Suzan-Lori Parks Will Be the Signature Theatre’s Next Residency One Playwright

first_imgSuzan-Lori Parks(Photo by Tammy Shell) View Comments Suzan-Lori Parks will be the Residency One Playwright of the Signature Theatre’s 2016-17 season. She penned the Broadway hit Topdog/Underdog, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 2002, making Parks the first African American woman to receive the award. The Signature’s one-year program produces a series of plays from the body of work of one accomplished writer.Parks is currently writing an adaptation of the 1972 reggae film The Harder They Come for a live stage musical. The movie starred Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Jimmy Cliff and propelled the spread of the Jamaican musical genre. Director Perry Henzell oversaw the book for a 2005 production of The Harder They Come, which was staged at Theatre Royal Stratford East. The tuner moved on to the Playhouse Theatre in the West End in 2008.A MacArthur “Genius” Award and Gish Prize recipient, Parks’ new play Father Comes Home From the Wars (Parts 1, 2 & 3) made its world premiere at the Public Theater in New York, followed by a celebrated run at the A.R.T in Cambridge, and is opening in spring of 2016 at the Center Theatre Group in Los Angeles. The play was named a finalist for the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Drama and was awarded the 2015 Edward M. Kennedy Prize for Drama Inspired by American History as well as the 2014 Horton Foote Prize. Parks’ work on The Gershwins’ Porgy and Bess was honored with the 2012 Tony Award. Her numerous plays include The Book of Grace, In The Blood (2000 Pulitzer Prize finalist), Venus (1996 OBIE Award), 365 Days/365 Plays, and The Death of the Last Black Man in the Whole Entire World, among others.Her first feature-length screenplay was Girl 6, written for Spike Lee. She’s also penned screenplays for Brad Pitt, Denzel Washington and Jodie Foster, as well as adapted Zora Neale Hurston’s classic novel Their Eyes Were Watching God which premiered on ABC’s Oprah Winfrey Presents. Parks is the Master Writer Chair at the Public Theater, and she serves as a professor in dramatic writing at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts.last_img read more

