ON THIS WEEKEND

first_imgSaturday7:45 a.m.: TOTTENHAM VS SUNDERLAND10 a.m.: CHELSEA VS EVERTON12:30 p.m.: ASTON VILLA VS LEICESTER7 p.m.: NEWCASTLE VS WEST HAMSunday9:05 a.m.: LIVERPOOL VS MAN UNITED11:15 a.m.: STOKE VS ARSENAL11:15 a.m: BOURNEMOUTH VS NORWICH Sunday4:30 p.m.: SOUTHAMPTON VS WEST BROMSPORTSMAX2 SPORTSMAXlast_img

Winless Raiders host Baker Mayfield in starting debut

first_imgYOU GOT WHAT IT TAKES?Pick against our pros all season long and win!***ALAMEDA — Here comes trouble.Baker Mayfield makes his first NFL start Sunday at the Coliseum against the Raiders, having energized a moribund franchise by coming off the bench to lead the Cleveland Browns to their first victory in 635 days.A surprise No. 1 overall draft pick, Mayfield’s size (6-foot-1, 215 pounds), production in a college spread offense at Oklahoma and a few behavioral glitches brought comparisons to …last_img read more

Air travel growth slows

first_imgGrowth in passenger and freight demand in the bellwether airline industry is slowing and industry officials warn that terrorism and the Brexit vote make it unlikely there will be an uptick any time soon.Total global passenger traffic was 4.6 per cent higher in May compared to the same month in 2015 but international passenger growth slowed for the third consecutive month to 4.3 per cent.The increase in global freight traffic was a lacklustre 0.9 per cent as growth flat-lined across all regions except Europe and the Middle East.  Air freight is a key indicator of global economic health.“Global trade has basically moved sideways since the end of 2014 taking air cargo with it,’’  said International Air Transport Association director general Tony Tyler. “Hopes for a stronger 2016 are fading as economic and political uncertainty increases. Air cargo is vital to the global economy but the business environment is extremely difficult and there are few signs of any immediate relief.’’The important  Asia-pacific market, which accounts 38.9 per cent of global air freight market, entered negative territory with a May fall of 0.7 per cent compared to 12 months ago and cargo holds that averaged just over half full.Latin America was hardest hit with freight tonne kilometres down 9.7 per cent and even the normally vibrant Middle East market reported a modest rise of 3.2 per cent.A regional breakdown of May international passenger traffic painted a rosier picture but a 5.1 per cent rise in Asia-Pacific traffic was outstripped by a 6.4 per cent increase in capacity and IATA said the strong upward momentum of recent months had stalled.The Middle East carriers again led the field with an 11.8 per cent increase followed by Africa at 9.5 per cent. Latin America recorded growth of 5.1 per cent, while Europe turned in an increase of 2.1 per cent to leave North America last at 0.5 per cent.Domestic demand was up 5.1 per cent globally but Australian, Brazilian, Russian and Japanese airlines all cut capacity in the face of falling or negligible growth. Australian domestic capacity was down 2.9 per cent on growth of 0.4 per cent while capacity in Brazil fell 8.1 per cent as traffic contracted 7.7 percent.Mr Tyler blamed a combination of factors for a slip in passenger demand growth to more historic levels after a strong start to the year.“These include continuing terrorist activity and the fragile state of the global economy,’’ he said. “ Neither bode well for travel demand. And the shocks of Istanbul and the economic fallout of the Brexit vote make it difficult to see an early uptick.’’last_img read more

