ID-4-PAPD: Greasing Our Development Wheels: Why Accurate Identification Matters So Much Today

first_imgWhy Accurate Identification Matters So Much TodayBy J. Tiah Nagbe, MSF, ChFC After months of planning and waiting, it is finally here: our special column on Liberia’s identification system. I do hope you enjoy this ride and I promise to be the best driver that I can be. I also expect others to jump in sometime and help me; and, if that happens, we should travel far and long – for about six months. For the first mile of the journey – our first article, we will look at the reason why accurate identification is so important to our lives today. If we do this very well, it will help you to understand the rest of the trip. Fasten your seat belts and welcome on board!Having plenty people has good and bad sidesThose of us who believe in God start the story of the human race with one man – Adam. Those who believe in the theory of evolution will also have to start theirs with one person at some point in time.  But from this one person we now have about 7.7 billion people that move around this one earth today. I don’t know how to explain 7.7 billion in simple terms. Even if I say that it is 1,500 times the population of Liberia, it will still not be simple for many people. So, just know that human beings are very, very, very, very plenty in the world today.  I can imagine that when Adam and his family lived on this earth, their life was simple in many ways, including finding people who broke the law. For example, when Adam found out that someone had eaten the forbidden fruit, it had to be quite easy to determine that it was Eve, since only two of them lived on the earth at the time. Similarly, when Abel was murdered by his brother Caine, it had to be simple finding out the murderer. So, in a way, we can say that having a small population was a good thing. However, we may never have reached the level of human development that we see today, had we remained as small as Adam’s family. Think about it, could that first family have invented the airplane? Did they even have the need for it? Which airport would they have flown it to and who would have built that airport? Also, could they have invented the cell phone? Would there have been a need for a phone in the first place, to call whom? Therefore, we can see that a huge population has come with many great things as well.But a large population is a two-sided coin, with both good and bad sides. The good side includes the fantastic human development. However, the bad side includes difficulties in fighting crimes, providing services to people, and more. One such challenge that a large population has brought about is how to accurately identify people. This problem is made more difficult by the fact that we demand speedy solutions and transact business in places that are far from where we live.  Among many areas in which this comes to play are banking, insurance and telecommunication services in the private sector; and salary payments, election, education, health care, electricity and water services for the public sector. Allow me to demonstrate this very important need for accurate identification with one example, using the banking sector. NID helps Sia to withdraw money from the bankA nice lady, called Sia Tamba, operated a large farm in Foya, Lofa County (149 miles/240 kilometers from Monrovia) for several years and then decided to move to Monrovia when her children grew older and started college. While in Foya, she saved a good amount of money with the local branch of a bank call Liberia Bank. The bank had only two tellers at that branch and they both knew Sia because Foya is a small community. Whenever she went to deposit or withdraw money at the local branch, the tellers simply carried out the transaction without asking her for an identification, because they were very sure she was Sia. In fact, they knew her entire family and had visited her house several times for special occasions, like Christmas and birthdays. When Sia moved to Monrovia, she joined a population of 1.5 million people. To start a business in Monrovia, she visited the branch of the Liberia Bank to withdraw LRD 300,000. At the bank she faced a problem: unlike the Foya tellers, the Monrovia tellers did not know her. Therefore, when she presented the withdrawal slip for LRD300,000 the teller refused to pay without proper identification. First, she took out an ID from her Susu (savings) club in Foya, but that did not work. Then she asked the teller to call their branch in Foya about her. The teller said he did not have much time to make a call because there were others waiting in the line, and even a call would not convince him because the Foya teller was not present to confirm that the lady standing in front of him is the same Sia who has the money in the bank. So she did not get the money on that day.The next day she went to the National Identification Registry office and applied for a biometric national ID card. After receiving the card three days later, she went back to the bank and re-submitted her withdrawal slip. The bank teller took her national ID card and entered the ID number into his computer. Within a few seconds, the big NIR computer sent Sia’s information to the bank and the teller’s computer screen showed the picture and other important information about Sia. This convinced the teller that the person standing before him was indeed Sia Tamba. The teller made the payment and went home knowing that he would not get in trouble; and Sia got her money to start her new business in Monrovia. Yes, unique ID mattersI do hope that this story helps you to see the challenges that come with very large populations and the solutions that unique identification brings to the table in solving some of these challenges. As you can see in Sia’s case, three situations made it difficult to serve her. The first was the fact that by moving to Monrovia she became part of a very large population within which many people do not know each other, like in Foya. The second situation is that she had traveled far from her original community; therefore, it was difficult to verify her story by asking tellers in Foya. This is a problem that happens every day as people travel outside of their communities, cities, counties or even countries. The third situation is that today we demand speedy services. When she was carrying out the transaction, there had to be others standing behind her demanding to be served quickly. Therefore, the teller did not have the time to call the Foya branch and ask his co-workers to tell him more about Sia, to see if he could verify some information that would convince him that this lady was the owner of the account. It was a biometric ID that provided high degree of certainty that out of the 5 million people that live in Liberia, this lady was the one and only Sia Tamba, the person who had deposited her money with the Liberia Bank in Foya.  Next week, we will look at how unique identification is created for each person and how it helps to solve problems for different institutions and sectors of our society.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Duke Of Cambridge Visits Centrepoint Hostel In London

