College hosts lecture on global learning

first_imgColleges must follow through on their promises of global education, R. Michael Paige, professor of International and Intercultural Education at the University of Minnesota, said. In his lecture, “Global Learning and the Intercultural Dimension of Internationalization,” delivered at Saint Mary’s College on Friday, Paige said universities promise perspective students a global education, but rarely go beyond the promise. “Many times universities say they prepare globally perspective students, but the evidence is just not there,” he said. “The rhetoric often exceeds the practices.” In order to follow through on these promises, Paige said faculty members must encourage their students to study abroad. “Studying abroad stands as a beacon for students,” Paige said. “It is continuously listed as the most influential instrument in a student’s higher education learning experience. A real solid undergraduate education involves academic study abroad.” Paige said faculty must question how they can prepare and support their students’ global perspectives. “[Faculty must] foster a learning environment that prepares students to fully participate in the global community,” Paige said. “Colleges must have internationalization permeate the climate of learning.” Incorporating global learning into the curriculum will also make classes more engaging, he said. “Internationalization must be seen in the curriculum,” Paige said. “This aspect of learning makes courses more exciting and students love courses with an international dimension. We must be thinking how we teach and how we can enhance our student’s overall education.” Marc Belanger, professor of Political Science at Saint Mary’s, said he agrees with Paige’s perspective. “[Global learning] is important because today’sstudents simply will not be successful without an understanding of the global forces which impact how they live and work,” he said. “I have long believed it was our responsibility as humans to be globally aware.”last_img read more

Belles invite fathers for Senior Dads Weekend

first_imgMembers of the Saint Mary’s class of 2014 and their fathers enjoyed events at Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame this weekend during the College’s annual Senior Dads Weekend. Susie Larson, vice president of the 2014 class board, who helped organize the event, said the board worked hard to find an open weekend for this event since last spring, because it had to account for the numerous events on campus and the football schedule. Larson said there was a great deal of interest in all of the scheduled events, which resulted in a large turnout from the senior class and their fathers. “The weekend had 280 students register and our class is 298 strong, so we were extremely excited about the turnout,” Larson said.  Student body president Kat Sullivan said the class board did a good job of including the entire senior class community. “Regardless of who the father figure is in a girl’s life, the class board made sure the events were welcoming to all, including some mothers,” Sullivan said.  The weekend’s events opened with a beer garden and silent auction Friday evening in the College’s Student Center.  Sullivan said the event included an open bar with all types of beer and wine, and the silent auction was filled with donated items from the fathers. “Whatever money that was made from the auction was then given to the class of 2014’s board, so it was a great way to fundraise for future class events,” Sullivan said.  “Also, everyone who went got a beer sty with a French cross on it and little koozies with bowties on them to commemorate the weekend.” On Saturday, the College Archives and the Riedinger House were open for morning tours. Sullivan said this helped the girls to share their College’s history with their fathers.  Senior Bridget Byrne said the tours of Notre Dame Stadium on Saturday afternoon were one of her favorite parts of the weekend, as well as a watch party for the Notre Dame vs. ASU game at CJ’s Bar later that evening. “I have always loved watching games with my Dad, so this was something special for us to do together before graduation,” Byrne said. “It was also so fun to do push-ups in CJ’s during the game watch, and I know all of my friends were really looking forward to this weekend after all of the fun we had at Junior Mom’s Weekend last spring.” The weekend culminated with Mass in the Chapel of the Holy Spirit in Le Mans Hall on Saturday night, Sullivan said.  At the Mass, Saint Mary’s students and their fathers celebrated their relationships.  The celebrant, Fr. John Pearson, stressed the importance of letting their parents know how grateful the students were for their love and support, Sullivan said.  “Fr. John talked a lot about making sure us girls recognized that our fathers make sacrifices for us not because they’re expecting a thank you, but because they love us,” Sullivan said. “I think that that really resonated with a lot of girls and their fathers that were present.” The parent weekends at Saint Mary’s are among many students’ favorite traditions on campus, Larson said. “I am a strong supporter in how Saint Mary’s organizes their parent weekends throughout our four years on campus because I think it reflects our experience growing as young women,” she said. Contact Caroline Stickell at [email protected]last_img read more

