DONEGAL CAN TALK TO JOE TOMORROW!

first_imgThe people of Donegal can talk to Joe tomorrow!Now only that but they can also see him and a host of other well-knwon personalities.RTE broadcaster Joe Duffy will be doing Liveline Funny Friday from the Lough Eske Castle Hotel, outside Donegal Town tomorrow. The show will be live on air from 1.45…the audience can arrive from around midday.All the usual Funny Friday crew will be there June Rodgers, Brush Shiels, Sil Fox, Doc Savage, Conal Gallen, Packie O’Callaghan etc….and of course Joe Duffy.Everyone is invited along. So get ahead – talk to Joe!DONEGAL CAN TALK TO JOE TOMORROW! was last modified: February 27th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Joe DuffyLivelinelast_img read more

Molecular Machines Show Same Design Principles as Big Machines

first_imgLife needs molecular machines before natural selection can even be considered as a possible Darwinian explanation for them.The discovery that living cells operate real machines and motors has to rank as one of the greatest discoveries of the late 20th century. It continues to fascinate engineers who want to imitate what cells do. Here are recent news articles that discuss the subject, and one that tries to “evolutionize” them.Molecular rotary motors: Unidirectional motion around double bonds (PNAS). Nano-engineers are taking baby steps toward imitating what cells do. Notice how Roke, Wezenberg and Feringa speak of the “design principles” of artificial rotary motors at the nanoscopic scale:The field of synthetic molecular machines has quickly evolved in recent years, growing from a fundamental curiosity to a highly active field of chemistry. Many different applications are being explored in areas such as catalysis, self-assembled and nanostructured materials, and molecular electronics. Rotary molecular motors hold great promise for achieving dynamic control of molecular functions as well as for powering nanoscale devices. However, for these motors to reach their full potential, many challenges still need to be addressed. In this paper we focus on the design principles of rotary motors featuring a double-bond axle and discuss the major challenges that are ahead of us.Having mentioned “design principles” for scientific work, they now look to the rotary engines in living cells.Bacterial flagellum (Illustra Media)Control of motion at the molecular scale has intrigued chemists for a very long time. The quest for overcoming random thermal (Brownian) motion has culminated in the emergence of synthetic molecular machines, including motors, muscles, shuttles, elevators, walkers, pumps, and assemblers. By taking inspiration from the fascinating dynamic and motor functions observed in biological systems (e.g., ATPase and bacterial flagella), the field of synthetic molecular machines has evolved rapidly in recent years.There’s a use of the word “evolved” in a clear intelligent-design context. Nano-engineers are gradually improving their little machines by design, not by natural selection. Having mentioned the two famous rotary motors (see animations of ATP Synthase and the bacterial flagellum), they focus for the rest of the paper on human-engineered motors. But the comparison is clear: if humans cannot approach the efficiency and functionality of the living motors using their own “design principles,” how could anyone claim that there are no design principles in the living motors?Researchers propose a model for how the parts of a bacterial flagellum are assembled (Science Daily). In Illustra’s classic film Unlocking the Mystery of Life, Dr Scott Minnich explains why the assembly of the bacterial flagellum is even more irreducibly complex than the flagellum itself. Now in 2018, scientists are bringing the assembly process into sharper focus. Just like Minnich says in the film, researchers in Japan describe the assembly as a complex, orchestrated process with feedback:Many bacteria are equipped with a flagellum, a helical propeller that allows bacteria to travel. The flagellum is assembled in a highly organized manner involving the stepwise addition of each of its internal parts. However, there are many open questions as to how this orderly construction is achieved. In a study published in Science Advances, a Japanese research team centered at Osaka University has uncovered new molecular details and provided a model explaining how stepwise flagellar assembly occurs….