first_imgThe Duke of Cambridge, Patron of Centrepoint, the leading youth homelessness charity for 16-25 year-olds, recently visited a hostel in London.Prince William at CentrepointCredit/Copyright: Royal.UKThe Duke spent time meeting young people who rely on the charity to help them turn their lives around.As well as providing homeless young people with a safe place to stay, the work of Centrepoint focuses on providing young people with help to tackle physical and mental health problems and support in accessing education and work.On his visit to a Centrepoint hostel, The Duke of Cambridge observed some of the Centrepoint sessions designed for young people, and took the opportunity to hear about the personal experiences of those attending the programme.The support of Centrepoint can make a huge difference to the future of homeless young people, who are four times more likely to not be in education, employment or training than non-homeless peers. Centrepoint offers a wide range of support to help young people enter the world of work, particularly through Workwise, a four-week programme which has been specifically designed to help homeless young people overcome barriers to finding and keeping a job.The Duke spent time with staff who run the hostel, and colleagues from Centrepoint’s Learning Team who provide workshops and training sessions.Centrepoint supports 9,000 young people directly in London, Yorkshire and the North East, and through its partner charities across the UK. Young people typically stay with Centrepoint for around two years, with 90 per cent moving on positively.Centrepoint aims to help all young people find a job and a home, so they can leave homelessness behind for good. For more information about Centrepoint visit their website.Source:Royal.UKlast_img read more

WHATS SHOOTING IN BC – AS OF JUL072017 – LINKS BY UBCPACTRA

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Advertisement CREATIVE BC – CLICK HERE.LOOKING FOR A JOB?  CHECK OUT OUR CASTING, JOB & CREW NOTICESCASTING NOTICES: CLICK HERECREW & JOB NOTICES: CLICK HERE.ARE YOU CREW?ARE YOU A PRODUCTION COMPANY?DO YOU PROVIDE A SERVICE TO THE INDUSTRY?Register & List your company in the FREE eBOSS PRODUCTION DIRECTORYCLICK HERE————FOLLOW eBOSS CANADA  The Entertainment Business One-Stop ShopFacebook: https://www.facebook.com/eboss.canada/Twitter: https://twitter.com/eBOSSCanadaInstagram: https://www.instagram.com/eBOSSCanada/YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCM1DvYkRJ2YXSrJXJ7-3f0A Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: Facebook Film & TV Productions currently filming in BCUBCP/ACTRA – FILM/TV PRODUCTION LIST – CLICK HERE – 5-PAGE PDFUBCP/ACTRA – ULTRA LOW BUDGET PRODUCTION LIST – CLICK HERElast_img read more

Canadas treatment of Indigenous women not a genocide Andrew Scheer

first_img“It does not fall into the category of genocide,” says Conservative leader Andrew Scheer. Photo: APTN file.The Canadian Press“Genocide” isn’t the right word to describe what’s been done to generations of Indigenous women and girls in Canada, Conservative Leader Andrew Scheer said Monday.“I believe that, as most Canadians do, that every single life lost is a tragedy, has a huge impact on families and loved ones and that there are concrete things the government can do, that all levels of government can do, to help protect vulnerable people in our society, specifically Indigenous women and girls,” Scheer said on Parliament Hill.“That being said, the ramifications of the term ‘genocide’ are very profound. That word and term carries a lot of meaning. I think the tragedy involved with missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls is its own thing, it is its own tragedy, and does not fall into that category of genocide.”The federal inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls released its final report a week ago. The report says that under international law, a genocide doesn’t need a single directing mind, or to be an organized campaign of violence.The inquiry’s four commissioners included a long separate argument for why Canada’s “series of actions and omissions,” from residential schools to poor health care to unsafe transportation to indifferent or even hostile policing, have allowed Indigenous women to be targeted in numerous ways that add up to what they called an ongoing genocide.“Canada has displayed a continuous policy, with shifting expressed motives but an ultimately steady intention, to destroy Indigenous Peoples physically, biologically, and as social units,” through oppressive colonial actions that have persisted since Europeans began settling, the commissioners’ argument says.The inquiry report says it’s impossible to count the number of missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada accurately. One reckoning by the RCMP found 1,186 applicable cases in its files over the past 30 years alone. The Mounties do not police the whole country, not every missing person is reported and not every death becomes a police matter.The use of the term “genocide” in the report instantly sparked arguments over whether the inquiry commissioners’ label is accurate and whether those arguments risk obscuring their other findings and the 231 recommendations they made.Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has not directly answered questions about whether he agrees with that, though he has said he accepts the findings of the report.Canada signed on to the United Nations’ 1948 Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, which included commitments to avert and stop genocidal acts and to punish perpetrators. After the latest inquiry report was released, the secretary general of the Organization of American States said he wanted to form an international panel to investigate the claim and achieve justice.On Sunday, Crown-Indigenous Relations Minister Carolyn Bennett told Global Television’s “The West Block” that the Liberal government would support such a call because it believes in the “rules-based international system.”“The idea that Canada would now be subject to the types of international actions that follow findings of genocide, I think we have to be very careful with the use of that terminology and I don’t want to get distracted from the good work that the report has done,” Scheer said.“But that being said, I think that the tragedy is its own thing, it is its own heartbreaking situation for every single family that was affected by it, and it does not fall into the category of genocide.”news@aptn.ca@aptnnewslast_img read more