Off-campus thefts reported

first_imgResidents of three separate student housing units reported burglaries before the start of the spring semester, according to a Jan. 21 email sent from Notre Dame’s Off Campus Council.One burglary reportedly occurred in the 1500 block of Turtle Creek Drive between Dec. 12 and Jan. 11. Entry was gained by unknown means, and a 42-inch Samsung television was taken, the email stated. Suspect information is not available.Another burglary occurred between Dec. 20,  and Jan. 10, this time in the 800 block of East Washington Street. Entry was gained by unknown means, and the email stated that a 32-inch Vizio television and an Xbox 360 were taken. Suspect information is not available.The third burglary reportedly occurred in the 1600 block of Turtle Creek Court between Oct. 21, and Oct. 27. Entry was gained through an unlocked sliding rear door, and a 60-inch Sony flat screen television was taken, according to the email.  Suspect information is not available.In the email, the Off Campus Council directed students to the Notre Dame Police Department’s website for more information on crime prevention. A live crime map of Notre Dame, South Bend and Mishawaka is available at www.crimereports.com/agency/nd Tags: Crime, Off Campus, South Bend, winter breaklast_img read more

Irish performance impresses fans

first_imgNotre Dame’s narrow, last-second defeat of Louisiana State University (LSU) in the Franklin American Mortgage Music City Bowl capped off the 2014 football season in dramatic fashion, much to the delight of local fans and those venturing to Nashville, Tennessee, from nearby midwestern and southeastern states.“It was great to see my school’s football team playing so close to home,” junior and Nashville native Jessica Zic said. “Also, I was excited to see that the Notre Dame football team practiced at my high school’s football stadium during the days leading up to the game.”Junior Lauren Pate, who hails from Memphis, Tennessee, said she jumped at the chance to attend the Dec. 30 bowl game because she missed the football season studying abroad in Kampala, Uganda. She said she made the three-hour trip in the morning with other Memphians and had enough time to walk around and enjoy live music in downtown Nashville before the game.“I didn’t really keep track of the 2014 football season because I was abroad, but I had heard about the ending of the Northwestern game, so it had me nervous for the ending of the Music City Bowl,” Pate said. “We won though, so I was very happy for that and glad it was the game I got to see for the end of the 2014 season.”Freshman Katharine Janes traveled with her family from Michigan and said the atmosphere at the game differed noticeably from a typical Notre Dame football experience.“The game day experience was incredible. The stadium was alive with excited football fans, and it was so much fun to reconnect with friends from school that you didn’t know you would be running into 600 miles away from home,” she said. “… I sat in a few parts of the stadium — ranging from directly off the LSU sideline to the upper bowl on the ND side — but I think that all parts felt incredibly energized.“It was definitely a different experience than watching a home game from the student section, but it was the best of both worlds to be able to watch part of the game with my family in the stands yet also experience other parts with students from ND.”Pate said she sat in the student section, right next to the Band of the Fighting Irish. She said the section was “very small but nonetheless lively.”“All of the fans seemed very excited despite the cold, and very engaged with the band and cheerleaders in all the cheers and songs,” she said.Senior Russell King, a drum major in the Band of the Fighting Irish, said the band practiced once in Nashville before their halftime show which featured versions of Ariana Grande’s “Break Free” and Europe’s “The Final Countdown.”“It was cold, but we have fantastic fans who braved the weather to come support us [at practice before the bowl],” King said. “There were about 100 fans who came out that morning. The band had not marched in about a month so it was a well-needed rehearsal to polish the show.”The band participated in several pre-game events in downtown Nashville leading up to the bowl game, including a battle of the bands with LSU’s band, King said.“The actual game is only a small part of the Music City Bowl experience,” he said. “A subset of the band played at the ACC Pep Rally, the Alumni Kick-Off at the Rock Bottom Brewery and a ND tailgate at the Acme Feed & Seed.“However, by far the largest event was the Battle of the Bands. Thousands of people showed up to support both our band and the LSU Marching Tigers. Both bands marched side-by-side but in opposite directions on the main street of Nashville.“Then, the bands faced each other and went back and forth with our best songs. In my opinion, the knockout punch came with another stellar singing performance of ‘Ooh Poo Pah Doo’ by sophomore clarinetist Michelle Mann. However, LSU countered with their best song and the battle was declared a tie.”Sophomore Kristen Ochs, who came from Ohio for the game, said the team’s performance in the last seconds of the game, especially senior kicker Kyle Brindza’s field goal in the last four seconds that put the Irish up 31-28, left her optimistic for the prospects of the 2015 season.“I think this game allowed for a brighter end to what many might call a disappointing season,” she said. “Clearly, things can change quickly since we started out so well with high hopes and didn’t end very well at all.”Pate said the team demonstrated more poise than she had expected.“My biggest takeaway was the true grit of our team and how well they performed under the pressure of the game,” Pate said. “I was very impressed. I’m looking forward to seeing how this win will transfer over to next season. I’m hoping it’ll give us a boost of confidence to start and finish the season strong.”Tags: bowl game, Fighting Irish, football, Kyle Brindza, Music City Bowl, Nashvillelast_img read more