“Flagellar assembly is a complex process involving more than 70 genes,” lead author Naoya Terahara explains. “First, the basal motor is assembled, followed by the hook, and finally the helical filament. Each structure is built by sending a unique set of proteins to the site of assembly. The cell can somehow sense when each structure is complete, triggering a switch to export the next series of proteins. We wanted to develop a more detailed picture of how this switching occurs.”The open-access paper in Science Advances gives the details of their work. They’re only trying to figure out how one of the rings in the membrane shuttles proteins out to the growing tip, but statements about “assembly” dominate the paper, with no mention of evolution.New details of molecular machinery that builds plant cell wall components (Phys.org). For an example of an unfamiliar molecular machine, read this article about two researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory who are figuring out “the enzyme ‘machinery’ that makes building blocks for lignin, a plant cell wall component.” Then listen to a podcast on ID the Future by Douglas Axe about how lignin challenges Darwinian evolution (link at Evolution News).Molecular machines and the place of physics in the biology curriculum (Mike Klymkowsky, Public Library of Science, via Phys.org). In this PLoS blog post, Mike Klymkowsky tells how he read a paper that reminded him of an earlier conviction that learning about the physics behind molecular machines is important for biologists:On reading the paper, I found myself returning to my original belief, yes, understanding physics is critical to developing a molecular-level understanding of how biological systems work, BUT it was just not the physics normally inflicted upon (required of) students. Certainly this was no new idea. Bruce Alberts [former editor of Science] had written on this topic a number of times, most dramatically in his 1989 paper “The cell as a collection of molecular machines“.And yet at the end of his article, Klymkowsky espouses mindless materialism. Not only does he attribute molecular machines to blind evolution, he attributes everything to it. First, he sets up a false dichotomy between physicalism and mysticism, assuming that this will dispense with all design arguments or non-materialistic views of biology. Then he shows a very simplistic view of Darwinian evolution, assuming that genetic reorganization conjures up creative powers. Then he resorts to mysticism again. Let’s give him enough time to saw through the branch he’s sitting on:NASA has been promoting materialism for many years as the only “scientific” view.The value of introducing students to the idea of molecular machines is that it can be used to demystify how biological systems work, how such machines carry out specific functions, whether moving the cell or recognizing and repairing damaged DNA. If physics matters in biological curriculum, it matters for this reason – it establishes the core premise of biology that organisms are not driven by “vital” forces, but by prosaic physiochemical ones. At the same time, the molecular mechanisms behind evolution, such as mutation, gene duplication, and genomic reorganization, provide the means by which new structures emerge from pre-existing ones, yet many is the molecular biology degree program that does not include an introduction to evolutionary mechanisms in its required course sequence – imagine that, requiring physics but not evolution?One final point regarding requiring students to take a biologically relevant physics course early in their degree program is that it can be used to reinforce what I think is a critical and often misunderstood point. While biological systems rely on molecular machines, we (and by we I mean all organisms) are NOT machines, no matter what physicists might postulate – see We Are All Machines That Think. We are something different and distinct. Our behaviors and our feelings, whether ultimately understandable or not, emerge from the interaction of genetically encoded, stochastically driven non-equilibrium systems, modified through evolutionary, environmental, social, and a range of unpredictable events occurring in an uninterrupted, and basically undirected fashion for ~3.5 billion years. While we are constrained, we are more, in some weird and probably ultimately incomprehensible way.For reasons why materialism is unscientific, see this Illustra film.Nowhere is the blindness of fallen man more evident than when they can stare at the most elegant designs in the universe, including their own brains, and then attribute them to “undirected” forces, which amount to chance—the Stuff Happens Law. What can we say, other than to keep pointing everyone to Romans 1:20-22.(Visited 661 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

