Arsenal v Fulham line-ups: Hangeland starts, Arsenal man passed fit

first_imgFulham skipper Brede Hangeland, who was assessed after returning to action in midweek, has been passed fit to face Arsenal. Nacho Monreal starts for the Gunners after recovering from a foot injury.Arsenal: Szczesny, Sagna, Mertesacker, Koscielny, Monreal, Flamini, Wilshere, Cazorla, Gnabry, Ozil, Giroud.Subs: Fabianski, Jenkinson, Gibbs, Rosicky, Podolski, Oxlade-Chamberlain, Ju-Young Park.Fulham Stekelenburg; Riether, Burn, Hangeland, Richardson; Dejagah, Sidwell, Parker, Kacaniklic; Dempsey, Berbatov.Subs: Stockdale, Riise, Kasami, Karagounis, Duff, Hughes, Bent.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Keynote address by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa at the 2015 EY Strategic Growth Forum on Africa

first_imgJohanneburg, 3 November, 2015 – At the 2015 EY Strategic Growth Forum on Africa, South Africa’s deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa said that if companies want to expand into Africa, they would need to understand that the continent is diverse and that growth strategies need to be tailored according to each country’s needs.South African deputy president, Cyril RamaphosaProgramme Director,EY Chief Executive Officer Ajen Sita,Ladies and Gentlemen,Thank you for inviting me to officially open the EY Strategic Growth Forum, a valuable platform for engagement on the challenges and opportunities in Africa.This Forum is an acknowledgement that Africa’s growth and development narrative is changing.It is an acknowledgment that while we appreciate many of the difficulties, we have not sufficiently explored the possibilities.The programme for this Forum seeks to look beyond conventional wisdom. You will most probably during the course of this conference be looking at what I regard as mega-trends that are unfolding and influencing a great deal of things that are happening in the world.The programme for this Forum is therefore quite exciting.It is a fresh approach that is reflective, evidence-based and forward-looking.It acknowledges that human progress depends on social interactions, better coordination of responses and shared responsibility.It is an approach that allows us all to take ownership of our common future.Ladies and Gentlemen,To do business well in Africa today requires more than traditional economic analysis.It requires an understanding that Africa is a very diverse continent, with a vast array of different social structures, political systems, economies, products and markets.For this reason, there is no single African growth story.And no business that seeks to operate across the continent can pursue a single African growth strategy.Africa is simply too large and too diverse.Yet, despite all this variety, most African economies share common features.Most are reliant on the extraction and export of raw materials.Most are constrained by inadequate infrastructure, low skills levels and limited industrial capacity.This exposes many African economies to fluctuations in commodity prices and depressed global demand.The lack of industrial capacity means that many African countries are unable to extract sufficient value from their natural resources.They are not able to realise the potential benefits for job creation, improved export earnings and inclusive growth.That is the part of the African story we know well.But the African story is changing.Africa’s future depends not so much on the rise of commodity prices but on the expansion and development of its human capital.A continent of over a billion people, Africa is said to have the fastest-growing middle class in the world.Opportunities that were not available a mere generation ago, are now within reach of millions more people.More Africans are educated, more are employed, more own assets.Africa has a young and rapidly expanding workforce.Over the next few decades, as many other countries grapple with the challenges of an ageing workforce, Africa has the potential to become the most vibrant, innovative and productive region in the world.But to achieve this potential, African countries – individually and collectively – need to pursue deliberate political, social and economic measures.Many of these measures are described in the African Union’s Agenda 2063.And many of them are being implemented.Even as many economies still rely on commodity exports, there is significant investment in other sectors.The growth in retail banking, telecommunications, information technology, niche and finished goods has been remarkable.African economies are becoming more diverse, more industrialised and more innovative.Today a large proportion of transfers in foreign currency are not carried out through the international banks, but through mobile money remittances from the African diaspora.Several African airlines, led by the likes of Kenya Airways and Ethiopian Airlines, are becoming more commercial viable, investing in new aircraft, opening up new routes and increasing intra-Africa commerce and trade.In countries like Nigeria and Kenya, even with limited internet connectivity, innovative technological solutions are improving the lives of rural communities.Cellphone-based technologies are revolutionising the practice of medicine.Thanks to apps being developed on this continent, a health worker at a rural clinic can refer an issue for specialist diagnosis, in real time, by simply taking a cellphone photo of a patient’s eye.African economies have both the potential and ability to leapfrog advanced economies in developing technologies suitable for local conditions and needs.Economic change in Africa is taking place alongside political