SMC TOMS club interviews founder

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Nora Clougherty Members of the TOMS club at Saint Mary’s Skyped with TOMS Shoes founder Blake Mycoskie during his TED talk Thursday.The TOMS company, through its “One for One” model, donates a pair of shoes to the poor in third-world countries every time someone buys a pair of its shoes. When someone purchases TOMS eyewear, a part of the profit goes to help restore sight to those who are poor. A new addition to the One for One organization is TOMS tote bags. Every time one is sold, a new bag, along with a safe home birth kit, is given to a pregnant mother in need of one.“For a long time, TOMS just provided shoes,” Mycoskie said. “We now have factories in Haiti and Kenya. We try to continually stretch the boundary of our company to create jobs.”Martin Burt, the founder and CEO of Fundacion Paraguaya (FP), which receives and distributes donated shoes, also Skyped in with Mycoskie and the Saint Mary’s club.“We are using TOMS not as charity but as self-help,” he said. “It is self-help and self-reliance that gets people out of poverty.”Burt, who founded FP in 1985, works to provide education in entrepreneurship and microcredit to students in Paraguay. At the moment, he is creating schools specifically for rural youth who are chronically unemployed, as well as developing the “Poverty Stoplight,” which uses technology to help poor families understand their economic position and work to improve it.“Our bottom line is impact, not poverty,” he said. “We try to design ways to diminish poverty.”TOMS club president Nora Clougherty said it was rewarding to speak to both Mycoskie and Burt, whose foundation, as a TOMS giving partner, directly uses the shoes.“We were not only able to witness how the shoes are being put to use, but we also got to talk to someone who was directly impacting TOMS,” she said.In response to a question from the Saint Mary’s club, Mycoskie said the biggest challenge was just making the shoes while keeping one question in mind.“How do you preserve a culture of giving as you scale a big business?” he said.Mycoskie said another major obstacle was keeping in mind the purpose of TOMS creation.“The challenge was in keeping the whole organization excited and focused on why we do what we do,” Mycoskie said. “More important is the mindset that we’re changing.”Burt said a partial obstacle to eliminating poverty is that people sometimes forget that poverty exists.“It’s not that the poor are invisible — we do not see,” Burt said. “We can transform the world and end poverty in one generation just with the TOMS shoe example, but it is impossible for people to see the solutions that are right under our nose.”Burt said TOMS is a good model because it can be applied beyond just shoes.“This is about social innovation, taking what works in one industry and applying it to another industry,” he said.Clougherty said the conversation inspired the club to continue to spread its message.“My goal is to one day see everyone on campus wearing TOMS so that we can see the change a simple purchase can have,” she said.Another club member, Delaney Hunt, said talking to Mycoskie helped her to consider the service aspect of business.“Talking to somebody that has that reputation and is so well-known makes it more real,” she said. “It makes me believe in their mission even more — it makes it more personal. The business model itself is interesting in that you could apply it to anything. It gives me ideas on what you can do with a normal business major.”Club member Tori Wilbraham said Mycoskie’s talk was particularly impactful as she prepares to graduate.“He inspired me to follow my passions rather than pursue a career for money,” Wilbraham said.last_img read more

