Keynote address by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa at the 2015 EY Strategic Growth Forum on Africa

first_imgJohanneburg, 3 November, 2015 – At the 2015 EY Strategic Growth Forum on Africa, South Africa’s deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa said that if companies want to expand into Africa, they would need to understand that the continent is diverse and that growth strategies need to be tailored according to each country’s needs.South African deputy president, Cyril RamaphosaProgramme Director,EY Chief Executive Officer Ajen Sita,Ladies and Gentlemen,Thank you for inviting me to officially open the EY Strategic Growth Forum, a valuable platform for engagement on the challenges and opportunities in Africa.This Forum is an acknowledgement that Africa’s growth and development narrative is changing.It is an acknowledgment that while we appreciate many of the difficulties, we have not sufficiently explored the possibilities.The programme for this Forum seeks to look beyond conventional wisdom. You will most probably during the course of this conference be looking at what I regard as mega-trends that are unfolding and influencing a great deal of things that are happening in the world.The programme for this Forum is therefore quite exciting.It is a fresh approach that is reflective, evidence-based and forward-looking.It acknowledges that human progress depends on social interactions, better coordination of responses and shared responsibility.It is an approach that allows us all to take ownership of our common future.Ladies and Gentlemen,To do business well in Africa today requires more than traditional economic analysis.It requires an understanding that Africa is a very diverse continent, with a vast array of different social structures, political systems, economies, products and markets.For this reason, there is no single African growth story.And no business that seeks to operate across the continent can pursue a single African growth strategy.Africa is simply too large and too diverse.Yet, despite all this variety, most African economies share common features.Most are reliant on the extraction and export of raw materials.Most are constrained by inadequate infrastructure, low skills levels and limited industrial capacity.This exposes many African economies to fluctuations in commodity prices and depressed global demand.The lack of industrial capacity means that many African countries are unable to extract sufficient value from their natural resources.They are not able to realise the potential benefits for job creation, improved export earnings and inclusive growth.That is the part of the African story we know well.But the African story is changing.Africa’s future depends not so much on the rise of commodity prices but on the expansion and development of its human capital.A continent of over a billion people, Africa is said to have the fastest-growing middle class in the world.Opportunities that were not available a mere generation ago, are now within reach of millions more people.More Africans are educated, more are employed, more own assets.Africa has a young and rapidly expanding workforce.Over the next few decades, as many other countries grapple with the challenges of an ageing workforce, Africa has the potential to become the most vibrant, innovative and productive region in the world.But to achieve this potential, African countries – individually and collectively – need to pursue deliberate political, social and economic measures.Many of these measures are described in the African Union’s Agenda 2063.And many of them are being implemented.Even as many economies still rely on commodity exports, there is significant investment in other sectors.The growth in retail banking, telecommunications, information technology, niche and finished goods has been remarkable.African economies are becoming more diverse, more industrialised and more innovative.Today a large proportion of transfers in foreign currency are not carried out through the international banks, but through mobile money remittances from the African diaspora.Several African airlines, led by the likes of Kenya Airways and Ethiopian Airlines, are becoming more commercial viable, investing in new aircraft, opening up new routes and increasing intra-Africa commerce and trade.In countries like Nigeria and Kenya, even with limited internet connectivity, innovative technological solutions are improving the lives of rural communities.Cellphone-based technologies are revolutionising the practice of medicine.Thanks to apps being developed on this continent, a health worker at a rural clinic can refer an issue for specialist diagnosis, in real time, by simply taking a cellphone photo of a patient’s eye.African economies have both the potential and ability to leapfrog advanced economies in developing technologies suitable for local conditions and needs.Economic change in Africa is taking place alongside political change.Governments are increasingly concerned with need for stability as a precondition for economic growth and social development.African countries are more united than ever before in promoting good governance, regional integration and multilateralism.Through our work in the African Union we are steadily establishing an integrated community that