Interview: The First Filmmakers to Shoot with the Canon C200

first_imgGet insights from the director and DP behind Canon’s From Dock to Dish.Images via Canon Pro.When the Canon C200 was first announced, the camera manufacturer released the short documentary, From Dock to Dish. We had the chance to interview Director Andrew Fried and Director of Photography Bryant Fisher to discuss their experience shooting and working with the Canon C200. Here’s what we learned.PB: Andrew Fried, From Dock to Dish is a beautiful film. Why did you gravitate toward this concept to highlight the new features of the Canon C200?Andrew: Over the last few years, I have had the distinct privilege to spend time filming in some of the best restaurants in the world. I’ve been consumed lately with the idea that so many people come to these restaurants, enjoy such a special experience and loft such high praise about the food that they’ve eaten, but rarely look past their plate to truly consider all of the people that have played a role in bringing this food to their table. That was the seed of the idea here: to see the entire process and everyone who is truly involved from start to finish.PB: Bryant Fisher, the concept behind “From Dock to Dish” features a lot of different lighting scenarios. What was it like to know you’d be testing and challenging this new camera in a variety of scenarios?Bryant: This was an exciting challenge to me. I’ve used Canon cameras in the past and know they hold up in well in all kinds of scenarios. I wanted to see what Canon packed into this new camera to handle those kinds of scenarios even better. The C200 gave us a very rich image with hardly any help in front of the lens. It felt very consistent and natural with its color and exposure handling.PB: The Cinema RAW Light is an exciting new feature. Why was this a valuable tool for you and for other filmmakers?Bryant: The Cinema RAW Light format is a big step forward for Canon. I think it speaks largely to where they are putting their focus. I hope they implement this format in all of their cinema cameras down the line. You are getting a 12bit 4K image at around 1gbps data rate. Thats an enormous amount of information to capture, but they’ve managed to get it to 1/3-1/5 the size of typical RAW. This is exciting and empowering to filmmakers because for the first time, you have this format as a real option at a relatively low price point. For us, it only strengthened our film to help illustrate the colorful journey of our fish.PB: How was working with the Canon ecosystem of products from the camera to the lenses and monitors?Andrew: As a filmmaker, we each have our own set of gear that we like to bring out with us in the field. Generally, it’s pieced together from things made by different manufacturers, and often it can be a challenge for the camera team to “make it all work together.” Going out with only Canon gear actually made it a whole lot easier in the field. As much as we all hold on to the tools that we have always worked with, the Canon lenses actually do complement the Canon camera nicely, and having the Canon monitor with us out in the field was really beneficial. The pieces all do actually want to work together, which at the very least, makes the AC’s day a whole lot more efficient.Bryant: It is exactly that. An ecosystem. Canon seems to be focusing on capturing quality in the image and its evident through the whole pipeline. The lenses work well and interact with their cameras. The images display very well on their monitors. We sent an ungraded LOG 3 image to their 2420 Reference Display, and it debayered that signal to show us a rec2020 image. It was seamless integration.PB: 4K at 60fps is refreshing to see on this camera. How useful was this for the film and how did it perform?Andrew: We were really happy with how the 60-frame footage looked in post. I think it held up really nicely and being able to shoot high speed at 4K is a huge benefit at this point.Bryant: This was a very useful feature. We could easily switch right into 59.94 and then slow it down later in post. The image looks graceful and showed no signs of blocking or pattern issues. It performed quite well for us.PB: What types of projects do you see the Canon C200 excelling at?Bryant: The gear is only getting better. I see the C200 excelling in many different situations. You can use it on virtually anything as long as you can handle the data. They’ve kept the form factor small enough that you could throw a nice prime or even L series zoom on it and go rogue or you can build it out for a studio type configuration. The possibilities are almost endless. You can see in our BTS we had it in a few different configurations to achieve different shots, and that’s because of its small size.Andrew: The C200 offers a really high end look and color spectrum, while maintaining a relatively small footprint.  I can see using this on a variety of projects, especially those that want to balance the flexibility of a verité approach with more high-end, commercial cinematography.PB: Bryant, how did the C200 perform with skin tones and overall image quality?Bryant: Canon is known for their color science. They’ve certainly kept true to that with the C200. And that is only enhanced further with the RAW Light format. Having a 12bit image to push around later gives tremendous flexibility to achieve any kind of look you may want. We were going for something very natural and clean. We got that and some with this camera.PB: Bryant, I noticed you had a lot of gimbal shots in the film. How was the process of setting up the camera with the gimbal?Bryant: It was like setting up any other camera. The exciting thing about the C200 was its size and weight. It didn’t take very long to balance because it’s all conveniently packed into a small body. The gimbals we used had no trouble with it.PB: What surprised you the most about working with the Canon C200?Andrew: Honestly, my only pleasant surprise was that everything worked so well on the prototype camera.  I was so worried that we would get this un-tested camera out in the field and it just wouldn’t work.  Thankfully, I had nothing to worry about.  It all worked perfectly.Bryant: The most surprising thing to me was the level of detail the camera captures especially with the RAW Light format. When you see the image for yourself on a proper display, it’s really stunning. It’s refreshing to see the level of color and soft sharpness (if that makes sense) this camera delivers.How do you feel about the new C200? Let us know in the comments.last_img read more