Student government hosts fair for freshmen

first_imgThe First Undergraduate Experience in Leadership (FUEL) branch of student government hosted the Freshman Networking Fair on Monday in the Lafortune Ballroom to help first year students connect with various organizations across campus.Sarah Olson Sophomore Dan Hopkinson, co-director of FUEL, said the fair was started three years ago when FUEL was under the leadership of Louis Bertolotti and it has continued to gather positive feedback throughout the years.“ … Especially if you’re a freshman, it’s hard to [join organizations] if you’re not already involved in student government,” he said. “It can be overwhelming, so I think just having an event dedicated to specifically Student Union organizations is helpful in raising awareness for those organizations and what they can do.”Senior Caitlin Hodges, department director for community relations, said freshmen can reach out to her to learn more about jobs and service in the South Bend community. The experience in community relations her department offers can also be a valuable experience for those looking to get involved in local government, she said. “If they’re looking for good exposure even to municipal government, if it’s someone who’s thinking about getting involved in that after graduation in South Bend or another city — this is a really good department for that,” Hodges said. Freshman Alison O’Neil, who is involved with community relations, said she has enjoyed her experience, which allows her to venture into the South Bend community.“This is my first experience with student government,” O’Neil said. “ … It’s a nice chance to get out of the Notre Dame bubble, get involved in the community and really make a difference.”Liz Feeley, co-chair of Hall President’s Council (HPC), said freshmen can also begin becoming involved with the hall council organizations within their own dorms.“When they come in their freshmen year [and want to become involved with HPC], it’s probably most helpful if they get involved in hall council first, because HPC is made up of current hall presidents,” Feeley said. “It’s kind of hard to run, unless you have one year under your belt … We would definitely recommend hall council, and even running for a commissioner’s position.”Christina Fernandez, co-chair of the HPC, said freshmen can shadow their upperclassmen hall presidents to learn more about the responsibilities of the position “Some halls have junior commissioner positions, so [freshmen] can learn how to be a commissioner under a sophomore and learn the ropes of programming and what we do at events,” Fernandez said. “But aside from that, freshmen can actually run for president at the end of their freshmen year to be hall president during their sophomore year, so we have a few of the halls who have sophomore presidents.”Freshman Abby Campbell, a member of FUEL, said she learned more about student government through the fair.“I discovered that the school offers a free New York Times subscription, which I sort of knew but I had no idea how to take advantage of it,” Campbell said. “Also, I didn’t know that student government was the group that worked on the debate this year and also [kept] track of who voted for who in the [mock] election, which is pretty cool.”Freshman Brittani West said she was particularly interested in the opportunities which Diversity Council offered.“I checked out Diversity Council, so that was pretty interesting,” West said. “I know that the majority of students here are white, so not being white, I wanted to check that out, for sure. I’m really glad they’re offering opportunities for me to be a part of that council.”Freshman Taylor Schmidt said he learned about future events that are aimed at fostering community between residence halls. “There’s going to be a campus-wide event that entails competitions with each dorm … you can go to different dorms for activities; [for example,] you can do dunk tanks at Duncan Hall or make a cupcake at Badin,” Schmidt said.Hodges said he hoped the fair would help spread overall awareness of the opportunities offered by student government.“Student Union is the largest organization that is on campus and it can do so much,” Hodges said. “It can be overwhelming so I think just having an event dedicated to specifically Student Union organizations is helpful in raising awareness for those organizations and what they can do.”Tags: fair, freshmen, networking, Student Unionlast_img read more