values accountability, good governance and transparency.Through a strong peer review mechanism we are seeing less conflict.With some notable exceptions, changes in government take place through the ballot box and not through the barrel of a gun.More than ever Africa is resolving its challenges through mediation, peace and dialogue.African countries are working hard to transform their economies.Governments are supporting programmes that promote manufacturing and competitiveness.They are encouraging new growth opportunities by investing in economic and social infrastructure.Importantly, African countries are collaborating on cross-border infrastructure projects that foster greater integration and trade.Many of these fall under the auspices of the Presidential Infrastructure Championing Initiative headed by President Jacob Zuma.This initiative is providing political leadership to projects such as the trans-Saharan highway between Algeria and Nigeria, the Grand Inga Dam in the DRC, and the North-South Corridor in Southern Africa.At a national level – in South Africa – we are undertaking a massive infrastructure investment programme overseen by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission.It is improving the capacity of our economy through better roads, ports, railways, electricity generation capacity and water infrastructure.It is improving people’s lives through new hospitals, clinics, schools and bus rapid transit systems.It is part of a broader economic strategy that seeks to grow the economy by increasing investment in productive economic sectors like manufacturing, agriculture.Central to the economic future of our country is the development of the skills of its people.Nowhere has the impact of apartheid been more keenly felt than in education.By depriving generations of black South Africans of a decent education, the apartheid government sought to deny them and their descendants a prosperous future.We have allocated R640 billion to basic education over the next three years. Much of this will go to improving school infrastructure, ensuring all learners receive suitable learning materials, and improving teacher training.We have significantly expanded access to higher education, and have increased the funding available to poor students through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).The amount disbursed annually by NSFAS has grown by approximately 270% since 2008, and is budgeted to grow even further in the next few years.But what has been made very clear by events over the last few weeks is that the funding of higher education remains a critical problem.We need to ensure that no-one is excluded from higher education because of an inability to pay.At the same time, we need to find funding mechanisms that are sustainable and ensure a high quality of education.We should therefore welcome the decision that the Presidential task team established to look at funding higher education will now be broadened to look at other issues of transformation in the sector.This is a matter of great urgency and great consequence.No country has managed to achieve what we are seeking to achieve without affordable, accessible, quality higher education.Through their actions, the students of South Africa have, quite correctly, underlined this critical imperative.As a country, we must now move with speed and purpose to address these fundamental issues of access, transformation and quality outcomes.Ladies and Gentlemen, there are many ways to describe Africa’s recent progress and the expectations that many have of its imminent economic and social emergence.During the course of this Forum we can expect that these descriptions will be scrutinised and enriched and enhanced.I would now like to turn to what I referred to in my opening remarks as mega-trends that business needs to address and pay attention to.EY has produced a report setting out five mega trends, to which I have added my own five.  The 10 trends are:1. Shared value;2. Regional integration;3. Infrastructure development;4. Entrepreneurship;5. Partnership;6. The level of consciousness of the people of the world is rising; people are becoming more discerning and are not prepared to accept shoddy service;7. Growth of the middle class, and on the African continent in particular;8. People’s demand for good governance;9. Innovation, particularly the grasp of technology in Africa10. Hope for the future: people are more hopeful about the future; (even) when they protest, they are doing so to secure a better future.I would like to conclude with what I consider to be one of the most compelling accounts of what we are witnessing in Africa today.It was written over a century ago by Pixley ka Isaka Seme.He said:“The brighter day is rising upon Africa. Already I seem to see her chains dissolved, her desert plains red with harvest, her Abyssinia and her Zululand the seats of science and religion, reflecting the glory of the rising sun from the spires of their churches and universities.“Her Congo and her Gambia whitened with commerce, her crowded cities sending forth the hum of business, and all her sons employed in advancing the victories of peace-greater and more abiding than the spoils of war.“Yes, the regeneration of Africa belongs to this new and powerful period!”I thank you.last_img read more