‘La vita’ looks ‘bella’ for Debora Patta

first_imgFrom left to right, IWW award winnersFerdinando Pezzoli, Lara Mazzoni, DeboraPatta, Tiziana Grassi, Marco Folegani,and Elena Maria Teresa Calligaro.(Image: IWW) MEDIA CONTACTS • Michelle KirbyE.tv Head of Marketing+27 11 537 9300RELATED ARTICLES• Media awards for SA women• Rhodes hosts world journalism meet• The media and open justice• Jacob Zuma on press freedom• Turning up the media volumeFiona McRae“La vita”, it would appear, is pretty “bella” right now for South African television journalist and media personality Debora Patta.Not only did the Zimbabwe-born anchor and executive producer of e.tv’s hard-hitting investigative programme 3rd Degree add yet another award to her collection last month, but she seems to be revelling in a career decision of a year ago to free up some time so as to be able to concentrate more fully on her “two real passions”: journalism and her family. Happily married to her second husband, Patta is the mother of two young daughters.And it would seem that, like many women her age, the 40-something Patta is discovering the liberation and confidence that the years can bring.“The best thing about this age is no longer caring what other people think of you,” she is quoted as saying in a recent edition of a fashion chain’s club magazine. “I’ve learnt not to be so hung up on people who don’t like you.”The fact that the apparently always self-assured and assertive Patta has ever lacked confidence might well come as a surprise to 3rd Degree viewers who have seen her courageously and tenaciously hold those in positions of power and responsibility to account.Famous for her tough, no-nonsense approach she has had heads of state, politicians, business leaders and many others in the hot seat on the show in the decade that it has been in existence – but has also told the stories of the ordinary person in the street with compassion.Patta has featured high-profile figures such as African National Congress Youth League president Julius Malema, the late political leader Eugene Terre’Blanche who, she says, is the only person to have walked out of an interview, businessman Cyril Ramaphosa, President Jacob Zuma, axed Ekurhuleni police chief Robert McBride, and former president Thabo Mbeki.Winning formula Patta’s unrelenting pursuit of not only answers but also excellence in a journalism career spanning two decades has garnered her respect and recognition stretching beyond the country’s borders. Already the winner of multiple accolades, including a 2010 South Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government category award and the 2009 Vodacom Women in the Media award, Patta was honoured by the Italian Women in the World (IWW) association last month when she received a Tricolor Globe Award at a ceremony held in Bologna, Italy.The IWW is a global networking association. Its awards recognise the achievements of men and women of Italian origins, or of Italians working abroad or in Italy for other countries, who have attained outstanding career success within “creative and innovative global industries” such as communication and events; art and design; performing arts; alternative energies and recyclable products; information and communication technologies; science, research, technology and engineering; and tourism.Six achievers from Asia, Africa, South America and Europe were recognised in this year’s awards. Patta was honoured for her “achievements, excellence and contribution to society in the communications field in Africa”.The main goal of the award, according to IWW founder and president Patrizia Angelini, “is to promote the important role of compatriots and other Italians who work abroad, through the spreading of personal success stories and highlighting the cultural and entrepreneurial effort.”Angelini, a television journalist for Italian broadcasting corporation RAI International, founded the association in 2007 after her work brought her into contact with the larger Italian community around the world and she conceived the idea of creating a network to facilitate their international communication.The awards project, which has the support of the Italian government, is active in promoting the “excellence, enterprise and beauty” of Italy and its culture and the Made in Italy brand internationally. This is done through on-line and television information and through events including seminars, international awards and intercultural exchanges.“It is a great honour to be recognised by my country of origin,” said Patta, who owes her Italian heritage to her Calabrian father. “I am extremely proud of my Italian roots, so this is very exciting.”Patta has previously said that while South Africa is where her heart is, Italy is indeed her second home. And like most good Italians, she loves cooking “fabulous Italian food” and relaxing with family, friends and a glass of fine wine.Team effortAlways mindful of the team effort required for the success of the current affairs show that draws close to 2-million viewers, she said: “It is also a great tribute to 3rd Degree and e.tv as they are regarded as making a significant contribution in Africa.”E.tv’s channel head Monde Twala paid tribute to Patta, saying that “Debora is a committed journalist and executive producer who continually aims to better and uplift society by exposing the truth and keeping the public informed. 3rd Degree has been successful for the past 10 years and e.tv congratulates Debora for her ongoing investigative success.”With a career of more than 20 years spanning radio, television and writing – she has co-authored two non-fiction books – Patta is one of the most prominent and respected journalists in South Africa, having reported fearlessly on virtually every major story in the country during that time. She became well known for her extensive coverage of Nelson Mandela from his release from prison to his election as South Africa’s first black head of state – the warm relationship they developed led to her being dubbed his favourite reporter.During her time with e.tv since its inception in 1998 Patta has trained, developed and mentored many budding young television journalists and news anchors. She also led the team that launched South Africa’s first 24-hour news service.Known for her no-holds-barred interviewing and for being unafraid to ask the tough questions, Patta maintains that she has never felt her achievements were limited because she is a woman. Indeed, in receiving the Vodacom Women in the Media award last year she had a strong message for young women: “Don’t just knock on the door, bash it down!”But she does acknowledge the sometimes harsh truth that “women are so often seen as aggressive while men doing the same thing are regarded as tough, assertive, uncompromising”.While Patta too has come under fire from those who feel her style of interviewing is too aggressive and not diplomatic enough, there is no doubt that she has brought many sinister cases to light, which might otherwise have continued to harm society.She admits that finding the balance between career and family can be a tough challenge – and one she handles better at some times than at others. She finds release from the pressures of her “adrenaline-all-the-way” job through “strong coping mechanisms, trying to stay healthy and a supportive family”. A year ago she resigned from the demanding position as editor-in-chief of eNews to be able to concentrate more fully on 3rd Degree and her two real loves, journalism and her family.“You can’t change the world, but you can make a difference to someone,” Patta has said. Over the years, the woman described as having “a unique front row in South Africa’s history” has done that many times over.last_img read more