Governor Shumlin to refocus state’s relationship with UVM

first_imgUniversity of Vermont,Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin gave the following address regarding the state of Vermont’s relationship with the University of Vermont. The public policy initiative, which would include the state college system, is to better focus the limited financial resources the state has into ‘maximum return on investment,’ as the governor put it, with particular focus on advancing science, engineering, technology and mathematics education.To this end, he announced a working group comprised of prominent Vermonters with ties to UVM and led by Nick Donofrio, a former top executive at IBM in Vermont. They are charged with identifying key issues between the state and the university and making recommendations that will be presented to the governor and the new UVM president next July. UVM Interim President John Bramley is also a member of the group.Shumlin made his remarks Tuesday afternoon at the Hoehl Gallery at the UVM College of Medicine.Remarks by Governor Peter ShumlinUniversity of VermontNovember 8, 2011Good afternoon and thank you for being here. I am here today on the University of Vermont campus to talk about the future of the university and its essential relationship with the state of Vermont. This is a topic that means a lot to me. I am convinced that Vermont can become known nationally as the Education State in the coming years, and that UVM will play a critical role in that evolution.To be clear, the state of higher education in Vermont is already strong. In addition to UVM, our state colleges and independent colleges consistently rank among the top in the nation. Young Vermonters and students from across the country are receiving a world-class education right now in the Green Mountain State. These schools have a $3 billion impact annually on Vermont’s economy.Since my focus today is on UVM, let me say a few words specifically about the University and its unique role in our state. UVM is a state treasure and a huge asset. It is the state’s only research university, contributing $1 billion a year to our economy. It retains and graduates Vermont students at record rates, and attracts thousands of young from across the nation and the world to study and live here. Its research and knowledge creation is key to Vermont’s future. Nearly 30,000 UVM graduates live and work here, contributing every day to our state’s quality of life.Just take a look at UVM’s vision and mission and you will hope, like I do, that the University succeeds in fulfilling them for the benefit of its students, our state, and our nation.UVM’s vision is, and I quote, ‘To be among the nation’s premier small research universities, preeminent in our comprehensive commitment to liberal education, environment, health, and public service.’The university’s mission is ‘To create, evaluate, share, and apply knowledge and to prepare students to be accountable leaders who will bring to their work dedication to the global community, a grasp of complexity, effective problem-solving and communication skills, and an enduring commitment to learning and ethical conduct.’Look around Vermont right now, and you will find the spirit of this mission hard at work. This University produces one of the best trained workforces in the country. Some of you may have heard of UVM graduates Briar and Adam Alpert. Their father, a UVM faculty member, founded BioTek Instruments, a cutting-edge manufacturer of medical equipment right here in Vermont. Briar and Adam have since taken over the company, and as creative entrepreneurs, they have made BioTek one of the best places to work in the state and business has thrived.Similarly, Steve Arms is the founder, President and CEO of MicroStrain, a company which develops and manufactures miniature sensors. Andrew Meyer has been busy since he graduated from UVM, founding the Center for an Agricultural Economy and helping to usher in a new era of innovative, value-added agriculture in Vermont. Other Vermont business leaders produced by this University include Jan Blittersdorf, President and CEO of NRG Systems, David Blittersdorf, President and CEO of AllEarth Renewables, Janette Bombardier, head of IBM’s Essex Plant, and the Pizzagalli brothers, leaders of PC Construction, one of the nation´s largest employee-owned contractors. UVM graduate Rich Tarrant is CEO and founder, with his two brothers, Jerry and Brian ‘ also graduates of the university — of Internet software firm MyWebGrocer. The list is endless.Because the futures of UVM and the state of Vermont are inextricably linked, I believe it is both appropriate and timely to take a hard look at the relationship between the state and the university. Vermont has always had limited resources to fund higher education in general and UVM in particular ‘ a reality made more stark by the continuing recession and the devastating impact of Tropical Storm Irene.The limited state resources we have available must be invested in Vermont’s only research university in strategically focused ways that have the maximum return on investment for Vermont and Vermonters. We have debated how UVM is funded and governed, but not taken action in nearly 60 years. The time to do so is now, with a strong sense of creativity, common sense, and focus on what is good for the future of both the state and the university.Before I lay out a proposal to examine the important relationship between the state and UVM, let me offer a brief historical context.The University of Vermont became public in 1955. At that time, there was no Vermont State College System and no Vermont Student Assistance Corporation. Since 1955, state funds for UVM have been spent in three basic ways: tuition offsets for Vermonters, support for the College of Medicine, and funding for Agricultural services. This year’s state appropriation was about $40 million, with an additional $1.8 million for capital expenditures. While these public dollars represent a small fraction of the combined revenues that support UVM’s $600 million plus operation, both UVM officials and I believe that it is very important that these funds be invested wisely and strategically to advance Vermonters job opportunities.I have made no secret of my concerns about some of the spending priorities UVM has made in recent years. Those concerns have been widely reported in the press, and I stand by those observations. I have said throughout some of these recent controversies, however, that my interest is not in criticizing the University for the sake of argument, but because I believe, working together, we can devise strategies for spending state dollars that produce better results for UVM, for our business community, and for the state.I believe these spending strategies should focus on a set of priorities that require making some hard long-term choices. These priorities include:â ¢ Preparing students for the jobs of the future by providing greater focus on the sciences, engineering, technology and mathematics.