Is What You Sell of Vital Importance?

first_img Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Now Is the conversation that you want to have with your dream client around something vital? Is it something so important, so necessary that it should command their attention?Not ProductIn some rare cases, your product may rise to the level of being vital, demanding your dream client’s time, attention, and resources. This may be true when they are struggling to obtain whatever it is you sell, but less likely if they are already getting what you sell from your competitor. When the latter is true, when they already have what they need, the tiny improvement your product might produce is not a critical issue.Not ServiceService issues and failures can disrupt a business, creating a strategic issue in an area where one would not exist if their current partner was executing well enough. Unless the day-to-day issues rise to the level that make it worth suffering through the switching costs, you aren’t like to displace your competitor by promising a better experience when your prospect has learned to live with the challenges that happen in the normal course of business.Not a Few PenniesYou might be able to produce a better turn on the investment your prospect makes, and you may be able to reduce their pricing and show them some savings. There are, believe it or not, some salespeople and sales organizations that still lead with a lower price as a way to reduce their prospect’s costs as a way to improve the ROI. Sophisticated, savvy business people aren’t easily lured into changing partners for a lower price because they know that they are taking money out of their solution. Because saving a few pennies doesn’t move the needle, it isn’t a vital issue (and when saving a few pennies is vital, your prospect may not be doing well).What makes something vital is how important it is to producing the necessary or critical outcomes your prospect needs. The things that rise to being vital tend to be the more strategic outcomes, things that contribute to the goals and the direction of the people who decide when—and if—they are going to entertain the idea of changing what they are doing.When you show someone your product in the first five minutes of a call, you have identified yourself as someone who wants to talk about something non-vital.last_img read more

Duchess Of Cornwall Visits UNICEF Projects In Serbia

first_imgHer Royal Highness The Duchess of Cornwall travelled with UNICEF this week to visit a centre in Belgrade, Serbia, which is supporting vulnerable children and their families.On her visit, The Duchess of Cornwall met children and their families supported by the centre, which is also supported by The Novak Djokovic Foundation. She met those living in extreme poverty or with mental health illnesses or disabilities as well as family outreach workers who are empowering parents to look after their children in healthy environments, keep them safe and avoid the risk of them being placed in institutions.The centre works to keep families together and teams also support parents whose children are returning home after time spent in foster care. They ensure the family’s reunion is successful and the child returns to a safe and stable environment.On her visit to the UNICEF supported centre, The Duchess of Cornwall met with families who spoke to her about their experiences and the invaluable and life changing help they receive. One mother emphasised how important this centre is to her and her family and the difference it’s made to their futures.UNICEF UK Executive Director, David Bull, said: “We are thrilled that The Duchess of Cornwall took time in her two-day visit to Serbia to meet vulnerable families supported by Unicef in Serbia. Unicef is working to keep families together and help keep more children safe and protected.”Speaking on behalf of his Foundation and as a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, Novak Djokovic said in a video message to the Duchess of Cornwall: “I want to thank The Duchess of Cornwall for deciding to visit families from the project Families at Risk, jointly implemented by the Government of Serbia, UNICEF and the Novak Djokovic Foundation.This project is of great importance for all of us because it focuses on empowering families, and strong families are the pillars of every society.“We cannot have happy, playful and inquisitive children without providing them with a safe environment in which they can grow, play and develop. My family was my safe haven while I was growing up and this fact alone helped me to become the man I am today. Now, both my wife and I wish to provide the same nurturing environment to our son.

“So far, 400 families and children have passed through this project and all of them have said that their family outreach worker helped them to strengthen their parenting skills and to enhance relationships in the family; in essence that they made them feel better and safer.“Some of the families were fortunate enough, for the first time, to celebrate their children’s birthdays together, others were never again separated from each other; many children improved their school grades because they could come back home to loving and caring parents.”The Duchess of Cornwall visited UNICEF’s programmes as part of a visit to the Western Balkans alongside The Prince of Wales from 14th- 19th March 2016.last_img read more