Elections 2014: guide to voting, counting and objecting

first_imgDownload the app The IEC has designed an app especially for voters which allows you to check your registration details, find your voting station – and keep up to date via social media. 5 May 2014 South Africa goes to the polls on Wednesday – and many in the country who are too young to remember apartheid will be voting for the first time. According to the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), more young South Africans have registered to vote in this election than ever before – with 49.57% of registered voters under 40 years old. The biggest segment of voters is those aged 30 to 39 (6.18-million), followed by 20- to 29-year-olds (5.7-million), the IEC says. As this new generation of voters prepare to join millions of their fellow South Africans at the polls on Wednesday, we answer a few last-minute questions.Are you ready? If you are a South African citizen 18 years or older and have registered to vote, remember:Voting stations are open from 7am to 9pm on Wednesday.You must vote where you registered. SMS your ID number to 32810 to confirm your correct voting station. SMSs cost R1. Or you can check your registration details on the IEC’s website.Take along your green bar-coded South African ID book, or a smart ID card, or your temporary identity certificate. Read more: All the election info, results via mobile appFind out where to download the IEC’s voters app Read more: New ballot paper for visually impaired voters The ballot papers An IEC official will give you two ballot papers that will be stamped on the back. One paper is for you to choose your preferred party for the National Assembly. The other paper is for you to choose your preferred party for the provincial legislature for the province in which you live. You do not have to fill in the same party on both ballot papers – you can choose different parties if you want. What information is on the ballot papers?The full name of each political partyThe abbreviated name or shortened name of each partyThe logo or symbol of each partyA photograph of each party leaderA blank space for you to indicate the party of your choice The voting process 1. Entrance: When you get to the entrance of the voting station, the door controller will tell you when it is your turn to enter. 2. ID Document: You will be directed to the voters’ roll table where IEC staff will look at your ID book or temporary ID certificate and check for your name on the voters’ roll. If you are not on the voters’ roll, but have proof that you have registered, such as a registration sticker, the presiding officer must validate your proof of registration. If the officer is satisfied with the proof, you will have to complete a VEC4 form (national elections) or MEC7 form (municipal elections) and will then be allowed to continue as an ordinary voter. 3. Inked thumb: IEC staff will ink your left thumb. This is special ink that will not wash off for several days. It will show everyone you participated (and prevent people from voting more than once). Your ID book will also be stamped to show you have voted. 4. Ballot paper: The voting officer will stamp the back of two official ballot papers (one for the national election; the other for the provincial election) and give them to you. 5. Voting booth: You will be directed to an empty voting booth. You will be alone in a voting booth. Your vote is your secret. Here, you will place your X in the box next to the political party of your choice on both ballot papers. Your vote does not have to be the same. Fold your papers and leave the voting booth. If you incorrectly mark a ballot paper and realise this before placing it in the ballot box, just ask the presiding officer for a new ballot paper. Make sure that the incorrect ballot paper is marked as “cancelled”. 6. Ballot box: Place your folded ballot papers into the right ballot box: one for national; the other for provincial votes. Once your ballot has been placed in the ballot box, it can’t be removed. 7. Exit: Make your way to the exit. Security staff will be there to help you.Physically disabled voters If you are physically disabled or visually impaired, you can choose someone to help you at the voting station. The Presiding Officer can also help you cast your vote, but an observer and, if available, two agents from different parties must be present. How do you make your mark? Make your mark in the box next to the party of your choice. Make only one mark per ballot paper. Your mark must not touch any of the walls/lines of the box. It is best to make a cross. If you make a mistake, do not put your paper in the box. Call an IEC official, who will cancel your paper and give you a new one. Once you have made your mark, fold each ballot paper in half. An IEC official will then check the stamp on the back of every ballot. You can then place your paper into the relevant boxes.The counting process The overall election results will be worked out using a computer system at centralised venues under the control of the IEC. Counting mostly happens at each voting station. Votes can be counted at a place other than at the voting station only with the approval of the IEC. Since the 2009 elections, there are improved controls over the record paper with the final results for a voting station. This has to be signed by the presiding officer and all political parties, and then scanned to create an immediate record and so more trust and openness in the process of compiling results.Explanation of the counting process 1. Verify: Accredited observers and party agents watch over the entire process, starting with the opening and emptying of the sealed ballot boxes. 2. Unfold: Each ballot is unfolded and the back is checked for a stamp. Ballots without stamps are not counted. 3. Sorted: The ballots are sorted into piles according to votes for each party. The counting officer must decide whether or not a questionable ballot paper (where it is not definitively clear which party has been voted for) should be counted or rejected. Party agents can dispute this. 4. Count and bundle: The ballots are counted and bundled into packs of 100. The results are then tallied for each party. 5. Reconcile and recount (if necessary): The results for the various parties are now reconciled against the total number of ballots. If the numbers do not match, there is a recount of all the votes. 6. Sign results slips and seal ballots: Results are recorded on to a results system that has automated quality controls to ensure accuracy of results. Results slips are signed by the counting officer and the party agents and are scanned to allow political parties to compare against recorded results. 7. Results centres: The results are posted on the door of the voting station and are also electronically sent to the national and nine provincial results centres where they are verified and collated. Independent external auditors audit this process. 8. Final results: The final results and seat allocations for national and provincial legislatures are announced by the chief electoral officer – usually within seven days of the election.Objections You can object against anything that happens during the elections that can affect the election results. You must make an objection before 5pm on the second day after voting. The IEC will investigate your objection and can ask you to give evidence about the objection. The IEC will decide what to do about the objection. The IEC must make a decision within three days after receiving your objection. If you are not happy with the IEC’s decision, you can appeal to the Electoral Court within three days of the IEC’s decision. After all objections are dealt with, the IEC must announce the final results within seven days of Election Day. In practice, the IEC has managed to announce election results on the third day after Voting Day. SAinfo reporter and Independent Electoral Commissionlast_img read more