â ¢ Connecting the power of the research university and its educational programs to support and expand partnerships in the state’s business sector and economy.â ¢ Maintaining and innovating the essential infrastructure in agriculture that supports our economy and way of life, and fosters Vermont’s bright future as a quality food producer.â ¢ Supporting the transition to a health care system that contains costs, takes the burden off employers and strengthens health care delivery to keep Vermonters healthy.â ¢ Capitalizing on UVM’s leadership in environmental and complex systems ‘ systems that address one of my top priorities, the reality of our changing climate – by expanding its academic programs and offerings in climate change. I have long believed that the University can become a top national leader in this arena and am optimistic about the entrepreneurial opportunities in confronting climate change.â ¢ Preparing our students not only to get good jobs in Vermont when they graduate from UVM, but also for students to go out and create those good jobs as burgeoning entrepreneurs.â ¢ Collaborating with the Vermont State Colleges to ensure that our system of higher education is maximizing opportunities for students, limiting duplication, and increasing access, particularly for first generation college students.Since John Bramley became Interim President at UVM this summer, he and I have been engaged in a dialogue about these priorities and the relationship between the University and the state. While we may not agree on all issues regarding that relationship, I believe John and I share very similar views about the need to take a hard and realistic look at how we work together in the coming years and decades.Specifically, John and I agree that the current situation is not sustainable for the University or its students. We can do a better job of investing scarce state dollars in the disciplines and research that will be the economic engines of the next century. In my view, we are falling short of our goal of maximizing our return on state investment.A new strategy is needed, and today I am announcing a framework for developing that strategy.I have asked a group of eight highly skilled individuals with expertise in a wide range of disciplines, all of whom have deep ties with Vermont or the University of Vermont, to serve as an advisory group that develops ways to maximize the relationship between the University and the state.This group will be asked to examine a set of key issues related to that relationship, and provide recommendations to me and the incoming President of the University by July of next year. Their areas of focus will include, but not be limited to, the following areas:1. The differing roles of the University of Vermont and the Vermont State Colleges, and the implications and opportunities for program consolidation, reduction in duplication, and cost savings.2. Opportunities for public investment in high state priority programs and targeted scholarships at UVM with maximum return on investment, such as science, technology, engineering, and math.3. Directed scholarships in certain disciplines, incentives to stay in Vermont or return to Vermont.4. Other alternative, strategic approaches to focus and strengthen the relationship between UVM and Vermont for mutual benefit, including maximizing spires of excellence, innovation and job growth.The goal of this process is to engage in a strategic, data-driven dialogue that leads to specific, workable, and realistic outcomes.The group will meet regularly, both in person and virtually, and submit their recommendations to me and to the new UVM president taking office next summer. It will include the following individuals:â ¢ Nick Donofrio, chair. Nick is an innovator and entrepreneur and is the former Executive Vice President for Innovation and Technology at IBM and former General Manager of IBM’s plant in Essex.â ¢ Deb Granquist. Deb is a former banker and retired attorney who runs a consulting company to support non-profits. She is active in philanthropy and civic affairs and chairs several local and state boards.â ¢ Bill Wachtel. Bill is a UVM grad, attorney and founding partner of Wachtel & Masyr in New York. He is also the founder of several progressive organizations such as ‘Why Tuesday?, a non-partisan organization to increase voter turnout.â ¢ Peggy Williams. Peggy is President Amerita of Ithaca College and also served as President of Lyndon State College. Another UVM graduate, she holds several leadership positions in national organizations and promotes volunteerism, sustainability, diversity, and civil rights.â ¢ Emerson Lynn. Emerson is the editor-co-publisher of The St. Albans Messenger and co-publisher of The Milton Independent, The Essex Reporter and The Colchester Sun.â ¢ Bill Gilbert. Bill has served as a Trustee of the University of Vermont and has also served Vermont in a variety of notable public positions including Secretary of Administration for the late Gov. Richard Snelling.â ¢ Alma Arteaga. Alma is a junior at UVM majoring in Economics and Environmental Policy and Development and is active on issues impacting UVM and its students.â ¢ John Bramley will also serve as an ex-oficio member of the group.I am confident that these eight outstanding leaders in their fields will produce a thoughtful, provocative, compelling set of recommendations that the state and the University can implement in a timely manner.Let me close by reiterating my strong belief that the partnership between the University of Vermont and the state of Vermont is one that will continue to strengthen in the years ahead. UVM is an essential part of the Vermont culture, economy, and identity and will remain a top priority of the state of Vermont for my administration and many administrations to come.It is with tremendous optimism that I propose this re-examination of the relationship between the state and the University. We have a great opportunity to strengthen an already vibrant relationship. Working together, we will seize it.- 30 –last_img read more