Campus Ministry, dorms celebrate Las Posadas

first_imgFor the past five years, the Notre Dame community has marked the coming of the Christmas season with an annual tradition of Las Posadas. During this year’s celebration, students and others in attendance will meet at the Grotto at 9 p.m. on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday nights for a walk, prayer, singing and food.Las Posadas, which is Spanish for “the inns,” reenacts a passage from the Gospel of Luke where Mary and Joseph search for shelter before Jesus is born, Becky Ruvalcaba, assistant director of multicultural ministry in Campus Ministry, said in an email.“[It] is an advent celebration revolving around the concept of hospitality,” she said. “ … We learn from the Posadas that by welcoming the poor and the needy, we are welcoming Jesus in our midst.”The walk will end at Stanford Hall on Monday night, the Coleman-Morse Center on Tuesday night and Farley Hall on Wednesday night.Junior Audrey Immonen, the spirituality commissioner for Farley Hall, said in an email that the event will feature one leader, three readers and two people to play Mary and Joseph.Ruvalcaba said the tradition is typical in Latin American countries and is usually held the nine days before Christmas.Besides Campus Ministry, Ruvalcaba said Farley and Stanford Halls play large roles in the event, but people from across campus participate.Campus Ministry plans the date at least two months in advance and then coordinates with Farley to set the locations each night, Immonen said.. She plans for the night when Farley hosts.“I recruit Farley’s Finest to read Bible passages and play Mary and Joseph,” she said. “We also order delicious Venezuelan food from the Mango Cafe here in South Bend — the night is full of empanadas, arepas and hot chocolate.”Elaine DeBassige, the rector of Farley, helped bring the tradition to campus several years ago.“I come from a state and culture that celebrates their faith through pilgrimage at Advent and Lent,” she said in an email. “Pilgrimage helps us to think about the journey we all make in our faith life.”DeBassige said her family always welcomed strangers.“When we open Farley’s door to let the pilgrims in for a prayer and food, it reminds me of home and the way this cultural tradition shaped my faith,” she said.Immonen said her favorite part of the event is when people remember that Mary and Joseph were refugees.“Nowadays, refugees are vilified and marginalized, and people forget that God was once one,” she said.Ruvalcaba and Immonen both said the community is one of their favorite parts of the event as well.“This event reminds students that we are called to walk with each other on the journey,” Immonen said.DeBassige ultimately sees the celebration as a time for the campus to come together.“One of the greatest gifts of a college education is the exchange of ideas, culture and life,” she said. “These things expand who we are when we dare to share. … The table that Christ sets then becomes more accessible to more people because it is another way to access the Catholic faith.”She said that making these traditions accessible helps make strangers seem less intimidating and more like friends or family.“Isn’t that what Notre Dame is all about?” she said.Tags: christmas, Faith, Las Posadas, Pilgrimagelast_img read more

University announces temporary rector for Breen-Phillips Hall

first_imgDirector of residential life for rector recruitment, hiring and retention Breyan Tornifolio will act as the Breen-Phillips Hall interim rector throughout the rest of the spring semester, according to an email sent Friday to the Breen-Phillips community from Erin Hoffmann Harding, vice president of student affairs.Tornifolio previously supervised Sister Mary McNamara, the former rector of BP who died Feb. 7 due to complications following a stroke. According to the email, Tornifolio also served as rector of Pasquerilla East Hall from 2006 to 2009 and Ryan Hall from 2009 to 2013, for which she was the “inaugural rector.” She has taken on various leadership roles since then for the University, including being “the primary staff person for planning the University’s celebration” in honor of University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh after his death in 2015, the email said.Tornifolio, who also serves as the chaplain of the women’s basketball team, graduated from Wheeling Jesuit University with a degree in psychology and earned her masters in higher education from Geneva College. In the email, Hoffmann Harding said the University administration will hire a permanent rector for Breen-Phillips Hall this spring as part of the regular hiring cycle for new rectors.Tags: Breen-Phillips Hall, interim rector, rector, Sister Mary McNamaralast_img read more