Bafana at Afcon 2015: the full squad

first_imgThe new 2015 Africa Cup of Nations Bafana Bafana team before their warm-up game against Cameroon on Saturday 10 January, which came to a one-all draw. (Image: Bafana Bafana) Compiled by Mary AlexanderWith Bafana Bafana, South Africa’s national football team, set to kick off their first match in the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations on Monday 19 January, playing Algeria at the Estadio de Mongomo in Equatorial Guinea, we bring you facts and figures about the full 23-man squad.Jump to:StrikersMidfieldersDefendersGoalkeepersStrikersBernard ParkerBorn: 16 March 1986, BoksburgAge: 28Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2004Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #25, forwardCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaTokelo RantieBorn: 8 September 1990, Parys, Free StateAge: 24Height: 1.72 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: AFC Bournemouth – #28, forwardCurrent league: English Championship LeagueBongani NdululaBorn: 29 November 1989, Aliwal NorthAge: 25Height: 1.9 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: AmaZulu FC – #9, forwardCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaSibusiso VilakaziBorn: 29 December 1989, SowetoAge: 25Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Bidvest Wits FC – #10, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaNew Bafana Bafana coach Shakes Mashaba has been credited with bringing the national squad back to form, allowing them to qualify for the 2015 African Cup of Nations and beating out Nigeria, the previous champions. (Image: Bafana Bafana)Back to topMidfieldersThemba ZwaneBorn: 3 August 1989, TembisaAge: 25Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2011Current club: Mamelodi Sundowns FC – #34, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaAndile JaliBorn: 10 April 1990, Matatiele, Eastern CapeAge: 24Height: 1.72 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: KV Oostende – #15, midfielderCurrent league: Belgian Pro LeagueReneilwe LetsholonyaneBorn: 9 June 1982, SowetoAge: 32Height: 1.73 metresCareer start: 2002Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #6, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBongani ZunguBorn: 9 October 1992, Duduza, GautengAge: 22Height: 1.84 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Mamelodi Sundowns FC – #34, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaThamsanqa SangweniBorn: 26 May 1989, Empangeni, KwaZulu-NatalAge: 25Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Ajax Cape Town FC – #37, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaDean FurmanBorn: 22 June 1988, Cape TownAge: 26Height: 1.83 metresCareer start: 2008Current club: Doncaster Rovers FC – #4, midfielderCurrent league: English League OneThuso PhalaBorn: 27 May 1986, SowetoAge: 28Height: 1.7 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: SuperSport United FC – #21, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaMandla MasangoBorn: 18 July 1989, Kwaggafontein, MpumalangaAge: 25Height: 1.68 metresCareer star: 2007Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #22, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaOupa ManyisaBorn: 30 July 1988, Mohlakeng, GautengAge: 26Height: 1.65 metresCareer start: 2008Current club: Orlando Pirates FC – #20, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaWatch Bafana Bafana’s road to the 2015 Africa Cup of Nations:Back to topDefendersSiyabonga NhlapoBorn: 23 December 1988, SowetoAge: 26Height: 1.8 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Bidvest Wits FC – #20, midfielderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaPatrick PhungwayoBorn: 6 January 1988, Alexandra, GautengAge: 27Height: 1.73 metresCareer start: 2008Current club: Orlando Pirates FC – #3, left-backCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaAnele NgcongcaBorn: 21 October, 1987, Cape TownAge: 27Height: 1.8 metresCareer start: 2003Current club: KRC Genk – #16, defenderCurrent league: Belgian Pro LeagueThulani HlatshwayoBorn: 18 December 1989, SowetoAge: 25Height: 1.89 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Ajax Cape Town FC – #3, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaEric MathohoBorn: 1 March 1990, Thohoyandou, LimpopoAge: 24Height: 1.98 metresCareer start: 2009Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #3, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaRivaldo CoetzeeBorn: 16 October 1996, Kakamas, Northern CapeAge: 18Height: 1.79 metresCareer start: 2014Current club: Ajax Cape Town FC – #3, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaThabo MatlabaBorn: 13 December 1987, Tembisa, GautengAge: 27Height: 1.69 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Orlando Pirates FC – #8, defenderCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBack to topGoalkeepersDarren KeetBorn: 5 August 1989, Cape TownAge: 25Height: 1.83 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: KV Kortrijk – #16, goalkeeperCurrent league: Belgian Pro LeagueJackson MabokgwaneBorn: 19 January 1988, Polokwane, LimpopoAge: 26Height: 1.88 metresCareer start: 2007Current club: Bidvest Wits FC – #1, goalkeeperCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBrilliant KhuzwayoBorn: 9 February 1990, DurbanAge: 24Height: 1.9 metresCareer start: 2010Current club: Kaizer Chiefs FC – #16, goalkeeperCurrent league: Premier Soccer League, South AfricaBack to toplast_img read more