Damen Launches CombiMeter

first_imgImage source: DamenDamen has officially launched a new range of non-radioactive density meters – the CombiMeter. On board dredgers, continuous control of the dredging efficiency is of vital importance. This is done by density measurement – continuously checking of the throughput in the dredge pipe.For several decades this measurement had to be done using a nuclear density meter, but now Damen has put a new technique to the test on an aggregate dredger, and it has passed with flying colours. As a result, the new CombiMeter is available for all new dredgers and retrofits.The CombiMeter consists of a flow meter and a density meter. For the flow meter, an electromagnetic flow meter by Krohne Altometer is used. This is a proven concept in the dredging industry. Added to this is a density meter based on electrical resistance tomography, as developed by ITS (Industrial Tomography Systems). Both are combined in an integrated production meter; the CombiMeter.Image source: DamenThe CombiMeter has undergone a series of extensive field tests in the Damen Dredging test loop, in the ¡VAMOS! mining project and lastly as a full-scale test on the CEMEX aggregate dredger Sand Falcon in a Ø700 mm pipeline.During the tests, the Sand Falcon dredged a range of materials including fine sand, coarse sand and gravel. All the tests were carried out at sea, comparing data from the new CombiMeter with that from an existing radioactive model.All data from the CombiMeter were within a 1-3% accuracy range and showed a 0.95 correlation factor with the radioactive type. All the evidence from all the tests has led to the conclusion that the CombiMeter performs excellently in this salt water environment, in both horizontal as well as vertical pipe lines, covering a wide array of soils including silt, sand and gravel.The CombiMeter will be installed on the marine aggregate dredger CEMEX Go Innovation, currently under construction at Damen Shipyards Galati.Image source: DamenCommenting the latest news, CEMEX project manager, Mr Mark Williams, said: “In keeping with the design objective of CEMEX UK Marine Ltd to build a state of the art, future-proof, aggregate dredger and to ensure the vessel’s environmental credentials, a key consideration was the elimination of potentially harmful substances. These range from toxic coatings to the radioactive source found in a conventional nuclear density meter that would prevent the new build vessel achieving an ECO notation from Lloyds Register, this being a first in the UK marine aggregate industry.”Full results of all the tests the CombiMeter has undergone will be presented at the WEDA Dredging Summit and Expo in Chicago, on the 7 June 2019.Damen, ITS and Krohne will be present to launch the CombiMeter to the dredging industry.last_img read more

Cricket News MS Dhoni unlikely to return for South Africa T20s as selectors ready to persist with Rishabh Pant

first_imgNew Delhi: MS Dhoni may have put his international retirement on hold but he is unlikely to be selected for India’s three-match T20 home series against South Africa starting September 15 in Dharamsala. The team for the series is expected to be picked on September 4. The remaining two games will be played at Mohali (September 18) and Bengaluru (September 22).In all likelihood, the squad that blanked West Indies 3-0 is likely to be retained (subject to fitness) and the selection committee wants to continue building towards World T20 in Australia in October 2020.”There are only 22 T20 Internationals before India play their first World T20 game and selectors are clear in their vision that it’s time to move forward,” a senior BCCI official privy to developments in selection committee told PTI on Wednesday.”They are planning on getting a pool of three keepers ready for limited overs, especially T20s,” he added.It is still not clear whether the BCCI brass or the selection committee will speak to Dhoni to enquire about his plans like they did before the West Indies tour when the former captain informed that he would be taking a break to serve his regiment in Territorial Army.”Retirement is an individual decision and selectors or for that matter, no one has any right to decide on that front. But they have every right to decide the roadmap for the 2020 World T20 and that’s to give Rishabh Pant maximum chances,” the official explained.It is learnt that the second and third option for the selection committee is Sanju Samson, whose batting is considered to be on par with Pant and India A regular Ishan Kishan. While Pant remains the first choice across formats, the selectors are also factoring in the fitness and workload management.A few members of the selection committee will be in Thiruvananthapuram for the A series and Samson’s performance will be keenly watched as he has made the squad for the last two List A games.As far as batting is concerned, the selection committee believes that Samson is ready for top level cricket but his wicket-keeping is still work in progress.”Pant scored a fifty in the last T20 that he played. Ishan Kishan is in the A set-up. Do we even have an option of looking back when we need consistent big hitters on big Australian grounds?” the official questioned. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more