a lot of controversy as well, especially here on GBA. Such as: Where does the law of diminishing returns kick in when it comes to insulating? And how to handle latent loads (excess moisture)? Plus there’s the whole U.S. vs. the rest of the world thing, which I won’t go into as I find it rather annoying, or at least boring. More confidence and added authorityMuch of my own work had been trending in the Passivhaus direction anyway, so it was good to undergo the intensive training. It helped me make decisions with much more confidence and with the authority that comes with Passivhaus credentials. As an architect who was never very (ahem) enthusiastic about the numbers and physics of things (and more into the airy-fairy poetic nature and scholarly aspect of architecture), it was also helpful in terms of training my weaknesses.I call myself a Passivhaus designer rather than a consultant, in part because If I were to attempt a full-on certified Passivhaus, I would want to hire someone more experienced who does this on a daily basis to do the actual numbers part while I looked over their shoulder through the process — at least for the first few times. ARTICLES BY ROBERT SWINBURNE Most ‘Houses That Breathe’ Aren’t Very Comfortable A simple HVAC system is bestMy approach to Passivhaus is similar to my approach to structural engineering. I try not to design anything too complicated to engineer myself. Similarly, I prefer not to design anything that would require a complicated heating and ventilating system. It does get more complicated in renovation/addition work though, for sure. My approach to structural engineering has always been very intuitive and very related to my own building experience and knowledge of materials, assemblies, and connections.My structural engineering professor once told me that the intuition part is vital and more than half the battle. First you intuit the solution, and then you apply numbers and formulas to check yourself. The Passivhaus training augmented my intuition and gave me more confidence to apply the numbers as well as a perspective on when, where, and why.Plus it was really good for marketing.center_img Passivhaus is really all about quality, and even, as I’m finding out, represents a necessary rethinking of how to get something built. A much more collaborative approach is necessary than often happens when building even high-end projects. The process gets much less linear.I also like the idea that the Passivhaus approach is a valid part of the conversation, and not just about achieving certification and getting the plaque to hang beside the front door. I see projects being showcased that utilized the approach in a “value engineering” manner to get the most bang for the buck for projects that simply don’t have the budget to go all the way and attain certification. And I like the general consensus that that is okay. It’s not just about certificationPassivhaus represents state-of-the-art science on how to build good buildings with an overriding emphasis on simplicity and quality. Robert Swinburne is a part-time architect and full-time homemaker living on 49 acres with his wife and two young children in Halifax, Vermont. He was a carpenter for several years after architecture school and is now a licensed architect and passive house designer with over 100 completed projects in the Northeast. Bob maintains a blog (primarily for therapeutic reasons) under the moniker “Vermont Architect.”last_img read more

