Alan Pardew admits he’s worried after Newcastle’s latest loss

first_imgNewcastle manager Alan Pardew admitted his growing concern after his team’s poor recent run continued with a 2-1 defeat against Fulham.The Magpies, so impressive last season, have lost five of their last six league matches and their defensive shortcomings were exposed again at Craven Cottage.“I’m worried in as much as we’re not picking up points,” said Pardew.“Performances have been much improved – our attacking has more fluency about it – but it’s a worry that we don’t have enough points on the board.“We’ve got a tough run of games. We’ve put ourselves under pressure by losing two home games against Swansea and West Ham – that hurt us.”Pardew’s side have now gone seven months without an away win.“It’s difficult to put our finger on it,” he added.“Some performances have been good. We need to get back the resilience we showed last year away from home.”See also:Rodallega’s winner gives Fulham victoryPoor Magpies defending angers 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Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Can Darwin Help Your Doctor?

first_imgAre you sick? Should you rely on Darwinism or Science?by Jerry Bergman, PhDUnder the headline “Darwin can help your doctor,” a press release from the University of Groningen claimed that “Evolution and ecology inspire clinical research in infections and antimicrobial resistance”[1]. The editors explain: “Taking an evolutionary view can inspire new ideas in clinical microbiology. For example, evolutionary studies can reveal why some antimicrobial dosing regimens are better than others in preventing the development of drug resistance.”As I read the review, it soon became apparent that the word evolution was tacked onto the report for no good reason except to give obeisance to Darwinism. The approach described in the report had nothing to do with Darwinism but was rather an example of the classic empirical experimental approach. This approach requires scientists to evaluate the proposed “antimicrobial dosing regimens” on patients and then study the outcome. For example, a sample of affected patients would be randomized into 5 treatment groups of 20 patients each, then the outcome of each group is compared. If statistical differences are found at the alpha 0.05 level or better (such as alpha 0.01) to insure the difference between the two is very unlikely due to chance, this lends evidence to the conclusion that the protocol found most effective is actually, as a whole, more effective. The report then added:Looking at microbial communities, rather than just the pathogenic micro-organisms, can also lead to new insights. That is why clinicians, bioinformaticians analysing pathogens and evolutionary biologists should all work together. These are the conclusions of a diverse group of scientists led by University of Groningen microbiologist Marjon de Vos, in a short review published by The Lancet Infectious Diseases on 30 April.[2]Again, this is an example of an obvious truism. Of course, “clinicians, bioinformaticians analysing pathogens and evolutionary biologists should all work together.” I have to wonder what evolutionary biologists could possibly contribute. MicrobiologistDe Vos studies urinary tract infections. She realized that a lot could be gained by collaborating with different specialists … For example, …  bacteria involved communicate with each other and can form a stable ecosystem, which affects their susceptibility to antibiotics.’ This realization led to an interdisciplinary workshop in 2017, which in turn resulted in the review paper now published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.[3]Still no answer as what this research has to do with evolution. So I read on.The consensus can be wrong, and has been wrong numerous times, when it comes to evoluition.The article then discussed cystic fibrosisThe review mentioned bioinformatics, which is an analysis of “the vast amount of genetic data collected on infectious diseases.” This also has nothing to do with evolution unless one is searching for long-term, millions of years, evolutionary trends. In this case, the bioinformatics technique is a fishing expedition looking for trends in gene expression patterns that may relate to the medical condition of concern. The doctors explain that cyclic antibiotic treatments in cystic fibrosis patients are used to treat chronic lung infections which are common in this condition. To minimize the development of drug resistance, treatment alternates with two different drugs.