change.Governments are increasingly concerned with need for stability as a precondition for economic growth and social development.African countries are more united than ever before in promoting good governance, regional integration and multilateralism.Through our work in the African Union we are steadily establishing an integrated community that values accountability, good governance and transparency.Through a strong peer review mechanism we are seeing less conflict.With some notable exceptions, changes in government take place through the ballot box and not through the barrel of a gun.More than ever Africa is resolving its challenges through mediation, peace and dialogue.African countries are working hard to transform their economies.Governments are supporting programmes that promote manufacturing and competitiveness.They are encouraging new growth opportunities by investing in economic and social infrastructure.Importantly, African countries are collaborating on cross-border infrastructure projects that foster greater integration and trade.Many of these fall under the auspices of the Presidential Infrastructure Championing Initiative headed by President Jacob Zuma.This initiative is providing political leadership to projects such as the trans-Saharan highway between Algeria and Nigeria, the Grand Inga Dam in the DRC, and the North-South Corridor in Southern Africa.At a national level – in South Africa – we are undertaking a massive infrastructure investment programme overseen by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission.It is improving the capacity of our economy through better roads, ports, railways, electricity generation capacity and water infrastructure.It is improving people’s lives through new hospitals, clinics, schools and bus rapid transit systems.It is part of a broader economic strategy that seeks to grow the economy by increasing investment in productive economic sectors like manufacturing, agriculture.Central to the economic future of our country is the development of the skills of its people.Nowhere has the impact of apartheid been more keenly felt than in education.By depriving generations of black South Africans of a decent education, the apartheid government sought to deny them and their descendants a prosperous future.We have allocated R640 billion to basic education over the next three years. Much of this will go to improving school infrastructure, ensuring all learners receive suitable learning materials, and improving teacher training.We have significantly expanded access to higher education, and have increased the funding available to poor students through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).The amount disbursed annually by NSFAS has grown by approximately 270% since 2008, and is budgeted to grow even further in the next few years.But what has been made very clear by events over the last few weeks is that the funding of higher education remains a critical problem.We need to ensure that no-one is excluded from higher education because of an inability to pay.At the same time, we need to find funding mechanisms that are sustainable and ensure a high quality of education.We should therefore welcome the decision that the Presidential task team established to look at funding higher education will now be broadened to look at other issues of transformation in the sector.This is a matter of great urgency and great consequence.No country has managed to achieve what we are seeking to achieve without affordable, accessible, quality higher education.Through their actions, the students of South Africa have, quite correctly, underlined this critical imperative.As a country, we must now move with speed and purpose to address these fundamental issues of access, transformation and quality outcomes.Ladies and Gentlemen, there are many ways to describe Africa’s recent progress and the expectations that many have of its imminent economic and social emergence.During the course of this Forum we can expect that these descriptions will be scrutinised and enriched and enhanced.I would now like to turn to what I referred to in my opening remarks as mega-trends that business needs to address and pay attention to.EY has produced a report setting out five mega trends, to which I have added my own five.  The 10 trends are:1. Shared value;2. Regional integration;3. Infrastructure development;4. Entrepreneurship;5. Partnership;6. The level of consciousness of the people of the world is rising; people are becoming more discerning and are not prepared to accept shoddy service;7. Growth of the middle class, and on the African continent in particular;8. People’s demand for good governance;9. Innovation, particularly the grasp of technology in Africa10. Hope for the future: people are more hopeful about the future; (even) when they protest, they are doing so to secure a better future.I would like to conclude with what I consider to be one of the most compelling accounts of what we are witnessing in Africa today.It was written over a century ago by Pixley ka Isaka Seme.He said:“The brighter day is rising upon Africa. Already I seem to see her chains dissolved, her desert plains red with harvest, her Abyssinia and her Zululand the seats of science and religion, reflecting the glory of the rising sun from the spires of their churches and universities.“Her Congo and her Gambia whitened with commerce, her crowded cities sending forth the hum of business, and all her sons employed in advancing the victories of peace-greater and more abiding than the spoils of war.“Yes, the regeneration of Africa belongs to this new and powerful period!”I thank you.last_img read more