Erzähle die Geschichte Deiner Geocaching-Reise

first_imgVergiss nicht, Deine Geocaches online zu loggen.Ein Geocache besteht nicht nur aus einem Ort und einer Dose. Mit jedem Fund – oder Nichtfund – ist immer auch eine Geschichte verbunden. Diese Geschichten sind die Logeinträge, die Geocacher auf der Seite des Geocaches hinterlassen. Es gibt zahlreiche Gründe, aus denen Du bei den von Dir angegangenen Geocaches hochwertige Logs hinterlassen solltest, aber für den Anfang findest Du hier schon mal ein paar:Geocache-Owner lesen gern neue Logs. Sie helfen ihnen auch dabei festzustellen, wie es um ihren Geocache bestellt ist.Andere Geocacher suchen gern in früheren Logs nach Tipps und weiteren Informationen.DNF-Logs teilen anderen Geocachern mit, dass der Geocache möglicherweise doch etwas komplizierter als erwartet ist oder eine Wartung benötigt.Also zeige der Geocaching-Gemeinschaft, was es heißt, einen tollen Logeintrag zu verfassen: Teile auf der Geocaching-Seite auf Facebook den besten Logeintrag, den Du jemals gelesen (oder geschrieben) hast. SharePrint Related5 Tipps für die Planung Deines nächsten Urlaubs mit GeocachingMay 22, 2015In “Deutsch”Vier Tipps zum Verstecken von QualitätsgeocachesFebruary 19, 2019In “Deutsch”Die Evolution der GeocachesNovember 19, 2019In “Deutsch” Share with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