[4] If the pathogens become resistant to one drug, ideally, the other will be effective. Obviously, this approach could result in multi-drug resistance.This is the claim I was expecting, which has nothing to do with evolution. I will cover the most common claim, that is antibiotic resistance due to mutations which create bacteria incorrectly termed “superbugs.”How do bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics?Although bacteria can become resistant due to mutations, all these mutations studied so far are either loss mutations, or damage-to-gene-expression mutations that damage the system that speeds up the removal of, or the inactivation of, antibiotics. None of these effects are the result of new cellular innovations, but are caused merely by damaging something in the bacteria.One type of mutation can alter the shape of the antibiotic binding site. The antibiotic works by fitting into the antibiotic binding site and, like a lock and key, if the keyhole is damaged, the key will no longer fit into the lock. Likewise, if the antibiotic binding site is distorted as a result of damage caused by mutations, the antibiotic will no longer fit into the antibiotic binding site, protecting the bacteria from the antibiotic.A side effect is the mutation can degrade or destroy the function for which the bacteria binding site was designed. For example, a neutral mutation in one amino acid that prevents the required antibody-enzyme interaction alters the binding site on the 4-quinolone antibiotic which disables the DNA gyrase enzyme in bacteria. The gyrase enzyme is an essential bacterial enzyme that catalyzes the ATP-dependent negative super-coiling of double-stranded closed-circular DNA. It reduces the twisting strain occurring while double-stranded DNA is being unwound by elongating RNA-polymerase.The classic example of mutations in the antibiotic mechanism which causes the bacteria to become immune to the antibiotic is ribosome point mutations that renders streptomycin and other mycin antibiotics ineffective.[5]  Mycin antibiotics function by attaching to specific receptor sites on the bacteria’s ribosomes which are required to produce protein to keep the bacteria alive. The result is this antibiotic action interferes with the bacteria protein-manufacturing process.  The proteins the bacteria produce are, as a result of the mutation, either non-functional, or are not even produced. The result is the bacteria cannot grow and divide, or propagate.Bacterial mutations cause the bacteria to become streptomycin-resistant if the ribosome site, where the streptomycin attaches, is altered by mutations. As a result, the streptomycin no longer can bind on the host ribosome, and therefore it no longer can interfere with the ribosomal function of producing protein. Mutation-caused changes that enable the bacteria to become mycin-resistant can occur in several different locations on the ribosome.[6]Mammalian ribosomes do not contain the specific site where myosin drugs attach, and for this reason the drug does not interfere with mammal ribosome function. Consequently, mycin drugs adversely affect bacterial growth without harming the host. Because fundamental differences exist between prokaryotic (bacterial) and eukaryotic ribosomes, these variations often are exploited in order to produce antibiotics to kill bacteria without harming the host. Actually, many antibiotics used are produced by fungi or other bacteria to protect them from enemy bacteria. Humans obtain them to protect them from the same pathogenic bacteria.Another example of a mutation-caused resistance is, in Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria, an enzyme in the bacteria that changes the antibiotic called isoniazid into its active form that kills the bacteria. If a mutation damages the enzyme that converts the antibiotic into its active form, the antibiotic remains in its inactive and harmless conformation. As a result, this mutation confers antibiotic resistance to the mutant bacteria.