U.S. DoD needs “immediate action” to win the AI war

first_imgThe Department of Defense (DOD) Science Board has released a broad study on autonomy, recommending “immediate action” to counter enemy artificial intelligence.In the study, the science board found that commercial and academic AI is moving at a faster speed than military operations. It warned that if this continued, the U.S. military may face the same threats from adversaries that used cyber warfare to extract information from the Pentagon and other high value military targets, but on a much grander scale.See Also: BAE Systems debuts wearable charging tactical vest“For years, it has been clear that certain countries could, and most likely would, develop the technology to use cyber and electronic warfare against U.S. forces,” said the study’s authors. “Yet most of the U.S. effort focused on developing offensive cyber capabilities without commensurate attention to hardening U.S. systems against attacks from others.”“Unfortunately, in both domains, that neglect has resulted in DoD spending large sums of money today to ‘patch’ systems against potential attacks.”It advised the DOD to gather intelligence on other nation’s AI developments, especially China and Russia. Once it has found sufficient data, teams at the DOD should develop “counter-autonomy” solutions and ways to overwhelm the system, says the science board.DoD late out of the blocks with adversariesThe DOD should also invest resources into developing learning AI systems that can be deployed onto the battlefield. These systems could recognize weaknesses in the enemy’s defense or strategy, though self-thinking systems are far away from becoming reality.China and Russia are both supposedly developing AI systems to deploy on the battlefield. China has even boasted about AI robots and autonomous tanks, which could be deployed in the next few years.According to the report, China has an advantage in the AI battle, since it does not have the same worries that a truly self-thinking system could cause catastrophic damage if it goes rogue. That could be a massive disadvantage, if the U.S. or any other nation is able to create programs to attack the AI and manipulate it.DARPA, the research and development wing of the DOD, has ran a few autonomous tests in the past decade. It could be influential in finding engineers and startups to shore up the U.S. AI deficiencies. What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … How Myia Health’s Partnership with Mercy Virtua… Related Posts Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfacescenter_img Tags:#AI#artificial intelligence#DoD#featured#Internet of Things#IoT#military#Pentagon#robots#top Follow the Puck David Currylast_img read more

Opportunity Lifespans Are Measured in Dog Years

first_imgI know that you love your opportunity. You’ve had this opportunity for a long, long time. You were thrilled when you got it, and you rushed back to the office to enter it into your pipeline. You spent a lot of time with your then new opportunity, and you helped it to grow and mature.But opportunities don’t age well. They don’t live as long as humans. You aren’t that much older than when you first found your opportunity, but your opportunity has grown to be quite old. The longer an opportunity lives in your pipeline, the more certain it is that the opportunity has serious health problems. It is no longer a healthy opportunity.I know that you love this opportunity. He’s like an old friend, a trusted companion. You have had all kinds of adventures together. You have lots of cute and funny stories about you and your opportunity. Each day when you open up your sales force automation software, your opportunity is there, waiting for you, protecting you from an otherwise too shallow pipeline.But you aren’t going to be able to keep your opportunity for your whole adult life. There comes a time when you have to part with your old opportunity. It’s old, its health has failed, and you have to let it go. You’ve only been keeping this opportunity alive because you can’t stand to part with it. You can’t imagine your life without your special opportunity. But it’s time to say goodbye and finally part with your opportunity.It’s sad. It hurts. I know.But this doesn’t have to be the end of the story. Over time, the pain will subside, and life will go on. I know nothing will ever replace your special opportunity, but you can go and find another opportunity. Many of your dream clients are suffering from neglect and abuse. They need a good home. You can go out and get yourself a new one.If you want to keep an opportunity forever, make sure you help it grow into a client. That’s the only way you get to keep it.QuestionsWhy don’t opportunities age well?What kind of health problems do old opportunities typically suffer from as they age?How do you know when an opportunity is no longer really an opportunity?Why do some salespeople struggle to part with old opportunities that aren’t ever going to result in a deal? Get the Free eBook! Learn how to sell without a sales manager. Download my free eBook! You need to make sales. You need help now. We’ve got you covered. This eBook will help you Seize Your Sales Destiny, with or without a manager. Download Nowlast_img read more