The New Mad Men Of Advertising Are… Everywhere

first_imgCrowdsourced advertising platforms – some with Silicon Valley backing – are sprouting up to liberate untapped talent from around the world and remake television (and video) advertising. Companies such as Tongal, Zooppa, Poptent and others are tapping the crowd for talent and hoping to leverage social media’s expanding reach and real-time impact to strengthen ties between products and people. Can you tell who made the Dannon yogurt commercial below starring John Stamos? It aired during last year’s Super Bowl:>In fact, the ad was created by Remy and Andrew Neymarc, a pair of twenty-something brothers raised in France and possessing no formal video training. Their concept was chosen amongst thousands via the crowdsource advertising platform Poptent.The crowd is seizing control.Talent is EverywhereCollege students – think Michael Dell and Mark Zuckerberg – can launch highly disruptive multi-billion dollar businesses right from their dorm room. But can they direct? Can they create mega-popular, award-winning television advertisements for global brands? The answer is a resounding yes. Ideas can come from anywhere, and talent resides everywhere. The commercial below, for example, is the direct result of crowd participation. The original idea for the ad and then, later, the finished commercial, were selected from entries by creators – some professional, many amateur – around the world. Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… brian s hall Deconstructing the AdvertisementWhereas companies like Poptent have created a platform that connects global talent with big brands, Tongal has taken the crowdsourcing model one step further – by deconstructing the advertisement into its constituent parts.For example, I may have the perfect idea for the next great iPhone commercial. Note: Idea for next great iPhone ad: a virtual 3D Steve Jobs and Tupac Shakur share iTunes Radio playlists and wisdom as they are seated cross-legged on a barren desert.Problem: I have absolutely no filming talent. Using Tongal’s platform, big brands offer “challenge rewards” not only for fully edited video advertisements, but for ideas for commercials. Tongal president and co-founder, James DeJulio, told me that this new model will permanently disrupt how television advertising gets made:So many talented people have until now had little access to do really creative work. In Hollywood, for example, every studio relies on the same ten names for every action. (Crowdsourcing) rearranges the labor market for creative work.Tongal has received $15 million in venture capital funding. The company works with popular brands by crafting an advertising “challenge.” First, is the idea challenge – anyone can submit a idea for the brand’s next commercial. The crowd – at least, those registered on the Tongal site – can submit and/or vote on these ideas. The most popular ones are then awarded a cash prize of, say, $500.Video artists can then craft an advertisement based on the top five most popular ideas, for example. Again, these videos are voted on and the winner receives, say, $25,000. In addition, each winning participant across the challenge’s several stages has a chance for an additional slice of the reward pool. If the second most popular “idea” is ultimately used in the winning video, for example, the person with that idea receives an additional reward.The entire process, from creating the challenge, generating ideas, and developing a finished advertisement takes about 8 weeks – far faster than the traditional model. Throughout the process the challenge is simultaneously being aggressively promoted on Twitter and Facebook. DeJulio estimates that “easily 10-20% of all television advertising over the next few years” will be based on a crowdsourced model. That’s tens of billions of dollars.Surprisingly, money is not the driving factor for many participants. “More money typically equals better participation,” says DeJulio, but this is not always the case. The more people that use a product, such as a toothbrush or deodorant, the more likely it is that more and better ideas are generated via the crowd. This is doubly so, he suggests, for products that have a rabid fan base – for instance, women’s shoes.A Whole New WorldThe rapid advancement of low-cost HD video tools, steady cams, and professional editing software, combined with globally accessible social media platforms which aggregate and empower the crowd, are finally disrupting the insular, highly profitable television advertising business.Lego, Pringles, Axe, Pepsi, Nokia, and numerous others now rely upon crowdsourcing to generate ideas and foster new talent. Everyone wins. Big brands get a great commercial, possibly at a much lower price, and far faster than ever before. At the same time, talented folks from around the world have a chance to build a career in a new industry. Teens such as Zach Boivin have already earned thousands. Consider this advertising challenge linking Pringles and Star Wars. It yielded thousands of fan-generated entries, such as the one below. Big brands use the crowd not just for ideas, talent and inspiration, but to help generate brand awareness – even at the ad concept stage.Pizza Hut, for example, encouraged football fans to submit videos incorporating the idea of quarterbacks shouting “hut” to hike the ball. Along with many great entries received, the campaign itself was a clever means of increasing brand awareness long before any finished advertisement even made it onto the television screen.While Pizza Hut selected the finalists in its crowdsourced challenge, a popular vote was used to decide which ad made it to the Super Bowl. The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos This is in large part because viewers place a higher level of trust in television advertisements. Even in the second decade of the 21st century, television ads influence viewers far more than most other forms. Yes, this is also true for tech-savvy teens and young adults.Television Advertising In A Multi-Screen WorldTelevision may command a disproportionate share of trust and influence among advertising media, but each new advertising channel – your Twitter feed, or your smartphone screen, for example – has the potential to distract once faithful viewers.It’s also now much harder for brands to develop and distribute a consistent message across these multiple channels, screens and media platforms. What works on the television screen may do nothing for someone updating their Facebook page on their iPhone. Multiple ads with varying sensibilities are thus required even for a single brand or product. This has forced advertisers to seek out new talent and new avenues for promotion.Kurt Lohse is marketing director for Poptent, a social media platform that links brands looking for advertising with freelancers from around the world. The 65,000 independent filmmakers registered with Poptent, he told me, “run the gamut from boutique ad agencies to film school students with basic training.”In a multi-screen world, well-made video content remains one of the most effective sales tools available, and demand continues to grow as the range of possible media outlets expands. Think “Super Bowl commercials to viral videos, web videos and everything in between,” as Lohse puts it.In this new world, big brands need the crowd just to meet demand.The Crowd Wants What The Crowd WantsWith more screens, more channels and more media platforms, it’s also become much harder for advertisers to deeply connect with every group or demographic. The top-down model no longer works. Asking a crowd to create an ad is much more likely to result in something that resonates with, well, that specific crowd. PepsiCo, which owns a number of food brands, including Doritos, has done just that in order to appeal to multiple demographics, particularly younger ones. In this case, the rather odd crowdsourced advertisement featuring a goat ultimately made it into the company’s Super Bowl ad blitz.  Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Crowdsourced participation in the traditional world of television advertising is a big deal. The global advertising market has an estimated value in excess of half a trillion dollars. In a world of tablets and “second screens,” DVRs and YouTube, television still grabs the majority of this bounty. The winner, to be selected later this month, will receive a $25,000 fee, and the winning ad will be shown on national TV.  Tags:#advertising#crowdsourcing#television A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

