‘Pollen bomb’ to hit Donegal over Easter weekend

first_imgAsthma and hay fever sufferers are being warned of a potentially deadly “pollen bomb” which could cause life-threatening attacks this weekend. Met Eireann’s pollen count forecast is showing high levels over the coming days as Ireland is set to scorch over the Easter holidays.The national forecaster warned: “With dry, settled and increasingly warm temperatures over the next few days the tree pollen risk will rise to high across all regions.” And the weekend will see spells of sunshine which will bring the mercury into the 20s.Sarah O’Connor, CEO of the Asthma Society of Ireland said: “Project pollen levels are high in coming days and, with pollen levels rising earlier than last year, people with hayfever really need to start managing the condition now, especially those with hayfever and asthma.“80 per cent of people with asthma also have hayfever. We have lots of information on asthma.ie on minimising hay fever symptoms for asthma patients, which for some people can cause a fatal asthma attack.“Hayfever is very misunderstood in Ireland and people often dismiss you as a hypochondriac or simply a complainer when you mention it. “As a hayfever sufferer, I can testify that it is a very debilitating condition that leaves you feeling really miserable and unwell.“The constant runny nose, itchy eyes and sneezing are extremely distracting, and the accompanying headache and fatigue have always really marked out the summer months for me. For me, it felt like a flu all summer long.”“Some tips to help prevent and/or reduce symptoms, include: keep windows closed in your bedroom at night, remaining indoors as much as possible, staying away from grassy areas, and putting Vaseline around your nostrils to trap pollen.“One person dies every five days here as a result of their asthma.”‘Pollen bomb’ to hit Donegal over Easter weekend was last modified: April 20th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Fog harvesting in the E Cape

first_imgWe recently installed a Fog Harvesting system in the Alfred Nzo District Municipality at a place called Cabazana.The experience was mindblowing. Although at this stage fog occurances are low (seasonal), local residents who are to benefit from this and will for the first time be able to drink potable water when the fog starts rolling in (September – April).Congrats to the Mayor and his council for caring for the people even if it means using innovative methods.This country can only get better if all of us took as much care and cut out the RED TAPE and just made it happen.View full story Engineering News, Innovative ‘Fog Harvesting’ system installed in the Eastern Cape.Story submitted to SAinfo on 1 July 2008last_img read more