UNP changes the constitution to give Sri Lanka an executive Presidency

first_imgWhen the United National Party (UNP) entered the final year of its Parliamentary term on July 23, even its most sanguine supporters conceded that the first five years had taken a heavy toll of its once heady popularity. In this fiercely politicised electorate, psephology is second cousin to astrology and,When the United National Party (UNP) entered the final year of its Parliamentary term on July 23, even its most sanguine supporters conceded that the first five years had taken a heavy toll of its once heady popularity. In this fiercely politicised electorate, psephology is second cousin to astrology and every man is his own opinion poller and pundit. Election forecasting is already an exciting and inexpensive national sport.If the electoral mood is distinctly ‘oppositional’, the opposition leadership is manifestly disoriented and dispirited. Not wholly of their own doing, this is the cumulative result of many finely calculated moves by President J.R. Jayawardene in his determined bid to break the familiar pattern of Sri Lanka politics, the in-out pendulum swing between the two main contenders, and the discontinuity in policy, chiefly economic policy.Using its four-fifths majority, the UNP changed the constitution to give the island an executive Presidency, introduced proportional representation (PR) with an unusually high cut-off point (12.5 per cent), and led an unprecedented frontal attack on the Opposition by depriving its formidable rival Mrs Bandaranaike of her civic rights for seven years. However, popular predictions hold that only the evident advantages of the PR system in conjunction with a fragmented Opposition can possibly give the UNP the largest number of seats in the next 196-member Parliament. In the circumstances, even a simple majority is considered doubtful.Strong Executive: Jayawardene’s proclaimed aim was a strong, stable executive, able to take “the hard unpopular decisions” necessary to escape the welfare system, an essential linchpin of Sri Lanka’s uniquely resilient democracy. An uncertain blessing, the “open economy” has the full backing of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank and the Sri Lanka Aid Group. The object of the exercise, the Opposition says, was merely the perpetuation of the party and the President in power.advertisement On its own, the right wing UNP has the strongest support base – an almost irreducible third of the national electorate. Only a Centre-Left alliance between the middle-of-the-road Sri Lanka Freedom Party (SLFP) and the traditional Left has been able, in recent years, to defeat the UNP. Now that alliance is in tatters.Yet the ruling party leadership senses a sullen, probably hostile electorate which has a notorious legacy of “throwing the rascals out” even when it has not been too enamoured of the alternative. The mass mood is a product of larger social and economic discontent. In his anniversary address and first formal TV appearance, President Jayawardene said that 50 per cent of Sri Lankans still earn only Rs 300 a month. The shops are full but the old system of subsidised essentials, despite the vexations of ration cards and queues at cooperatives, continues.Restricted Benefit: So far the benefits of the UNP’S faith in the ‘open economy’ and “the trickle down” theory have been reaped largely by the business community and the old propertied and privileged strata.Javawardene (left) and Bandaranaike: Picking up the piecesThe real rewards, the UNP argues, of