Oyama Matomela flies South Africa’s friendly skies

first_imgCatch Oyama Matomela and other inspiring South Africans playing their part to build a strong South Africa in the Play Your Part TV series on Sundays at 9pm on SABC2. Matomela was born in 1991 in Port Elizabeth and it was there, in the friendly city, that her aunt would take her and her cousins to the Port Elizabeth International Airport to watch aircraft take off and land. • Brand South Africa +27 11 483 0122 info@brandsouthafrica.com • Ellis uses sport to build a better world • Ginwala helped shape South Africa’s history • Mam’ Khanyi rescues Hillbrow’s forgotten children • Graça Machel is a heroine in her own right • Bassie is a beauty with heartMelissa Jane CookAt just 23 years old Oyama Matomela is flying high as a female pilot in South Africa.Matomela was born in 1991 in Port Elizabeth and it was there, in the friendly city, that her aunt would take her and her cousins to the Port Elizabeth International Airport to watch aircraft take off and land.“These Sunday afternoon visits unveiled an incomparable passion and love for flying at a young age. Research and extensive hard work in my high school years led to me being awarded a bursary by the Department of Roads and Transport of the Eastern Cape to begin my flying training at the renowned 43 Air School [in Port Alfred],” she says.“I chose this career because it’s unlike any other. I’ve had these aspirations from a young age…” she says.The Collegiate Girls School alumnus is the fourth student to have been awarded the provincial department bursary, and the first woman.“The year and eight months I spent training was probably one of the most difficult yet rewarding things I have ever done,” she says. She adds: “The training was challenging and 110% effort was required – which is what I was willing to give to reach my goals at this age.”After passing her Private Pilot Licence (PPL), she later obtained an instrument-rated commercial pilot licence in August 2011. An instrument rating grants her licence to fly across international airspaces.Matomela passed the PPL in just 20 months; the average time to complete the course is between one and five years, depending on how frequently, and what aircraft, students fly, and in what weather.In March 2012 she wrote and passed all the airline transport pilot licence examinations, which then upgraded her licence to a frozen airline transport pilot licence. She commenced training towards a Grade III flight instructor rating in September 2012 and successfully completed the course in December 2012.Oyama Matomela on inspiring new waysMatomela then moved to Johannesburg in June 2013 to begin work as a flight instructor at Superior Pilot Services at Grand Central Airport in Midrand, where cadet pilots from South African Express airline are trained.A few months later she was invited for an interview with South African Express for a junior first officer position. The interview was successful and she joined the team in January 2013. She is currently training to fly the Bombardier Dash Q400 aircraft.Matomela hopes to earn a command on the jet fleet and become a training captain, and says her family, especially her mother, is proud of her accomplishments in such a male-dominated field. She gives special thanks to her mother, who she says “has been with her every step of the way throughout her training, in good and bad days”.last_img read more

And action! It’s time to start planning your GIFF event!

first_imgThe Geocaching International Film Festival (GIFF) is still three months away (November 2 – 6) but now is the perfect time to start planning your event. Don’t know where to start? Look here for help.GIFF is your only chance to earn a souvenir by watching a whole series of unique and fun geocaching movies. For more inspiration, check out these amazing moments from GIFF 2016.Questions you should think about while planning:What equipment will you use to show the finalist films?How many people will come and how many seats do you need?Will your film night have a theme, snacks, or film judging?How to host a GIFF Event:Read the tips for hosting an event.Submit your event listing on Geocaching.com at least two weeks prior to the date of your event and wait for it to be published by a Volunteer Reviewer.Once your event is published, fill out the GIFF Sign Up Form.Wait for your event to be approved via email by the GIFF team at HQ. Approved events will be added to the GIFF 2017 bookmark list and will receive the GIFF film reel file prior to the event.Are you looking for GIFF Geocoins or other merchandise items? Check out our Shop.Share with your Friends:More SharePrint Relatedlast_img read more

