2 in Jail over Minister Sandolo’s ‘Assassination Plot’

first_imgTwo of the five persons arrested in connection with an alleged plot to assassinate Mr. Patrick Sandolo, Minister of Lands, Mines and Energy (LME) at his Todee farm are yet to appear in court. The two are currently in detention at the Monrovia Central Prison, nearly three months after they were charged by the Liberia National Police (LNP).Police charged the defendants based on a complaint from one Alvin Nelson, who is believed to be the caretaker of the Minister’s farm, a court document in the possession of the Daily Observer said.Though Minister Sandolo was not at the farm when the incident took place on July 24, the defendants are being charged with multiple crimes, including criminal conspiracy, armed robbery, theft of property, burglary, criminal mischief and criminal attempt to commit murder, which under the law is a non bailable offence.Defendants Anthony Mulbah along with Arthur Gono, Alex Gbato, Kpannah Tosh and Abraham Kollie were arrested by police due to a writ of arrest issued by Francis K. Fayiah, stipendiary magistrate of the Careysburg Magisterial Court, in Montserrado County, where the alleged offenses were committed.Alex Gbato and Abraham Kollie are the two persons currently detained at the Monrovia Central Prison awaiting trial, while the other three have been released.Mr. Dominic Kollie, the father of one of the defendants, Abraham Kollie, who spoke with journalists at the Temple of Justice, tearfully explained, “My son has been in jail since July 26 on multiple crimes and he still has not had a court date set. I have talked to the Magisterial Court and still have not had a court date set.“Is there any length of time that he can be held without a court date?“I am afraid that he is lost in the system. I tried calling Minister Sandolo, (but he) referred me to the court. I am getting nowhere fast. And they are still behind bars at the Central Prison.”He also used the occasion to appeal for government’s intervention to have them go to court.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Variations in finestructure constant suggest laws of physics not the same everywhere

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. An X-ray image of the quasar PKS 1127-145, located about 10 billion light-years from Earth. Credit: NASA. The physicists, John Webb from the University of New South Wales and his coauthors from Swinburne University of Technology and the University of Cambridge, used data from two telescopes to uncover the spatial dependence of the fine-structure constant. Using the north-facing Keck telescope in Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the south-facing Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Paranal, Chile, the researchers observed more than 100 quasars, which are extremely luminous and distant galaxies that are powered by massive black holes at their centers.By measuring the quasar spectra, the researchers could gather data on the frequency of the electromagnetic radiation emitted by quasars at high redshifts, corresponding to a time about 10 billion years ago. During the time the light traveled through space to reach the telescopes, some of it was absorbed at specific wavelengths by very old gas clouds that today can reveal the chemical composition of the clouds. The cloud compositions could help the scientists determine the fine-structure constant in those areas of the universe at that time, since alpha is a measure of the strength of the electromagnetic force between electrically charged particles. As the coupling constant for the electromagnetic force, it is similar to the constants for the other three known fundamental forces of nature: the strong nuclear force, the weak nuclear force, and gravitational force. Among its important implications, alpha determines how strongly atoms hold on to their electrons. By combining the data from the two telescopes that look in opposite directions, the researchers found that, 10 billion years ago, alpha seems to have been larger by about one part in 100,000 in the southern direction and smaller by one part in 100,000 in the northern direction. The data for this “dipole” model of alpha has a statistical significance of about 4.1 sigma, meaning that that there is only a one in 15,000 chance that it is a random event. Play This video shows the path of light as a beam as it travels from the quasar, through an intervening galaxy and then to the Earth where we capture it with our telescopes. The inset shows the quasar spectrum as it is redshifted (due to the expansion of the universe as it travels) and as it is imprinted with the absorption signature of the intervening galaxy. • PhysOrg.com iPhone / iPad Apps• PhysOrg.com Audio Podcasts / iTunes• PhysOrg.com Android apps (new version available)• Join PhysOrg.com on Facebook!• Follow PhysOrg.com on Twitter! Explore further PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQuality0SpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreen Illustration of the dipolar variation in the fine-structure constant, alpha, across the sky, as seen by the two telescopes used in the work: the Keck telescope in Hawaii and the ESO Very Large Telescope in Chile. Copyright Dr. Julian Berengut, UNSW, 2010. May be used with appropriate attribution.center_img Explained: Why many surveys of distant galaxies miss 90 percent of their targets At first, the data surprised Webb and his colleagues, since it seemed to contradict previous results that the scientists had published in 1999. At that time, the scientists had used the north-facing Keck telescope to find that alpha became slightly smaller the further away (and older) the quasars were. So when the scientists first looked at equally distant quasars from the southern hemisphere using the VLT, they were surprised to find the slight increase in alpha. After eliminating any possible bias, though, they realized that they were looking at hemispherical differences of alpha.While the data from just one telescope seemed to suggest that alpha varies in time, data from the two telescopes show that alpha also seems to vary in space. Such a discovery could have major implications, starting with shattering the basic assumption that physical laws are the same everywhere in the universe. The results also violate the Einstein Equivalence Principle, and suggest that the universe may be much larger than currently thought – or even infinite in size. Right now, the scientists want to confirm the results with other experimental methods, and see if the fine-structure constant could truly lead scientists to a very different understanding of our universe. (PhysOrg.com) — One of the most controversial questions in cosmology is why the fundamental constants of nature seem fine-tuned for life. One of these fundamental constants is the fine-structure constant, or alpha, which is the coupling constant for the electromagnetic force and equal to about 1/137.0359. If alpha were just 4% bigger or smaller than it is, stars wouldn’t be able to make carbon and oxygen, which would have made it impossible for life as we know it to exist. Now, results from a new study show that alpha seems to have varied a tiny bit in different directions of the universe billions of years ago, being slightly smaller in the northern hemisphere and slightly larger in the southern hemisphere. One intriguing possible implication is that the fine-structure constant is continuously varying in space, and seems fine-tuned for life in our neighborhood of the universe. Citation: Variations in fine-structure constant suggest laws of physics not the same everywhere (2010, September 6) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2010-09-variations-fine-structure-constant-laws-physics.html More information: J. K. Webb, et al. “Evidence for spatial variation of the fine structure constant.” Submitted to Physical Review Letters. Available at arXiv:1008.3907v1 [astro-ph.CO] © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

Top Stories

first_img Top Stories The 5: Takeaways from the Coyotes’ introduction of Alex Meruelo The cuts just keep on coming.The Arizona Cardinals announced Monday they have released running back Beanie Wells.The move comes as a bit of a shock but not all that big of a surprise, as Wells had a very rocky four years in the desert.Just been informed that I’ll be released today. Would like to thank the Cardinals organization for give me a chance to live out my Dreams— Beanie Wells (@BeanieWells26) March 11, 2013 Comments   Share   Former Cardinals kicker Phil Dawson retirescenter_img Derrick Hall satisfied with D-backs’ buying and selling Taken with the 31st pick in the 2009 NFL Draft, Wells showed promise as a rookie when he rushed for 793 yards and seven touchdowns. After a down 2010, Wells ran for 1,047 yards and 10 touchdowns in 2011, but his production dropped in 2012 in large part due to injuries and ineffectiveness.He played in just eight games, rushing for 234 yards and five touchdowns. Grace expects Greinke trade to have emotional impactlast_img read more