the major projects (the Mahaveli diversion, the huge construction programme, the trade zones) will spread to the lower income groups in a few years. In an effort at ensuring a second term to reap the benefit of this delayed effect, the new August 3 constitutional amendment will enable Jayawardene to hold a Presidential poll even before the Parliamentary elections which are due by July next. Evidently he favours his own chances in single combat. If he wins, his party’s chances will probably improve. The move has made the Opposition disarray even more public. First to enter the list of contenders was Maitripala Senanayake, MP, long-time deputy of Mrs Bandaranaike, who now leads a rival faction which he claims is the “legitimate SLEP” Then came Dr Colvin R. de Silva, the leader of the socialist (formerly Trotskyist) LSSP (Lanka Sama Samaja Party).Next, with the Tamil United Liberation Front (TULF) not contesting the Presidency, was the very much smaller Tamil Congress (TC) which nominated its leader G.G. Ponnambalam Jr, a token Tamil contender. All eyes, however, were on Mrs Bandaranaike’s SLFP. The party’s central committee met on August 6 and Hector Kobbekaduwe, an ex-minister, was heavily tipped as the SLFP choice. He is backed by a radical, pro-China group led by Mrs Bandaranaike’s younger daughter, Chandrika Kumaratunge. However, Mrs Bandaranaike, sensitive to charges of favouritism, would be reluctant to nominate Kobbekaduwe who is her cousin.Consensus Candidate: Mrs Bandaranaike, the communists, the socialists and smaller left parties are in search of a “common candidate” to take on Jayawardene. Dr Colvin R. de Silva, a classmate of Jayawardene and a brilliant lawyer, is widely favoured.advertisementHe has two disqualifications: his Marxist politics and his caste. With the majority Sinhala-Buddhist vote quite evenly divided between the traditional rivals, the support of the minorities (Tamil, Christians, Muslims and Indian plantation labour) is a key factor. In the calculus of Presidential contests, such “block votes” could be vital. Since last year’s racial troubles, Jayawardene has taken a firm line of “racial-religious harmony”. Though he has paid great personal attention to Buddhist affairs, the UNP’S apparent solicitude for the minorities has aroused Sinhala-Buddhist chauvinism. A Colombo meeting of a new Sinhala-Buddhist organisation, launched by a group of monks and lay leaders, was attacked by a gang of intruders whom Opposition MP’S branded as pro-UNP goons. One of those injured was Professor Ediriweera Saratchandra, well-known playwright and former ambassador to Paris. He has been writing pamphlets and making speeches denouncing the new Singapore-style consumerism as an attack on the Buddhist value system. He appeared on Mrs Bandaranaike’s platform last month.Communal Violence: The anniversary week ended on an inauspicious note. Racial disturbances in Galle, the southern province capital, forced the Government to declare an Emergency, introduce censorship and impose a curfew in the area. Galle has a strong concentration of Muslims, traditionally a trading community monopolising the prosperous gem business. A quarrel over a parrot, a fight between a Muslim landlord and a Sinhalese tenant, and a Sinhalese schoolboy mistaken for a Muslim and assaulted, formed the familiar chain reactions of communal violence. There were two deaths, and several cases of arson. While the situation is now calm, the Government is investigating the possible involvement of “opposition elements”.last_img read more