[7] The mutation that damages the enzyme which prevents the antibiotic from killing the bacteria also cripples the bacteria, an effect called the fitness cost.When bacteria become resistant to antibiotics as a result of mutations, all the mutations studied so far are either loss mutations, or gene-expression mutations that result in speeding up the systems that removes or inactivates antibiotics. None are the result of new cellular innovations but are caused merely by altering the regulation control.all the mutations studied so far are either loss mutations, or gene-expression mutationsEvolution by retreatIn short, this brief discussion illustrates the fact that all known examples of antibiotic resistance are due to inbuilt systems designed to achieve symbiosis, or damage to some system in the host or pathogen that prevents it from properly defending itself. In short, so-called super bacteria are actually damaged bacteria that have an advantage in an environment loaded with antibiotics, such as in a hospital.Conversely, mutations that add new systems, such as a new regulatory system, energy-generating system, or transport system, have never been documented. Mutations increasing certain enzyme affinity may be beneficial, but often occur rapidly, indicating that design is involved. For example, mutations effecting hemoglobin-oxygen affinity help the host to acclimatize to a high altitude, but the same mutation can also cause polycythemia. This response is not evolution, but rather designed adaptation.Mutations that alter a protein which results in antibiotic resistance are also likely to weaken the organism. Mutations that both confer resistance, and allow the bacteria to survive, do not improve the bacteria fitness in its normal environment. The bacteria actually render them less able to survive in an antibiotic-free environment.[8]  Thus, when the bacteria becomes resistant to a drug, it is likely to become less fit in other ways.[9]  This is called the cost of resistance, or the fitness cost.[10] Often the cost is very high and the mutation renders the resistant stain poorly able to survive in a non-antibiotic environment.[11]The last claim covered in the The Lancet Infectious Diseases article was resistance plasmids. Resistance plasmids are small circular DNA that confers resistance to bacteria that can easily be exchanged between bacteria. The Lancet review admits “we still don’t know how changes in genes lead to the different characteristics of these pathogens. We need experiments by evolutionary biologists in order to understand the link between the genotype, the DNA sequence and the phenotype – for instance, the level of resistance.”[12]Empty boastsThe 11-page Lancet article contained the word evolution 103 times and, after analyzing each example, the same problem was found as I have documented in this paper.[13] Of interest is the article’s list of examples of the successes of microbial evolutionary medicine, including the exploitation of the alleged bacterial evolutionary molecular clock to trace transmission events over time in hospitals and continents in spite of the fact that the molecular clock has been a dismal failure, at least for long periods of time.[14][1] “Darwin can help your doctor.” Science Daily. 30 April 2019. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190430103424.htm.[2] “Darwin can help your doctor.” Science Daily. 30 April 2019. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190430103424.htm.[3]  Sandra B Andersen, et al. Microbial evolutionary medicine: from theory to clinical practice. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30045-3[4] Sandra B Andersen, et al. Microbial evolutionary medicine: from theory to clinical practice. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(19)30045-3[5] Davies, A. P., et al., 2000. “Comparison of Fitness of Two Isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, One of which had developed Multi-Drug Resistance during the Course of Treatment.”  Journal of Infection, 41(2):184-187, Sept.; Davies, J. and M. Nomura,  1972. “The Genetics of Bacterial Ribosomes.”  Annual Review of Genetics,  6:203-234.[6] Didier, E. S., D. C. Bertucci, and L. Leblanc,  1999. “Inhibition of Microsporidia Growth in vitro.”  Abstracts of the General Meeting American Society Microbiology,  99:11[7] Wieland, Carl, 1994. “Antibiotic Resistance in Bacteria.”  Cen Tech J., 8(1):5-6, p. 5.[8] Wieland, 1994, p. 6.[9]Spetner, Lee, 1997. Not by Chance. Brooklyn, NY: The Judaica Press, p. 144.[10]Lenski, Richard E., 2002. “Cost of Resistance” in Encyclopedia of Evolution.  Volume 2, pp. 1008-1010.  New York, NY: Oxford University Press.  Mark Pagel (editor), p. 1009.[11]Baquero, Fernando,  2002. “Antibiotic Resistance:  Origins, Mechanisms, and Extent of Resistance” in Encyclopedia of Evolution.  Volume 1, pp. 50-54.  New York, NY: Oxford University Press.  Mark Pagel (editor). p. 51.[12] “Darwin can help your doctor.” Science Daily, 30 April 2019. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190430103424.htm.[13] Andersen, Sandra B., 2019. Evolutionary medicine: from theory to clinical practice. The Lancet Infectious Diseases, online 30 April 2019. https://www.thelancet.com/action/showPdf?pii=S1473-3099%2819%2930045-3.