Grips, Gaffers, and Best Boys: The Grip and Electric Departments

first_imgTo achieve the best looking shot, a cinematographer not only relies on the camera department, but also the lighting technicians, electricians, and grips. But what do they all do on set?A Director of Photography is usually associated with the camera department, but the DP actually oversees the Electrical Department and Grips as well. Before the days of unions, there was not a differentiating line between members of these departments. As job titles have become more solidified, so have the departments.You may also hear the term Lighting Department, but it’s not accurate. Most of the time you will hear Grips and Electric called G&E. Here is a breakdown of the G&E Departments.The Electrical DepartmentThis department is in charge of all electrical needs on set. That covers everything from powering set lights to powering the coffee machine.GafferImage via FM Grip and LightingA gaffer is the head of the electrical department. They may also be referred to as the Chief Lighting Technician. The gaffer is responsible for designing and executing the lighting plan. They work directly with the Director of Photography to achieve the desired look. They will provide the power needed for for the lights, and work with the Key Grip to shape the light.Best BoyThe Best Boy in the Electric department is the head assistant to the gaffer. They are the second in charge, typically watching over the electric truck and rentals, while managing and scheduling the rest of the electricians and lighting technicians. Where the Gaffer remains on set with the Director of Photography, the Best Boy carries out and manages all other jobs in the Electrical Department.They may also be referred to as Best Boy Electric or Assistant Chief Lighting Technician. Before the different departments were established, the Gaffer would ask the Key Grip to borrow his “best boy” to assist in the electric department. It became a common term in both departments, which is why there are two different Best Boys. If a female holds this position, she is still referred to as the Best Boy.Electrical Lighting TechnicianImage via ShutterstockThey are responsible for getting power to the set. They are also called; ELT, Electrician, Set Lighting Technicians, Lamp Operator, Electric, Spark or Juicer. They not only get power to the lights, but also everywhere on set. This includes trailers, catering, offices, and more.Generator OperatorFor location shoots, films will use generators for power. Generators, commonly called a Genny, produce electricity from diesel fuel. The person in charge of a generator is called the Genny Operator.Lighting Board OperatorDepending on the size of the set, or the amount of lights, there may be a Lighting Board Operator. These are not common on small sets with a few fixed lights. They are really only used if the scene being shot requires dimmable lights. All the set lights will be run to a control panel that this person will use to adjust and dim the lights. This position is more common on television sets, especially those with a live studio audience.The Grip DepartmentThis department supports all non-electrical components on set. They set up any gear for the camera, like tripods or cranes.Key GripImage: Key Grip Robert Adams on set of Wild Safari via Fernbank Museum of Natural HistoryThe Key Grip, also called a Key for short, is the chief of the grip department. They work with the Director of Photography to achieve the correct lighting and blocking for shots. They diffuse and cut light on set. They are also in charge of the physical camera movement, covering everything from a dolly, to cranes, to vehicle mounts.Best BoyThe chief assistant to the Key Grip. Also knows as the Best Boy Grip. Just like the Best Boy Electric, they are in charge of the organizing and maintaining the grip truck and all other grips working on the project.GripImage via ShutterstockGrips are specialized as camera and lighting rigging technicians.  They work with the non-electrical components of light and camera setups. This includes setting up tripods, cranes, flagging, overheads, and bounces. They make any adjustments and perform maintenance on production equipments. They will cover all duties from camera movement, focusing lights, and any mechanical rigging like dolly tracks.Dolly GripImage via What If MovieThis grip is specifically in charge of working with the camera dolly. They lay and level the dolly track on set.  They will also push and pull the dolly during filming.Do you now know the difference between a Best Boy and a Best Boy? Want more articles like this? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