Mining and Quarrying Top-Performing Sector

first_img The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) is reporting that mining and quarrying grew by an estimated 25.5 per cent from January to March 2018, to emerge as the top-performing sector over the quarter, compared to the corresponding period last year. The Planning Institute of Jamaica (PIOJ) is reporting that mining and quarrying grew by an estimated 25.5 per cent from January to March 2018, to emerge as the top-performing sector over the quarter, compared to the corresponding period last year.Director General, Dr. Wayne Henry, said the sector’s out-turn, to a large extent, spurred the goods producing industry’s estimated three per cent growth over the review period, which also saw the services industry growing by approximately 0.7 per cent.Dr. Henry was speaking at the PIOJ’s quarterly media briefing at the agency’s New Kingston head office on Tuesday (May 22).He said the mining and quarrying sector’s out-turn resulted from a 28.7 per cent increase in bauxite production. This, he pointed out, reflected higher alumina and crude bauxite production.“Alumina production was 27.1 per cent higher, reflecting the resumption of productive activity at the JISCO-Alpart alumina refinery since October to December 2017. Crude bauxite production grew by 27.7 per cent due to more conducive weather conditions,” he explained.Other sectors under the goods producing industry recording growth were construction, up 1.5 per cent; manufacturing, up one per cent; and agriculture, forestry and fishing, 0.5 per cent.Dr. Henry said growth in the building construction component was due to an increase in residential and non-residential developments, reflecting a 286.6 per cent increase in housing starts by public institutions to 1,527 units, of which the National Housing Trust (NHT) accounted for 1,512 units.Additionally, he said there was an increase in the volume and value of NHT mortgages by 6.2 per cent and 10.9 per cent, respectively.“The estimated growth in the ‘other component’ (of the construction sector) was facilitated by higher capital expenditure recorded by the National Works Agency, which disbursed $3 billion on the construction and rehabilitation of roads, relative to $2.2 billion in the corresponding quarter of 2017; Jamaica Public Service, which disbursed $1.7 billion, relative to $890 million (last year); and the Port Authority of Jamaica, which disbursed $1.1 billion, up from $624.5 million,” the Director General said.Meanwhile, hotels and restaurants, with an estimated 1.6 per cent out-turn, was the dominant sector under the services industry.This out-turn was spurred by a 6.6 per cent increase in arrivals, to 1,298,674 visitors. This was reflected in stopover arrivals, up 6.8 per cent, and cruise passenger arrivals, up 65 per cent.Dr. Henry also indicated that visitor expenditure is estimated to have grown by 8.5 per cent to US$825.3 million.He pointed out that the out-turn for 2017/18 fiscal year growth was estimated at 0.8 per cent, with the goods producing industry recording 0.3 per cent and services, 0.9 per cent.The industries recording the largest growth were mining and quarrying, up 4.7 per cent; hotels and restaurants, up four per cent; construction, 1.2 per cent; and manufacturing, 1.1 per cent.Dr. Henry said the growth prospects for April to June 2018 quarter are “generally positive” based on the anticipated strengthening of the performance of most industries, relative to the similar quarter of 2017.“Baseline economic growth is expected to be in the range of 1.5 per cent to 2.5 per cent,” he indicated. Story Highlights Dr. Henry said growth in the building construction component was due to an increase in residential and non-residential developments, reflecting a 286.6 per cent increase in housing starts by public institutions to 1,527 units, of which the National Housing Trust (NHT) accounted for 1,512 units. Dr. Henry said the growth prospects for April to June 2018 quarter are “generally positive” based on the anticipated strengthening of the performance of most industries, relative to the similar quarter of 2017.last_img read more

Duchess Of Cornwall Visits UNICEF Projects In Serbia

first_imgHer Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall travelled with UNICEF this week to visit a centre in Belgrade, Serbia, which is supporting vulnerable children and their families.On her visit, The Duchess of Cornwall met children and their families supported by the centre, which is also supported by The Novak Djokovic Foundation. She met those living in extreme poverty or with mental health illnesses or disabilities as well as family outreach workers who are empowering parents to look after their children in healthy environments, keep them safe and avoid the risk of them being placed in institutions.The centre works to keep families together and teams also support parents whose children are returning home after time spent in foster care. They ensure the family’s reunion is successful and the child returns to a safe and stable environment.On her visit to the UNICEF supported centre, The Duchess of Cornwall met with families who spoke to her about their experiences and the invaluable and life changing help they receive. One mother emphasised how important this centre is to her and her family and the difference it’s made to their futures.UNICEF UK Executive Director, David Bull, said: “We are thrilled that The Duchess of Cornwall took time in her two-day visit to Serbia to meet vulnerable families supported by Unicef in Serbia. Unicef is working to keep families together and help keep more children safe and protected.”Speaking on behalf of his Foundation and as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, Novak Djokovic said in a video message to the Duchess of Cornwall: “I want to thank The Duchess of Cornwall for deciding to visit families from the project Families at Risk, jointly implemented by the Government of Serbia, UNICEF and the Novak Djokovic Foundation.This project is of great importance for all of us because it focuses on empowering families, and strong families are the pillars of every society.“We cannot have happy, playful and inquisitive children without providing them with a safe environment in which they can grow, play and develop. My family was my safe haven while I was growing up and this fact alone helped me to become the man I am today. Now, both my wife and I wish to provide the same nurturing environment to our son.

“So far, 400 families and children have passed through this project and all of them have said that their family outreach worker helped them to strengthen their parenting skills and to enhance relationships in the family; in essence that they made them feel better and safer.“Some of the families were fortunate enough, for the first time, to celebrate their children’s birthdays together, others were never again separated from each other; many children improved their school grades because they could come back home to loving and caring parents.”The Duchess of Cornwall visited UNICEF’s programmes as part of a visit to the Western Balkans alongside The Prince of Wales from 14th- 19th March 2016.last_img read more