[14] Jeffrey Tomkins and Jerry Bergman, 2015. “Evolutionary Molecular Genetic Clocks–A Perpetual Exercise in Futility and Failure.” Journal of Creation, 29(2):26-35. Dr. Jerry Bergman has taught biology, genetics, chemistry, biochemistry, anthropology, geology, and microbiology at several colleges and universities including for over 40 years at Bowling Green State University, Medical College of Ohio where he was a research associate in experimental pathology, and The University of Toledo. He is a graduate of the Medical College of Ohio, Wayne State University in Detroit, the University of Toledo, and Bowling Green State University. He has over 1,300 publications in 12 languages and 40 books and monographs. His books and textbooks that include chapters that he authored, are in over 1,500 college libraries in 27 countries. So far over 80,000 copies of the 40 books and monographs that he has authored or co-authored are in print. For more articles by Dr Bergman, see his Author Profile.(Visited 301 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Mobile Credit Card Swiping Battle Continues: A Look at 4 Rival Technologies

first_imgIntuit’s top-competitor (that is, if you go by what tech journalists like to write about) is Square, the startup launched by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey. Like GoPayment, Square includes both a mobile app and a credit card reading device – a small, square-shaped device whose shape gives the company its name.Like GoPayment’s (temporary) offer, the reader is free and there are no monthly service fees. The swiped transaction fee is 2.75%, a bit higher than Intuit’s 2.7% but its per transaction fees are the same ($0.15/each). For keyed in transactions, the rate is 3.5% + $0.15.Square says there are no gateway, monthly, early termination or hidden fees and you can accept an unlimited number of payments without restrictions on either transaction size or number of transactions. Square deposits your first $1,001 of sales per week into your bank account immediately. Any remaining amount is transferred after 30 days.As a Square user, you can accept any U.S.-issued credit, debit, pre-paid, or gift card with a Visa, MasterCard, American Express or Discover logo.Unlike GoPayments, Square is currently available for iPhone and Android only (select devices only) – not BlackBerry.It should be noted, too, that Square is currently in a patent battle over the origins of its reader and the related patents. The company had previously run into a number of other issues, including production delays to compatibility issues with the iPhone 4.Verifone PAYware MobileLike the above, Verifone’s PAYware Mobile solution is a combination mobile app and optional reader hardware.The service works on any iPhone (3G/3GS/4) device, iPad or iPod Touch, but only manual entry is supported on the iPhone 4, iPad and iPod. The company says it has plans to expand to BlackBerry, Windows Mobile and Android in the future.The PAYware card encryption sleeve works on iPhone 3G/3GS only. This is PAYware’s key selling point, as it touts the end-to-end encryption it offers, which meets the same security standards used by ATMs and Point-of-Sale terminals. Other vendors, it says, support SSL only, a software-based encryption method.PAYWare also says the fees and fee structures will vary and doesn’t list them on its site. Its rates will be based on risk criteria categorized into  “Qualified”, “Mid-Qualified” and “Non-Qualified” tiers, as is standard. Rates will also vary depending on the type of business and whether or not a transaction is swiped or keyed in, also typical. In addition, gateway fees for access to the PAYware Connect gateway are charged, too. The above prices are what’s available to low-volume customers – the same customers who may have been considering Square’s reader instead. For high-volumne customers, there are different rates – a $12.95/month service fee; 1.7% for card swiped; 2.7% for key entered and 3.7% for non-qualified transactions, like corporate cards; and a $0.30 per transaction fee.GoPayment also offers no long-term contracts, cancellation, gateway or set-up fees, it says. One account can enable up to 50 users and works on iPhone, iPad, Android, BlackBerry, plus some Palm and Nokia devices.Merchants can accept a number of credit cards with the service, but additional fees apply when accepting cards other than Visa, MasterCard and Discover (like American Express or Diner’s Club cards).There is more than one type of hardware attachment available for use with GoPayment. Intuit partnered with Mophie for its iPhone reader, for example, the makers of iPhone battery-charging solutions like the Juice Pack. There are also Bluetooth-enabled readers and reader/printer combos available.