HBO’s New Documentary “Spielberg” Is a Must-See for Aspiring Directors

first_imgHBO’s “Spielberg” is more than a biography, it’s a mini masterclass detailing some of the most influential scenes in the history of American cinema.Cover image via HBO.Warning: contains spoilers!The opening scenes of HBO’s newest documentary, Spielberg, might leave you at a loss of words. You aren’t expecting the iconic, creeping sunrise of the entrance into the desert sequence from David Lean’s Lawrence of Arabia. Even more, you don’t expect to hear Spielberg say that it was Lean’s masterpiece that “set the bar too high” for the sixteen-year-old filmmaker — and that he no longer wanted to make movies. Fortunately, he didn’t quit.In fact, Lawrence of Arabia was a catalyst for the young filmmaker, who would return each week to watch, analyze, and dissect the film.It was the first time seeing a movie [wherein] I realized there are themes that are not narrative story themes, but themes that are character themes … David Lean created a portraiture; surrounded the portrait with a mural of scope and epic action; but at the heart and core of Lawrence of Arabia is “Who am I?” —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s the question “Who am I” that defines the arc of Spielberg’s career and serves as a focal point in Susan Lacy‘s newest documentary on one of American cinema’s greatest filmmakers.Video via HBO.What Can Aspiring Filmmakers Learn from Spielberg?The documentary is epic in scope: a veritable 2.5 hours of Spielberg unpacking pivotal scenes from films like Munich, Schindler’s List, Close Encounters of the Third Kind, as well as several of his lesser-known early films and flops.Aspiring directors, screenwriters, and cinematographers can glean strategies and approaches for creating memorable and relatable characters, crafting visual stories using the tools of the cinema, and how Spielberg thrived in uncertain situations.But perhaps more importantly, we see the man behind the movies. And for those of us who grew up watching those movies, it’s a dose of inspiration on par with rapture.On Visual StorytellingImage via British Film Institute.For me, directing is camera work. So I’m very on the frontline of that. I’ve got to set up the shot, I’ve got to block the actors, choreograph the movement of the scene, bring the camera into the choreography, figure out where the camera stops, where it moves, how far it moves … so I’ve always got my eye on the lens and that’s what I do. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergIt’s evident, even in his earliest films, that Spielberg understands the medium; he just gets “camera work,” as he calls it. Moreover, he doesn’t rely on dialogue, music, or any sound effects to tell a story. In other words, he uses the visual nature of moving pictures and images to propel the narrative forward.To demonstrate this, turn off your sound, and watch this nail-biting scene from Munich.Video via YouTube.Without hearing a single line of dialogue, or swell in music, we know the following about the scene:The scenario (or location).The players involved.The stakes.The ticking clock.All of the things necessary for creating suspense.“Geography is one of the most important things to me,” says Spielberg, “so the audience isn’t thrown into chaos trying to figure out the story that you’re telling.”In this scene from Munich, Spielberg made deliberate choices about subject, camera placement, and movement. Not a single shot appears unless it earned its way into the reel — and thus propels the story forward. As audience members, we get a clear picture of who and where the players are — and in this case what would happen if the clock runs out.This is an excellent scene for directors and cinematographers to study.On LightingImage via I Can’t Unsee That Movie.Everything we do in this medium is about light and shadow. It’s how the cinematographer lights the actors, lights the set. —Steven Spielberg, SpielbergGood lighting makes your actors look pretty; great lighting tells a story. Schindler’s List is an excellent example of this. Spielberg, working alongside his long-time friend and go-to cinematographer, Janusz Kaminski, crafted lighting setups that emphasized the personality and emotions of the characters at different stages of the story.Let’s examine the approach taken to light Amon Goethe and Oskar Schindler, the story’s main antagonist and protagonist, respectively.Amon Goethe, played by Ralph Fiennes, is a Nazi officer who is inhumane and unapologetically cruel in his treatment of Jews. Although he’s an extremely nasty fellow, he is never conflicted by his actions. You’ll notice in the film that he’s always lit beautifully from the front, with very minimal shadows — his character (and conscience for that matter) was very clear.In contrast, Oskar Schindler was a conflicted individual. Beginning the story as a shrewd businessman and member of the Nazi party, he slowly begins to question the morality of his by-standing. During this time of inner conflict, his lighting is directional and from the side, creating shadows on his face (see picture above). However, as the film progresses, his inner conflict subsides, and he’s lit with more frontal, softer light, because he’s learning who he is.Find opportunities to use light as a storytelling device — not only a means to expose your shot.On Uncertainty and FailureImage via Whale Bone Mag.There are going to be moments, where you get to set, and you are not going to know what the hell you’re doing. It happens to all of us; you’ve got to guard that secret with your life. Let no one see when you’re unsure of yourself … or you lose the respect of everyone. —Steven Spielberg quoting his mentor Henry Hathaway, SpielbergFailure is not optional — at least not for filmmakers. What Spielberg teaches us is that, with a little creativity, failure can lead to great success. There’s no better film that demonstrates this than Jaws.You may have heard the stories of the shark breaking down and sinking … all of it’s true.The original script for Jaws featured the shark everywhere, and it called for the great white to be on-screen far more often than what we saw in the finished film. However, due to frequent breakdowns and mechanical failures, the shark was in repair for a majority of the 100+ day shoot.Therefore, Spielberg and his team had to get creative. How could they employ a device that suggested the shark was near without actually showing the shark on-screen?“The yellow barrels were a godsend,” says Spielberg, who used the props to indicate that the shark was near and ready to attack. Paired with John Williams‘s, unforgettable score, the audience knew exactly when the shark was about to strike … and we were terrified.“If the shark had been available visually,” says Williams, “it would’ve changed the whole psychology of the experience.”Image via The Soul of the Plot.Spielberg premiered on HBO on October 7.Looking for more filmmaking inspiration? Check out these articles.Navigating the Challenges of the One-Take Short FilmA Look Inside the Post-Production Process Behind “It”Interview: Director of Photography Jake Swantko of Netflix’s Icarus“Five Came Back” — Lessons from Famous Directors During WWIIThe Power of Shooting with a Shallow Depth of Fieldlast_img read more

