Trey Anastasio Talks About The Night Phish Partied At Paisley Park

first_imgThe members of Phish have long been Prince fans, getting their start around the same time when Prince was peaking in his popularity during the 1980’s. While Phish has covered Prince’s “Purple Rain” many times over, and even “1999″ on New Year’s Eve 1998, the band’s ties to the Purple One run even deeper than covering his music.In an interview with Rolling Stone, Trey Anastasio recalls a singular night – November 11th, 1996 – that Phish and Prince crossed paths. The entire band was invited to Prince’s Paisley Park mansion when they were in town for a show in Minneapolis.Anastasio recalls the intimate crowd, which included Ziggy Marley, Boyz II Men and a couple hundred others. “We were kind of standing in the corner,” said Anastasio. “One thing I remember is he didn’t serve cocktails, so in lieu of cocktails he served little Captain Crunch cereal boxes. I thought that was the coolest thing.”At the party, Prince plugged in and played some tunes with his band. Anastasio recalls the music vividly. “It was really cool. He was such a great guitar player, but people don’t point out he was a great rhythm guitar player. The band was playing this funky stuff. He had a woman singing with him, a kind of gospel singer, and she stepped out and started killing it. He stepped back, and I remember thinking that everybody tries to play like James Brown’s rhythm guitar player. Jammy guys do it a lot, and they all get it wrong, myself included. He was playing the most badass little rhythms with the drummer as soon as he got out of the spotlight. I was so fascinated by what he was playing. That’s when I noticed what a great guitar player he was.”He continued to muse over Prince’s musical abilities in the interview. “The guy had the best bands… They were unbelievable. And that’s a skill in itself. Zappa didn’t just stumble into having bands that good. Prince didn’t just stumble into having bands that good. Bandleading is an art form. I have a little bit of experience in this, and let me tell you, I always admire people who consistently have great bands. Prince had figured out a way to hire really unique, really talented, really tight bands. And it’s easy to get one. But try getting two or three. That’s different. It’s horrible that he’s gone. I was heartbroken. He was way, way too young.”While Anastasio never got to meet Prince, he was certainly in awe of his talents. “I don’t think he would have known who I was, but it didn’t matter.” He also called it “an unforgettable night.” RIP, Prince.On Sunday, April 30, Prince, and the many incredible artists that we lost in 2016, will be honored in New Orleans during Jazz Fest for a “Funk 2016: A Tribute To Musicians We Lost” tribute concert at the Howlin’ Wolf. Prince, David Bowie, George Michael, Maurice White, Phife Dawg, and more will all be honored with musical collaborations from Michelangelo Carubba, Shira Elias, Sammi Garett, Craig Brodhead, and the entire horn section from Turkuaz, along with Joey Porter, Garrett Sayers, and Lyle Divinsky of The Motet, D.J. Williams of Karl Denson’s Tiny Universe, Danny Mayer of the Eric Krasno Band, Steveland Swatkins of Allen Stone’s band, Khris Royal and Maurice “Mobetta” Brown.The Revivalists side project RumpleSTEELskin will open the night, while Brooklyn’s own The London Souls will perform a special super-late-night performance in The Den immediately following the Fu*k 2016 tribute set. Make no mistake, this is sure to be one of the biggest throwdowns during Jazz Fest!Tickets for this special late-night performance are on sale NOW at this link!last_img read more