Interview: The First Filmmakers to Shoot with the Canon C200

first_imgGet insights from the director and DP behind Canon’s From Dock to Dish.Images via Canon Pro.When the Canon C200 was first announced, the camera manufacturer released the short documentary, From Dock to Dish. We had the chance to interview Director Andrew Fried and Director of Photography Bryant Fisher to discuss their experience shooting and working with the Canon C200. Here’s what we learned.PB: Andrew Fried, From Dock to Dish is a beautiful film. Why did you gravitate toward this concept to highlight the new features of the Canon C200?Andrew: Over the last few years, I have had the distinct privilege to spend time filming in some of the best restaurants in the world. I’ve been consumed lately with the idea that so many people come to these restaurants, enjoy such a special experience and loft such high praise about the food that they’ve eaten, but rarely look past their plate to truly consider all of the people that have played a role in bringing this food to their table. That was the seed of the idea here: to see the entire process and everyone who is truly involved from start to finish.PB: Bryant Fisher, the concept behind “From Dock to Dish” features a lot of different lighting scenarios. What was it like to know you’d be testing and challenging this new camera in a variety of scenarios?Bryant: This was an exciting challenge to me. I’ve used Canon cameras in the past and know they hold up in well in all kinds of scenarios. I wanted to see what Canon packed into this new camera to handle those kinds of scenarios even better. The C200 gave us a very rich image with hardly any help in front of the lens. It felt very consistent and natural with its color and exposure handling.PB: The Cinema RAW Light is an exciting new feature. Why was this a valuable tool for you and for other filmmakers?Bryant: The Cinema RAW Light format is a big step forward for Canon. I think it speaks largely to where they are putting their focus. I hope they implement this format in all of their cinema cameras down the line. You are getting a 12bit 4K image at around 1gbps data rate. Thats an enormous amount of information to capture, but they’ve managed to get it to 1/3-1/5 the size of typical RAW. This is exciting and empowering to filmmakers because for the first time, you have this format as a real option at a relatively low price point. For us, it only strengthened our film to help illustrate the colorful journey of our fish.PB: How was working with the Canon ecosystem of products from the camera to the lenses and monitors?Andrew: As a filmmaker, we each have our own set of gear that we like to bring out with us in the field. Generally, it’s pieced together from things made by different manufacturers, and often it can be a challenge for the camera team to “make it all work together.” Going out with only Canon gear actually made it a whole lot easier in the field. As much as we all hold on to the tools that we have always worked with, the Canon lenses actually do complement the Canon camera nicely, and having the Canon monitor with us out in the field was really beneficial. The pieces all do actually want to work together, which at the very least, makes the AC’s day a whole lot more efficient.Bryant: It is exactly that. An ecosystem. Canon seems to be focusing on capturing quality in the image and its evident through the whole pipeline. The lenses work well and interact with their cameras. The images display very well on their monitors. We sent an ungraded LOG 3 image to their 2420 Reference Display, and it debayered that signal to show us a rec2020 image. It was seamless integration.PB: 4K at 60fps is refreshing to see on this camera. How useful was this for the film and how did it perform?Andrew: We were really happy with how the 60-frame footage looked in post. I think it held up really nicely and being able to shoot high speed at 4K is a huge benefit at this point.Bryant: This was a very useful feature. We could easily switch right into 59.94 and then slow it down later in post. The image looks graceful and showed no signs of blocking or pattern issues. It performed quite well for us.PB: What types of projects do you see the Canon C200 excelling at?Bryant: The gear is only getting better. I see the C200 excelling in many different situations. You can use it on virtually anything as long as you can handle the data. They’ve kept the form factor small enough that you could throw a nice prime or even L series zoom on it and go rogue or you can build it out for a studio type configuration. The possibilities are almost endless. You can see in our BTS we had it in a few different configurations to achieve different shots, and that’s because of its small size.Andrew: The C200 offers a really high end look and color spectrum, while maintaining a relatively small footprint.  I can see using this on a variety of projects, especially those that want to balance the flexibility of a verité approach with more high-end, commercial cinematography.PB: Bryant, how did the C200 perform with skin tones and overall image quality?Bryant: Canon is known for their color science. They’ve certainly kept true to that with the C200. And that is only enhanced further with the RAW Light format. Having a 12bit image to push around later gives tremendous flexibility to achieve any kind of look you may want. We were going for something very natural and clean. We got that and some with this camera.PB: Bryant, I noticed you had a lot of gimbal shots in the film. How was the process of setting up the camera with the gimbal?Bryant: It was like setting up any other camera. The exciting thing about the C200 was its size and weight. It didn’t take very long to balance because it’s all conveniently packed into a small body. The gimbals we used had no trouble with it.PB: What surprised you the most about working with the Canon C200?Andrew: Honestly, my only pleasant surprise was that everything worked so well on the prototype camera.  I was so worried that we would get this un-tested camera out in the field and it just wouldn’t work.  Thankfully, I had nothing to worry about.  It all worked perfectly.Bryant: The most surprising thing to me was the level of detail the camera captures especially with the RAW Light format. When you see the image for yourself on a proper display, it’s really stunning. It’s refreshing to see the level of color and soft sharpness (if that makes sense) this camera delivers.How do you feel about the new C200? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more