*One important note: GoPayment is only offering a free account and free reader to those who sign up by mid-February, after which prices may revert back, although Intuit isn’t confiriming. Square To use ROAMpay, customers must contact their merchant account provider to see if they carry ROAMpay. If so, they will help you get signed up, which includes locating the appropriate hardware and downloading the $2.99 app from iTunes, if applicable. ROAMpay says this fee applies for any other phone that supports mobile apps, including Google Android devices and phones that offer Verizon Wireless’s Get It Now service. With ROAMpay, your normal payment processing fees apply. You can also use ROAMpay on your PC or Mac.If you don’t have a merchant account, ROAMpay can connect you with its Payment Partners.ROAMpay also promotes its security features – all payment info is double-encrypted as entered on the device and is never fully decrypted until it enters the payment gateway for processing by one of ROAM’s payment platform partners. No sensitive data such as card numbers, magnetic stripe information or security codes are stored on the mobile device. Tags:#e-commerce#Features#mobile#Real World#web Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology sarah perezcenter_img Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces You can get an idea of PAYware’s fees, by checking out reseller’s pricing plans, like this one, which lists setup fees, monthly fees, per transactions fees, etc.  For a more personalized quote, PAYware says t can go here for more info.Typically though, a setup fee of $49 and monthly fees of $20 to $30 apply, as do per transaction fees, which are either taken as a straight amount or a percentage. The reader may be offered for free, depending on the contract length. It’s usually sold for $139. The mobile application used along with the hardware is free.PAYware accepts Visa, MasterCard, American Express and Discover credit and debit cards.ROAMpayROAMpay, another mobile credit card device and app combo, is available for a number of phones, including the iPhone 3G/3GS/4, iPad, several Android devices, BlackBerry phones, select Nokia phones and many others. The Swiper hardware is available for several Android and Apple devices and BlackBerry.Merchants can accept Visa, MasterCard and Discover credit and debit cards, and others. Square, the mobile payments company launched in 2009 by Twitter co-founder Jack Dorsey, is the name most often bandied about in tech circles these days when it comes to talk of credit-card swiping attachments made for iPhone. But Square was never alone on the mobile payments battlefront, and now it has a new competitor backed by a well-known brand name: Intuit.Today Intuit is making its two-year-old premium GoPayment service free – a service which comes with a magnetic stripe reader attachment that hooks onto the iPhone, similar to the one Square offers.Intuit GoPaymentIntuit’s GoPayment’s offering is a combination of a mobile application and, optionally, a magnetic stripe reader that attaches to the phone. Intuit no longer charges the $13/month fee or charges for the reader attachment (previously $219) – it’s all free now*. But to make that possible, GoPayment takes a higher cut of the transactions with its new discount rate fee of 2.7% (before it was 1.7%). For key-entered and non-qualified transactions, the rate is 3.7%. In addition, $0.15 is charged per transaction. These fees are competitive with Square. Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech …last_img read more

Cross Platform Mobile App Creator OpenPlug Drops All Fees

first_imgmarshall kirkpatrick OpenPlug, a development toolkit for creating native apps for phones, tablets and other connected devices using JavaScript, ActionScript and XML, today became available free of charge or advertising – after more than 8 years of doing paid and ad-supported business. The company also announced a Certified OpenPlug Solutions Provider Program. OpenPlug was acquired by international communications network technology platform (and sponsor of this blog) Alcatel-Lucent in the Fall of 2010. Over on the main channel of ReadWriteWeb we analyzed the role of the technology in the larger ecosystem of network-level applications and APIs in depth when the acquisition was announced. I said over there that it was a very big deal; now what could be better than a very big deal turned free? For further perspective, see this 2008 discussion of open (including OpenPlug) vs. closed mobile application development platforms written by John Puterbaugh, founder of 10-year old mobile marketing technology company Nelly Moser. See also related companies Titanium and PhoneGap. Related Posts Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Tags:#mobile#news center_img What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technologylast_img read more