PCB to oppose end to ICC president rotation policy

first_imgPakistan has rejected reforms which could see the country lose the right to have one of its nationals at the head of cricket’s governing body, an official said on Tuesday.ICC chief Sharad Pawar with PCB chairman Ijaz Butt.A plan to scrap the rotation policy for appointing presidents and vice- presidents of the International Cricket Council is likely to be tabled at its board meeting in Hong Kong later this month.”Under the current rotational system, Pakistan and Bangladesh have to put up the next candidates for president and vice-president and we don’t agree with the proposal of change and we have shown our reservations to the ICC,” Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB) chief operating officer Subhan Ahmed told reporters.Ahmed said Pakistan and Bangladesh had the right to nominate their candidates.”We are in touch with the ICC over the matter and will decide the future course of action soon,” said Ahmed.The post of ICC president was first created in 1997 when India’s Jagmohan Dalmiya took the top job. He was followed by Australian representative Malcolm Gray, followed by Ehsan Mani of Pakistan and Percy Sonn from South Africa.India’s Sharad Pawar is the current president and will be succeeded by Australia-New Zealand nominee Alan Isaac next year.Pakistan and Bangladesh will nominate their candidates after Isaac completes his term in 2014.It was unclear what new system for picking ICC presidents would replace rotational appointment.Pakistan has also opposed another suggested amendment in the ICC’s constitution allowing the council to suspend members in cases of government interference in the running of national cricket boards.advertisementThe role of PCB chairman is widely criticised for being a political appointment by the ruling administration.”But we challenged them on this issue and sent a legal notice in April. Now we are in talks with them to explain our position,” Ahmed said.Ahmed pointed out that the PCB had taken the stance that every member country had its own particular environment and set-up that it functioned under.- With Agency inputslast_img read more