‘La vita’ looks ‘bella’ for Debora Patta

first_imgFrom left to right, IWW award winnersFerdinando Pezzoli, Lara Mazzoni, DeboraPatta, Tiziana Grassi, Marco Folegani,and Elena Maria Teresa Calligaro.(Image: IWW) MEDIA CONTACTS • Michelle KirbyE.tv Head of Marketing+27 11 537 9300RELATED ARTICLES• Media awards for SA women• Rhodes hosts world journalism meet• The media and open justice• Jacob Zuma on press freedom• Turning up the media volumeFiona McRae“La vita”, it would appear, is pretty “bella” right now for South African television journalist and media personality Debora Patta.Not only did the Zimbabwe-born anchor and executive producer of e.tv’s hard-hitting investigative programme 3rd Degree add yet another award to her collection last month, but she seems to be revelling in a career decision of a year ago to free up some time so as to be able to concentrate more fully on her “two real passions”: journalism and her family. Happily married to her second husband, Patta is the mother of two young daughters.And it would seem that, like many women her age, the 40-something Patta is discovering the liberation and confidence that the years can bring.“The best thing about this age is no longer caring what other people think of you,” she is quoted as saying in a recent edition of a fashion chain’s club magazine. “I’ve learnt not to be so hung up on people who don’t like you.”The fact that the apparently always self-assured and assertive Patta has ever lacked confidence might well come as a surprise to 3rd Degree viewers who have seen her courageously and tenaciously hold those in positions of power and responsibility to account.Famous for her tough, no-nonsense approach she has had heads of state, politicians, business leaders and many others in the hot seat on the show in the decade that it has been in existence – but has also told the stories of the ordinary person in the street with compassion.Patta has featured high-profile figures such as African National Congress Youth League president Julius Malema, the late political leader Eugene Terre’Blanche who, she says, is the only person to have walked out of an interview, businessman Cyril Ramaphosa, President Jacob Zuma, axed Ekurhuleni police chief Robert McBride, and former president Thabo Mbeki.Winning formula Patta’s unrelenting pursuit of not only answers but also excellence in a journalism career spanning two decades has garnered her respect and recognition stretching beyond the country’s borders. Already the winner of multiple accolades, including a 2010 South Africa’s Most Influential Women in Business and Government category award and the 2009 Vodacom Women in the Media award, Patta was honoured by the Italian Women in the World (IWW) association last month when she received a Tricolor Globe Award at a ceremony held in Bologna, Italy.The IWW is a global networking association. Its awards recognise the achievements of men and women of Italian origins, or of Italians working abroad or in Italy for other countries, who have attained outstanding career success within “creative and innovative global industries” such as communication and events; art and design; performing arts; alternative energies and recyclable products; information and communication technologies; science, research, technology and engineering; and tourism.Six achievers from Asia, Africa, South America and Europe were recognised in this year’s awards. Patta was honoured for her “achievements, excellence and contribution to society in the communications field in Africa”.The main goal of the award, according to IWW founder and president Patrizia Angelini, “is to promote the important role of compatriots and other Italians who work abroad, through the spreading of personal success stories and highlighting the cultural and entrepreneurial effort.”Angelini, a television journalist for Italian broadcasting corporation RAI International, founded the association in 2007 after her work brought her into contact with the larger Italian community around the world and she conceived the idea of creating a network to facilitate their international communication.The awards project, which has the support of the Italian government, is active in promoting the “excellence, enterprise and beauty” of Italy and its culture and the Made in Italy brand internationally. This is done through on-line and television information and through events including seminars, international awards and intercultural exchanges.“It is a great honour to be recognised by my country of origin,” said Patta, who owes her Italian heritage to her Calabrian father. “I am extremely proud of my Italian roots, so this is very exciting.”Patta has previously said that while South Africa is where her heart is, Italy is indeed her second home. And like most good Italians, she loves cooking “fabulous Italian food” and relaxing with family, friends and a glass of fine wine.Team effortAlways mindful of the team effort required for the success of the current affairs show that draws close to 2-million viewers, she said: “It is also a great tribute to 3rd Degree and e.tv as they are regarded as making a significant contribution in Africa.”E.tv’s channel head Monde Twala paid tribute to Patta, saying that “Debora is a committed journalist and executive producer who continually aims to better and uplift society by exposing the truth and keeping the public informed. 3rd Degree has been successful for the past 10 years and e.tv congratulates Debora for her ongoing investigative success.”With a career of more than 20 years spanning radio, television and writing – she has co-authored two non-fiction books – Patta is one of the most prominent and respected journalists in South Africa, having reported fearlessly on virtually every major story in the country during that time. She became well known for her extensive coverage of Nelson Mandela from his release from prison to his election as South Africa’s first black head of state – the warm relationship they developed led to her being dubbed his favourite reporter.During her time with e.tv since its inception in 1998 Patta has trained, developed and mentored many budding young television journalists and news anchors. She also led the team that launched South Africa’s first 24-hour news service.Known for her no-holds-barred interviewing and for being unafraid to ask the tough questions, Patta maintains that she has never felt her achievements were limited because she is a woman. Indeed, in receiving the Vodacom Women in the Media award last year she had a strong message for young women: “Don’t just knock on the door, bash it down!”But she does acknowledge the sometimes harsh truth that “women are so often seen as aggressive while men doing the same thing are regarded as tough, assertive, uncompromising”.While Patta too has come under fire from those who feel her style of interviewing is too aggressive and not diplomatic enough, there is no doubt that she has brought many sinister cases to light, which might otherwise have continued to harm society.She admits that finding the balance between career and family can be a tough challenge – and one she handles better at some times than at others. She finds release from the pressures of her “adrenaline-all-the-way” job through “strong coping mechanisms, trying to stay healthy and a supportive family”. A year ago she resigned from the demanding position as editor-in-chief of eNews to be able to concentrate more fully on 3rd Degree and her two real loves, journalism and her family.“You can’t change the world, but you can make a difference to someone,” Patta has said. Over the years, the woman described as having “a unique front row in South Africa’s history” has done that many times over.last_img read more