Time Remapping In Adobe Premiere Pro

first_imgFreeze motion and vary speed overtime by using the handy time remapping feature in Adobe Premiere.Use time mapping in Adobe Premiere Pro to create cool speed changes in footage. From slo-mo to super speed, time shifts will add visual interest to your edits!In this Adobe Premiere Pro tutorial you will learn:Creating time remap keyframesChanging speeds and smoothing the speed transitionCreating a freeze frame and time reverseCreating Time Remapping Keyframes in the TimelineTo start time remapping your footage, in the timeline click on the word opacity for the clip you want to speed change.  Then, select Time Remapping > Speed from the pulldown menu.Add keyframes where you want a speed change by holding Command (Mac) or Control (Win) and clicking on the yellow line. This creates speed segments.Changing Speeds and smoothing the speed transition in Premiere ProHold Shift and drag down the yellow line (rubber band)to change in increments of 5%. (I changed mine to 50%). 2 “gotchas” to be aware of:Time remapping doesn’t effect the audio (it stays normal speed)If an another clip immediately follows this one it will trim the time remapped clip.Adobe recommends time remapping a clip without another clip immediately following it for this reason.Once you’ve added your time remapping keyframes, click and drag on a speed keyframe to smooth the speed transition.Creating a Freeze Frame and Time Reverse in Premiere ProTo create a freeze frame segment, hold Command (Mac) or Control (Win)  and  Option/Alt while dragging a keyframe.To create a time reversed segment, hold Command (Mac) or Control (PC) and drag a keyframe.Use Adobe Premiere Pro’s time remapping tools to give your footage an edgy stylized look!Was this tutorial helpful for you?  Do you have other tricks for applying slo-mo in your video edits?We want to hear from you in the comments!last_img read more

Six Technologies Poised to Change the Future of Film

first_imgWhat does the future hold for filmmaking? These six new technologies may change things in ways you haven’t imagined.Top image via LytroIn 1885 two French brothers invented the first moving picture machine and filmed a train arriving at a station and everyone lost their minds. Since then, the medium has evolved; film has added color and sound and become digital and three-dimensional. We’ve seen the likes of D. W. Griffith, Orson Welles, Alfred Hitchcock, Stanley Kubrick, Keanu Reeves, and Steven Spielberg all work to redefine what we consider to be movies, film, cinema and good.Now it’s 2016 and we’re over a hundred years removed from The Great Train Robbery. Screens are getting smaller and smarter, while films are getting bigger and more diverse and easier to consume than ever before. At the current rate, what we perceive as films will change much more drastically in the next hundred years than the last. Here are six emerging filmmaking technologies that just might be the instruments of that change.1. Light Field TechnologyImage via LytroCameras are progressing at a rate that can only be described as “whoa” and are even beginning to break the rules of image capture. A new camera by Lytro, the ILLUM, is the world’s first commercially available “light field camera.” What does it do?Well, basically when you take a picture with the ILLUM, you capture all of the image with all of the available information. Not just the parts in focus. Not just the light you see. All of it. Everything. Which essentially lets you decide in post what you want your aperture and focus to be.You can read more about the science here and explore the company’s other high-tech endeavors here.2. Flat LensesImage via Harvard SEASA team of Harvard researchers are working to patent a new type of optical lens that is flat rather than curved. Why you ask? Because a flat, ultra-thin lens can theoretically offer complete accuracy over a wider range of wavelengths and reduce chromatic aberrations usually associated with curved-lens capture. The new technology would certainly re-image how we create and package cameras — possibly resulting in doing away with any connotations of what a “camera” does and looks like.3. iPhone 7 Dual-Lens CameraWhile, the iPhone 7 won’t be the first phone camera to use dual lenses — it’ll probably be the best. Apple’s purchase of LinX Imaging gives the company the technology to give their phones SLR-quality image capturing capabilities, along with the always included fun gimmicks and features. There have already been some celebrated feature films shot on iPhones in the past, so it may not be too long before it becomes less of a gimmick and more of a trend.4. Canon PatentsImage via CanonAs we posted about earlier this month, there have been some hints and patent leaks that point to some major Canon announcements by the end of the summer. Highlights include a new Canon 5D, a camera which has routinely shaken up the world of digital video and photography over the last decade. And a possible Canon C700 to compete with the ARRI AMIRA. Regardless of your feelings about the brand, the breakthroughs seem to be speeding up as pixel counts sky rocket and the high-end bottoms out toward better cameras in the hands of more and more people.5. Computerized Sound DesignImage via MIT CSAILFrom this Washington Post article, MIT researchers have developed a computer system that can analyze silent video and add in realistic sound. While this is a work in progress based on the findings in the report, the notion of computerized algorithms sound designing an entire film could open up a whole world of possibilities for other elements of production.6. AI-written ScreenplaysWhich leads into this eerie and odd look into how a computer’s “mind” works.  New York University AI researcher Ross Goodwin teamed up with director Oscar Sharp to create Benjamin: a self-named recurrent neural network that penned its own screenplay after being fed dozens of science fiction movies as source material.You can watch the finished product (starring Silicon Valley’s Thomas Middleditch) awkwardly unfold above. (Thankfully, it doesn’t appear Benjamin is on the fast-track to taking over Hollywood anytime soon.)There’s no real way to tell what the future holds in store. If the last century has served as any indication (the jump from Buster Keaton silent comedies to fully rendered interspecies adventures), there really aren’t any good ways to predict what will ever be next. As long as artists keep creating stories and audiences keep watching, it’s really just up to us to enjoy the ride. Have any other imaginations on the future of film? Let us know in the comments below.last_img read more

TNT coach Bong Ravena says absent Terrence Romeo ‘just sick’

first_imgRavena did say that whatever’s going on with Romeo is beneficial to both the former Far Eastern University star and the whole KaTropa team.“As of now, wherever he’s in it’s maybe the best for him and the team,” said Ravena after the PBA Draft Sunday at Robinson’s Manila. “He did not go AWOL (absent without official leave) he had a flu so we let him rest first.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefRomeo was traded to TNT in April of 2018 after playing his first five years with NorthPort, then known as Globalport, and if a trade happens then the spitfire guard won’t even last a year with TNT.Ravena did not also confirm if whether Romeo is indeed being shopped in the trade market or not. Yeng Guiao ‘can’t confirm’ Poy Erram trade to NLEX yet “I don’t want to confirm it or deny it,” said Ravena.He added that there’s no problem with Romeo and that he’s just sick.“There’s no problem with him and he’s professional with dealing with teams,” said Ravena.ADVERTISEMENT Hotel management clarifies SEAG footballers’ kikiam breakfast issue TS Kammuri to enter PAR possibly a day after SEA Games opening MOST READ LOOK: Joyce Pring goes public with engagement to Juancho Triviño Bong Ravena. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netMANILA, Philippines—TNT head coach Bong Ravena beat around the bush when asked about the status of polarizing guard Terrence Romeo with the team.Romeo is reportedly on the trading block after being absent from the team for some time now, but Ravena did not say exactly if the guard will be traded or not.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles01:30’Excited’ Terrence Romeo out to cherish first PBA finals appearance01:16Go goads Robredo to take ICAD post: ‘Tignan natin kung makakatulog ka pa’02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completioncenter_img LATEST STORIES Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next View comments Lacson: 2019 budget delay due to P75-B House ‘insertion’ Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Is Luis Manzano planning to propose to Jessy Mendiola? SEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionlast_img read more