UNP changes the constitution to give Sri Lanka an executive Presidency

first_imgWhen the United National Party (UNP) entered the final year of its Parliamentary term on July 23, even its most sanguine supporters conceded that the first five years had taken a heavy toll of its once heady popularity. In this fiercely politicised electorate, psephology is second cousin to astrology and,When the United National Party (UNP) entered the final year of its Parliamentary term on July 23, even its most sanguine supporters conceded that the first five years had taken a heavy toll of its once heady popularity. In this fiercely politicised electorate, psephology is second cousin to astrology and every man is his own opinion poller and pundit. Election forecasting is already an exciting and inexpensive national sport.If the electoral mood is distinctly ‘oppositional’, the opposition leadership is manifestly disoriented and dispirited. Not wholly of their own doing, this is the cumulative result of many finely calculated moves by President J.R. Jayawardene in his determined bid to break the familiar pattern of Sri Lanka politics, the in-out pendulum swing between the two main contenders, and the discontinuity in policy, chiefly economic policy.Using its four-fifths majority, the UNP changed the constitution to give the island an executive Presidency, introduced proportional representation (PR) with an unusually high cut-off point (12.5 per cent), and led an unprecedented frontal attack on the Opposition by depriving its formidable rival Mrs Bandaranaike of her civic rights for seven years. However, popular predictions hold that only the evident advantages of the PR system in conjunction with a fragmented Opposition can possibly give the UNP the largest number of seats in the next 196-member Parliament. In the circumstances, even a simple majority is considered doubtful.Strong Executive: Jayawardene’s proclaimed aim was a strong, stable executive, able to take “the hard unpopular decisions” necessary to escape the welfare system, an essential linchpin of Sri Lanka’s uniquely resilient democracy. An uncertain blessing, the “open economy” has the full backing of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the Sri Lanka Aid Group. The object of the exercise, the Opposition says, was merely the perpetuation of the party and the President in power.advertisement On its own, the right wing UNP has the strongest support base – an almost irreducible third of the national electorate. Only a Centre-Left alliance between the middle-of-the-road Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) and the traditional Left has been able, in recent years, to defeat the UNP. Now that alliance is in tatters.Yet the ruling party leadership senses a sullen, probably hostile electorate which has a notorious legacy of “throwing the rascals out” even when it has not been too enamoured of the alternative. The mass mood is a product of larger social and economic discontent. In his anniversary address and first formal TV appearance, President Jayawardene said that 50 per cent of Sri Lankans still earn only Rs 300 a month. The shops are full but the old system of subsidised essentials, despite the vexations of ration cards and queues at cooperatives, continues.Restricted Benefit: So far the benefits of the UNP’S faith in the ‘open economy’ and “the trickle down” theory have been reaped largely by the business community and the old propertied and privileged strata.Javawardene (left) and Bandaranaike: Picking up the piecesThe real rewards, the UNP argues, of the major projects (the Mahaveli diversion, the huge construction programme, the trade zones) will spread to the lower income groups in a few years. In an effort at ensuring a second term to reap the benefit of this delayed effect, the new August 3 constitutional amendment will enable Jayawardene to hold a Presidential poll even before the Parliamentary elections which are due by July next. Evidently he favours his own chances in single combat. If he wins, his party’s chances will probably improve. The move has made the Opposition disarray even more public. First to enter the list of contenders was Maitripala Senanayake, MP, long-time deputy of Mrs Bandaranaike, who now leads a rival faction which he claims is the “legitimate SLEP” Then came Dr Colvin R. de Silva, the leader of the socialist (formerly Trotskyist) LSSP (Lanka Sama Samaja Party).Next, with the Tamil United Liberation Front (TULF) not contesting the Presidency, was the very much smaller Tamil Congress (TC) which nominated its leader G.G. Ponnambalam Jr, a token Tamil contender. All eyes, however, were on Mrs Bandaranaike’s SLFP. The party’s central committee met on August 6 and Hector Kobbekaduwe, an ex-minister, was heavily tipped as the SLFP choice. He is backed by a radical, pro-China group led by Mrs Bandaranaike’s younger daughter, Chandrika Kumaratunge. However, Mrs Bandaranaike, sensitive to charges of favouritism, would be reluctant to nominate Kobbekaduwe who is her cousin.Consensus Candidate: Mrs Bandaranaike, the communists, the socialists and smaller left parties are in search of a “common candidate” to take on Jayawardene. Dr Colvin R. de Silva, a classmate of Jayawardene and a brilliant lawyer, is widely favoured.advertisementHe has two disqualifications: his Marxist politics and his caste. With the majority Sinhala-Buddhist vote quite evenly divided between the traditional rivals, the support of the minorities (Tamil, Christians, Muslims and Indian plantation labour) is a key factor. In the calculus of Presidential contests, such “block votes” could be vital. Since last year’s racial troubles, Jayawardene has taken a firm line of “racial-religious harmony”. Though he has paid great personal attention to Buddhist affairs, the UNP’S apparent solicitude for the minorities has aroused Sinhala-Buddhist chauvinism. A Colombo meeting of a new Sinhala-Buddhist organisation, launched by a group of monks and lay leaders, was attacked by a gang of intruders whom Opposition MP’S branded as pro-UNP goons. One of those injured was Professor Ediriweera Saratchandra, well-known playwright and former ambassador to Paris. He has been writing pamphlets and making speeches denouncing the new Singapore-style consumerism as an attack on the Buddhist value system. He appeared on Mrs Bandaranaike’s platform last month.Communal Violence: The anniversary week ended on an inauspicious note. Racial disturbances in Galle, the southern province capital, forced the Government to declare an Emergency, introduce censorship and impose a curfew in the area. Galle has a strong concentration of Muslims, traditionally a trading community monopolising the prosperous gem business. A quarrel over a parrot, a fight between a Muslim landlord and a Sinhalese tenant, and a Sinhalese schoolboy mistaken for a Muslim and assaulted, formed the familiar chain reactions of communal violence. There were two deaths, and several cases of arson. While the situation is now calm, the Government is investigating the possible involvement of “opposition elements”.last_img read more

Imran Khan asks Pakistanis living abroad to help highlight Kashmir issue

first_imgIslamabad: Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan has asked his party’s workers and followers living abroad to help highlight the Kashmir issue internationally.The ruling Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf decided to highlight the Kashmir issue at all the world forums.Tensions between India and Pakistan spiked after New Delhi abrogated provisions of Article 370 of the Constitution to withdraw Jammu and Kashmir’s special status and bifurcated it into two Union Territories. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USIndia has categorically told the international community that the scrapping of Article 370 of the Constitution to revoke the special status of Jammu and Kashmir was an internal matter and also advised Pakistan to accept the reality. During a meeting with his party’s Overseas Secretary Abdullah Riar on Wednesday, the prime minister directed the party leaders and workers to hold protest in New York against Prime Minister Narendra Modi during the UN General Assembly session next month.last_img read more