ACE Night speakers share educational, personal outcomes of graduate program

first_imgCourtesy of Alysa Guffey Current ACE teachers living in Corpus Christi, Texas, opened the annual ACE information night with a prayer. Corpus Christ is one of 35 communities the ACE teaching fellows program serves.This year, a second option for the application process is available for students who would like to know of their acceptance decision to ACE earlier, Comuniello said. Applicants can either apply early by Nov. 3 and hear back by Christmas or apply regular decision by Jan. 19 and hear back in mid-March.Comuniello said he is proud that all 35 communities the program serves ask specifically for ACE teachers to be assigned in the community.“We’ve never gone to a diocese and asked to place teachers there, it has always been a response to the needs of that community,” Comuniello said. “So we’ve always been invited by the bishop or the superintendent, and then thereafter the principals of those schools.”Comuniello said after the teachers and schools are confirmed, the program plays “matchmaker” to align teachers’ strengths and content areas with the needs of each school. ACE teachers are split into three levels, with one-third teaching each level of elementary, middle and high school.While some ACE teachers graduate from the program and go on to fulfill a lifelong vocation of teaching, Comuniello said former ACE teachers can pursue a myriad of career paths, from medical school to law school and public service.While the online format for ACE Night did not allow for crowd interaction and conversation, interested undergraduates could hear from ACE teachers across the country who are currently in their service programs or recent graduates.The information night began with an opening prayer led by the current ACE teachers living in community with each other in Corpus Christi, Texas.Calling in on Zoom from New York City, Dan Faas, a member of ACE cohort 17, shared his experiences with the program from the two years he taught at the Most Sacred Heart of Mary High School in Mobile, Ala.“The best advice I would give you is to allow yourself to just delight in the lives of your students,” Faas said. “You have the opportunity to engage and become a part of children’s lives for two years or more.”Now a principal of a school, Faas explained his three “immutable facts” on ACE that he believes to be true.“Number one, your students will change you, if you let them,” he said. “Number two, your community will change you, if you let them. And number three, the Lord will change you, if you let him or her.”John Cunningham, a member of ACE cohort 26, spoke to audience members from Saint Joseph High School in South Bend where he currently has a full-time teaching position. Prior to teaching in South Bend, Cunningham taught middle school social studies in Mission, Texas, where he found himself immersed in the community.Cunningham recalled not knowing exactly where he would be located upon receiving his random position.“But when I looked it up [and] I realized where I was going, I was thrilled because I knew I was going to be living in a place where I would not have else lived,” he said.Cunningham connected with the community in Texas in two ways: tacos and basketball.“When I first got to the valley, I didn’t know the culture,” Cunningham said. “During my years in Mission, Texas, I took pictures of every taco I ate and I posted it on Snapchat, so I ended up with 415 tacos. I ate every one of them, and they were absolutely delicious.”Through coaching the middle school basketball team, Cunningham said he was able to connect with his students outside the classroom.“I could let my guard down as a teacher a little bit, they could let their guard down as the students and we could connect over a common bond, which is basketball, and it allowed us to really get to know each other,” Cunningham said.In addition to an educational experience, ACE teachers participate in a total of 12 retreats over the two-year commitment. The largest retreat each year convenes in December in Austin, Texas, where all teachers are invited.“[We invite] all 180 teachers across the country to celebrate with one another and to rekindle friendships, but also to pray and celebrate Mass and really recenter and ground ourselves in the why and what we’re doing,” Comuniello said.Given the relatively easy and free application process, Faas said he sees no reason for an interested student not to apply to ACE.“The process of applying for ACE is itself a form of discernment,” Faas said. “You get to discern ACE, and ACE gets to discern you.”Tags: Alliance for Catholic Education, Catholic Schools, graduate program, masters of education Instead of walking across campus to the Stinson Remick Building, students dialed in from their devices Wednesday night to learn about the teaching fellows program within The Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE) in the annual fall ACE night.The ACE fellows program allows recent college graduates to embark on two years of service by teaching in under-resourced Catholic schools while working toward a cost-free Masters of Education degree.Michael Comuniello, associate director for recruiting and a 2016 ACE graduate, said each year there are 90 to 95 teachers who accept the position in the program, totaling around 180 ACE teachers serving in any given year between the two cohorts. According to Comuniello, roughly 50% of each cohort graduated from the tri-campus community and the other 50% come from across the country.last_img read more

Number Of Active COVID-19 Cases, Those In Quarantine Rise In Chautaqua County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageJAMESTOWN – The number of active COVID-19 cases and those in quarantine made a substantial jump on Tuesday.The Chautauqua County Department of Health says there are now 17 active cases, up 13.Officials say the cases involve a woman in her teens, a woman in her 60s, a woman in her 30s, and 9 women all in their 20s.There are also 166 people under quarantine and/or isolation orders by the Public Health Director. “If you think you can’t get COVID-19, you are wrong,” said Christine Schuyler, Chautauqua County Public Health Director.  “If you make good choices, you minimize your risk of getting the virus; you also minimize the risk of passing the virus on to others if you do get it. Please use common sense and good judgement.”Officials say not all of those being monitored are confirmed to have COVID-19 but have either shown symptoms, are awaiting results, or have risk factors.Since the outbreak began there have been 150 confirmed cases of COVID-19, 126 cases recovered, 7 deaths and more than 17,000 negative test results reported.COVID-19 is believed to spread mainly from person-to-person:between people who are in close contact with one another (within 6 feet) for 10 minutes or longer or who have had physical contact through touching, shaking hands, hugging, etc.;through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, or talks;droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or be inhaled into the lungs; andby people who are not showing symptoms.last_img read more