Irish performance impresses fans

first_imgNotre Dame’s narrow, last-second defeat of Louisiana State University (LSU) in the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl capped off the 2014 football season in dramatic fashion, much to the delight of local fans and those venturing to Nashville, Tennessee, from nearby midwestern and southeastern states.“It was great to see my school’s football team playing so close to home,” junior and Nashville native Jessica Zic said. “Also, I was excited to see that the Notre Dame football team practiced at my high school’s football stadium during the days leading up to the game.”Junior Lauren Pate, who hails from Memphis, Tennessee, said she jumped at the chance to attend the Dec. 30 bowl game because she missed the football season studying abroad in Kampala, Uganda. She said she made the three-hour trip in the morning with other Memphians and had enough time to walk around and enjoy live music in downtown Nashville before the game.“I didn’t really keep track of the 2014 football season because I was abroad, but I had heard about the ending of the Northwestern game, so it had me nervous for the ending of the Music City Bowl,” Pate said. “We won though, so I was very happy for that and glad it was the game I got to see for the end of the 2014 season.”Freshman Katharine Janes traveled with her family from Michigan and said the atmosphere at the game differed noticeably from a typical Notre Dame football experience.“The game day experience was incredible. The stadium was alive with excited football fans, and it was so much fun to reconnect with friends from school that you didn’t know you would be running into 600 miles away from home,” she said. “… I sat in a few parts of the stadium — ranging from directly off the LSU sideline to the upper bowl on the ND side — but I think that all parts felt incredibly energized.“It was definitely a different experience than watching a home game from the student section, but it was the best of both worlds to be able to watch part of the game with my family in the stands yet also experience other parts with students from ND.”Pate said she sat in the student section, right next to the Band of the Fighting Irish. She said the section was “very small but nonetheless lively.”“All of the fans seemed very excited despite the cold, and very engaged with the band and cheerleaders in all the cheers and songs,” she said.Senior Russell King, a drum major in the Band of the Fighting Irish, said the band practiced once in Nashville before their halftime show which featured versions of Ariana Grande’s “Break Free” and Europe’s “The Final Countdown.”“It was cold, but we have fantastic fans who braved the weather to come support us [at practice before the bowl],” King said. “There were about 100 fans who came out that morning. The band had not marched in about a month so it was a well-needed rehearsal to polish the show.”The band participated in several pre-game events in downtown Nashville leading up to the bowl game, including a battle of the bands with LSU’s band, King said.“The actual game is only a small part of the Music City Bowl experience,” he said. “A subset of the band played at the ACC Pep Rally, the Alumni Kick-Off at the Rock Bottom Brewery and a ND tailgate at the Acme Feed & Seed.“However, by far the largest event was the Battle of the Bands. Thousands of people showed up to support both our band and the LSU Marching Tigers. Both bands marched side-by-side but in opposite directions on the main street of Nashville.“Then, the bands faced each other and went back and forth with our best songs. In my opinion, the knockout punch came with another stellar singing performance of ‘Ooh Poo Pah Doo’ by sophomore clarinetist Michelle Mann. However, LSU countered with their best song and the battle was declared a tie.”Sophomore Kristen Ochs, who came from Ohio for the game, said the team’s performance in the last seconds of the game, especially senior kicker Kyle Brindza’s field goal in the last four seconds that put the Irish up 31-28, left her optimistic for the prospects of the 2015 season.“I think this game allowed for a brighter end to what many might call a disappointing season,” she said. “Clearly, things can change quickly since we started out so well with high hopes and didn’t end very well at all.”Pate said the team demonstrated more poise than she had expected.“My biggest takeaway was the true grit of our team and how well they performed under the pressure of the game,” Pate said. “I was very impressed. I’m looking forward to seeing how this win will transfer over to next season. I’m hoping it’ll give us a boost of confidence to start and finish the season strong.”Tags: bowl game, Fighting Irish, football, Kyle Brindza, Music City Bowl, Nashvillelast_img read more

White girls don’t have sex: The middle class lie on HPV that puts teens at risk

first_imgNZ Herald 15 March 2015Parents of well-off Pakeha girls are less likely to get their daughters immunised against an STI because “white girls don’t have sex”, a Massey University PhD candidate believes.Postgraduate researcher Karen Page, of the university’s College of Health, is trying to establish why New Zealand’s vaccination rates for human papillomavirus (HPV) are lower for Pakeha than other ethnicities, and also lower in high-decile schools than those in poorer communities.Page believes that many parents think their daughters don’t need it because they’re not having sex.“It’s the ‘white girls don’t have sex [theory] so white girls don’t need it’. That’s what it’s all about, I think,” she told the Herald on Sunday.About half of New Zealand 15-year-olds were sexually active and, at some point in their lives, about 80 per cent of adults would get the sexually transmitted infection.HPV causes almost all cervical cancer in this country and can cause genital warts, but most women who develop the virus clear it naturally.http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11417429last_img read more