Elections 2014: guide to voting, counting and objecting

first_imgDownload the app The IEC has designed an app especially for voters which allows you to check your registration details, find your voting station – and keep up to date via social media. 5 May 2014 South Africa goes to the polls on Wednesday – and many in the country who are too young to remember apartheid will be voting for the first time. According to the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC), more young South Africans have registered to vote in this election than ever before – with 49.57% of registered voters under 40 years old. The biggest segment of voters is those aged 30 to 39 (6.18-million), followed by 20- to 29-year-olds (5.7-million), the IEC says. As this new generation of voters prepare to join millions of their fellow South Africans at the polls on Wednesday, we answer a few last-minute questions.Are you ready? If you are a South African citizen 18 years or older and have registered to vote, remember:Voting stations are open from 7am to 9pm on Wednesday.You must vote where you registered. SMS your ID number to 32810 to confirm your correct voting station. SMSs cost R1. Or you can check your registration details on the IEC’s website.Take along your green bar-coded South African ID book, or a smart ID card, or your temporary identity certificate. Read more: All the election info, results via mobile appFind out where to download the IEC’s voters app Read more: New ballot paper for visually impaired voters The ballot papers An IEC official will give you two ballot papers that will be stamped on the back. One paper is for you to choose your preferred party for the National Assembly. The other paper is for you to choose your preferred party for the provincial legislature for the province in which you live. You do not have to fill in the same party on both ballot papers – you can choose different parties if you want. What information is on the ballot papers?The full name of each political partyThe abbreviated name or shortened name of each partyThe logo or symbol of each partyA photograph of each party leaderA blank space for you to indicate the party of your choice The voting process 1. Entrance: When you get to the entrance of the voting station, the door controller will tell you when it is your turn to enter. 2. ID Document: You will be directed to the voters’ roll table where IEC staff will look at your ID book or temporary ID certificate and check for your name on the voters’ roll. If you are not on the voters’ roll, but have proof that you have registered, such as a registration sticker, the presiding officer must validate your proof of registration. If the officer is satisfied with the proof, you will have to complete a VEC4 form (national elections) or MEC7 form (municipal elections) and will then be allowed to continue as an ordinary voter. 3. Inked thumb: IEC staff will ink your left thumb. This is special ink that will not wash off for several days. It will show everyone you participated (and prevent people from voting more than once). Your ID book will also be stamped to show you have voted. 4. Ballot paper: The voting officer will stamp the back of two official ballot papers (one for the national election; the other for the provincial election) and give them to you. 5. Voting booth: You will be directed to an empty voting booth. You will be alone in a voting booth. Your vote is your secret. Here, you will place your X in the box next to the political party of your choice on both ballot papers. Your vote does not have to be the same. Fold your papers and leave the voting booth. If you incorrectly mark a ballot paper and realise this before placing it in the ballot box, just ask the presiding officer for a new ballot paper. Make sure that the incorrect ballot paper is marked as “cancelled”. 6. Ballot box: Place your folded ballot papers into the right ballot box: one for national; the other for provincial votes. Once your ballot has been placed in the ballot box, it can’t be removed. 7. Exit: Make your way to the exit. Security staff will be there to help you.Physically disabled voters If you are physically disabled or visually impaired, you can choose someone to help you at the voting station. The Presiding Officer can also help you cast your vote, but an observer and, if available, two agents from different parties must be present. How do you make your mark? Make your mark in the box next to the party of your choice. Make only one mark per ballot paper. Your mark must not touch any of the walls/lines of the box. It is best to make a cross. If you make a mistake, do not put your paper in the box. Call an IEC official, who will cancel your paper and give you a new one. Once you have made your mark, fold each ballot paper in half. An IEC official will then check the stamp on the back of every ballot. You can then place your paper into the relevant boxes.The counting process The overall election results will be worked out using a computer system at centralised venues under the control of the IEC. Counting mostly happens at each voting station. Votes can be counted at a place other than at the voting station only with the approval of the IEC. Since the 2009 elections, there are improved controls over the record paper with the final results for a voting station. This has to be signed by the presiding officer and all political parties, and then scanned to create an immediate record and so more trust and openness in the process of compiling results.Explanation of the counting process 1. Verify: Accredited observers and party agents watch over the entire process, starting with the opening and emptying of the sealed ballot boxes. 2. Unfold: Each ballot is unfolded and the back is checked for a stamp. Ballots without stamps are not counted. 3. Sorted: The ballots are sorted into piles according to votes for each party. The counting officer must decide whether or not a questionable ballot paper (where it is not definitively clear which party has been voted for) should be counted or rejected. Party agents can dispute this. 4. Count and bundle: The ballots are counted and bundled into packs of 100. The results are then tallied for each party. 5. Reconcile and recount (if necessary): The results for the various parties are now reconciled against the total number of ballots. If the numbers do not match, there is a recount of all the votes. 6. Sign results slips and seal ballots: Results are recorded on to a results system that has automated quality controls to ensure accuracy of results. Results slips are signed by the counting officer and the party agents and are scanned to allow political parties to compare against recorded results. 7. Results centres: The results are posted on the door of the voting station and are also electronically sent to the national and nine provincial results centres where they are verified and collated. Independent external auditors audit this process. 8. Final results: The final results and seat allocations for national and provincial legislatures are announced by the chief electoral officer – usually within seven days of the election.Objections You can object against anything that happens during the elections that can affect the election results. You must make an objection before 5pm on the second day after voting. The IEC will investigate your objection and can ask you to give evidence about the objection. The IEC will decide what to do about the objection. The IEC must make a decision within three days after receiving your objection. If you are not happy with the IEC’s decision, you can appeal to the Electoral Court within three days of the IEC’s decision. After all objections are dealt with, the IEC must announce the final results within seven days of Election Day. In practice, the IEC has managed to announce election results on the third day after Voting Day. SAinfo reporter and Independent Electoral Commissionlast_img read more

Mowrystown FFA gets into the giving spirit this holiday season

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Mowrystown FFA hosted a school wide day of giving at Whiteoak Jr./Sr. High School on December 18th. Students had two different sessions to go to where they could either make tie blankets, assemble boxes of food, help decorate and fill bags for Totes for Hope, or watch a movie.By the end of the day the students had assembled about 30 blankets, 95 boxes of food, and about 25 bags for Totes for Hope. It was a fun and successful day of helping others and the Mowrystown FFA would like to thank everyone who helped and those who donated the material.last_img read more