Ban vs Ire: Bangladesh beat Ireland by 27 runs

first_imgBangladesh beat Ireland by 27 runs in their Group B match of the cricket World Cup in Mirpur on Friday. Score Earlier, Bangladesh were let down by a shoddy batting performance as a disciplined Ireland skittled them out for 205 in a Group B match.Electing to bat, Bangladesh’s batsmen failed to build partnerships with Tamim Iqbal (44), Mushfiqur Rahim (36) and Raqibul Hasan (38) being the only noteworthy contributors to the total.To Bangladesh’s embarrassment, the team did not even last the full 50 overs and folded up in 49.2 overs.The Irish had got the better of Bangladesh even in the previous edition of the World Cup and had the upperhand for most of the first half of the crunch game a loss in which would severely jeopardise the co-hosts’ chances of advancing to the quarterfinals.It was a fantastic start to the proceedings for the hosts after winning the toss as they raced to their 50 in just 5.4 overs.But the slide was not too far either and it started with opener Imrul Kayes (12) being sent back by pacer John Mooney in the seventh over.Next man in, Junaid Siddique, didn’t last long either and was run out by Ed Joyce after contributing just three runs to the total.Three overs after Siddique’s dismissal, Bangladesh were dealt a massive blow when Tamim was dismissed by Andre Botha.After striking seven boundaries in his 43-ball knock, Tamim drove Botha outside off stump only to be caught by Irish skipper William Porterfield at point, leaving the packed crowd stunned in silence.With skipper Shakib Al Hasan also making a hasty exit after contributing 16 runs, Bangladesh were in dire straits at 86/4 in just the 16th over.But Rahim and Raqibul got together to put on 61 runs for the fifth wicket and steady the rocking boat, albeit temporarily.Their partnership was broken when Rahim’s attempted sweep off 18-year-old spinner George Dockrell landed straight into the hands of Andrew White.His dismissal triggered another collapse with senior batsman and former captain Mohammad Ashraful (1), who was brought back into the side to strengthen the faltering line-up, coming a cropper lasting just one over.Given the top-order collapse, the tail could not do much either save for Naeem Islam, who added 29 vital runs to the score including three boundaries.For Ireland, Botha picked up three wickets, conceding just 32 runs in his nine runs, while Dockrell clinched a couple of scalps in his 10 overs during which he gave only 23 runs.advertisement- With PTI inputslast_img read more

SPORT-MCA-THOMSON 2 LAST

first_imgHowever, Thomson said he realised the difficulties in However, Thomson said he realised the difficulties in fast bowlers bowling a lot of overs in Indian track and weather conditions. “These flat wickets could be a bit of a problem. You have to look after the bowlers, monitor their work load,” said the former fast bowler who picked up 200 wickets in 51 Tests. “The biggest things are skill and control, apart from the desire to be the best, better than the one next to you. Otherwise you will be an also ran,” he added. Thomson said he has coached a football team in Australia, apart from guiding the Queensland state team to the Sheffield Shield in cricket and coaching Zimbabwe in England in 1999. He felt that one month gave him enough time to work on the Mumbai bowlers skill set when he compared it to his 10 days work with his former fast bowling partner, Lillee, in the MRF pace foundation in Chennai once in the past. “I am annoyed at (the state of) cricket coaching these days. A lot of funny coaching is going around. My job here is to share the tricks of the trade. I love imparting knowledge and attitude. Fast bowlers have a lot of attitude. They need to be aggressive. “Its a challenge. Hopefully kids will learn and go on to play for India. Its all about making kids think for themselves. Its not hard work, just repetition, what is required of the situation. “Any fast bowler can do it on a green top. Its when things dont help you. You got to work it out yourself as you cant run to the coaches during the two-hour session,” he added. Former India captain and MCA Vice-President Dilip Vengsarkar said Thomson was among the fastest bowlers he had faced in his career. “I faced him on my first tour to Australia in 1977-78, for the first time in the tour game against Queensland. I couldnt see the fourth or fifth ball he bowled to me at Brisbane and in the Test match that followed I was on 48 (out of teams first innings total of 153 all out) when one of his bouncers hit my cap and fell on the stumps and I got out hit-wicket,” he recalled. PTI SSR NRB PDS BSadvertisementlast_img read more

SIOUX CITY YOUNKERS STORE AMONG SEVERAL TO BE LIQUIDATED

first_imgSioux City’s Younkers is among seven stores in the state that the company has given notice that they are expecting to layoff employees and then close.Iowa State University Economist Dave Swenson says the closings indicate a basic issue of supply and demand in retail:Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/YOUNK.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………..number of stores. :14Swenson says online shopping has impacted all types of retail stores and it has had an impact on Younkers as well.But, he says it’s the type of store that Younkers is that is one of the biggest factors.Audio Playerhttp://kscj.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/YOUNK2.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume.OC………have closed” :15Reports indicate Bon-Ton, the parent company of the Younkers stores, will be sold to a liquidation company that will shut the stores down.Younkers began in Iowa 162 years ago and has been in Sioux City for over 70 years.Eighty-four people are employed locally.The Sioux City store at the Southern Hills Mall is expected to close June 5th.last_img read more