No Need For Fishing License This Weekend

first_imgThose that haven’t fished in sometime may be lured to the waters this weekend.Adult in Indiana do not need a fishing license to fish state waters during Free Fishing Weekend, which is June 7 and 8.Clint Kowalik, DNR Go FishIN coordinator, suggested several Free Fishing Weekend options for adults and families.“Go alone to a quiet, secret spot, explore new waters with your family, or take a kid to a local fishing derby or city park pond,” Kowalik said.To celebrate Free Fishing Weekend, recreation areas across the state are planning fun fishing derbies, casting clinics, fish-cleaning demonstrations and cooking classes.Local properties and their phone numbers that are hosting activities for Free Fishing Weekend are:Brookville Lake, Brookville, (765) 647-2657Versailles State Park, Versailles, (812) 689-6424Whitewater Memorial State Park, Liberty, (765) 458-5565Children age 17 and younger do not need a fishing license in Indiana at any time. All other fishing regulations are still in effect during Free Fishing Weekend. For further information click here >>last_img read more

Mallard’s Team of the Week — LVR Bombers Sr. Girls Basketball

first_imgThe L.V. Rogers Bombers take flight this weekend to Invermere to participate in the David Thompson Lakers Invitational Girl’s Basketball Tournament. This is the first taste of East Kootenay opposition for LVR, which has attended two tournaments this season in Vernon. Staff at Mallard’s Source for Sports would like to give the girl’s grand send off with Team of the Week honours. The team includes, back row, L-R, coach Val Gibson, Erica Augsten, Brittany Wheeler, Melinda Halstead, Jayden Roch and Rachel McKenzie. Front, Samantha Einarson, Devyn Parker, Kiandra McLaren, Taryn Scarff and Kylie Mirva. Missing assistant coach Sarah Fuhr.last_img read more

‘This is a huge and sudden shock for everyone’

first_imgIn the short time he was at Mt. Sentinel, Mr. D made a huge impact on bullying, the well-being of the students, and the energy and optimism of the school. It is a shame that he died before he could make a greater impact on everybody, as I’m sure he would have. Thank you, Mr. D, for all the help and humour you’ve given us these short years.                -posted by Sylvain G. on the Mount Sentinel High School website. When someone dies we like to comfort ourselves by suggesting, “He’s in a better place now”?This one hurts so much more because Blair D’Andrea was in the prime of his life.The sad news of the passing of the Mount Sentinel VP flowed quickly through hallways of SD 8 schools.An email sent out from Mount Sentinel Pac Secretary Linda Verishine said it this way:“I am so very sad to tell you that Blair D’Andrea passed away from a massive heart attack at home on Wednesday night. This is a huge and sudden shock for everyone.”I can still hear that loud, happy voice of Drey.Hey Bruc-i-Fur . . . how’s it goin?If you didn’t hear the voice, it was easy to spot the happy man with the shaved head coming from miles away.Blair D’Andrea was a picture of happiness and what’s positive about life.The guy always looked on the bright side of life. Tomorrow was always going to be better.Whether it was at L.V. Rogers with the Aspire program, holding down the vice-principal job at Salmo where he led the mighty Falcons into battle on the hoop court or in the South Slocan where just walking down hallways at Mount Sentinel the SD 8 administrator had the kids smiling. Ditto for games at the Lakeside Ball Diamonds while pitching for his slopitch team.My first time spent getting to know Drey came when I assisted Lorne Wuori at Trafalgar coaching the Totems Grade 9 Boy’s Basketball team.Drey’s older L.V. Rogers Junior Bombers didn’t like younger Totems very much and the crosstown competition turned into one of the greatest rivalries of the ages in Nelson basketball.The Totems, unable to beat Drey’s Junior Bombers all season, got the last laugh when LVR was upset by Grand Forks in the West Kootenay High School Junior Boy’s Championship semi final.Trafalgar got past J. Lloyd Crowe before outlasting the Wolves in the final.The Totems continued their remarkable play by shocking the province and winning the B.C. Juvenile Boy’s Basketball title at the NBA Grizzlies Centre in Richmond.The next season it was Drey’s turn to coach arguably the best team in Nelson High School Basketball history.The LVR Junior Bombers overcame hurdle after hurdle, refusing to lose and surprising their coach game after game to finish the season with an amazing 38-0 record.Not a single loss against teams from the rest of the province, although there were a few potential bumps in the road.But for the most part an unblemished record as the players took to Drey like a young child to candy, capturing the provincial title in in a walk over New Westminster.Drey was most proud to share the title with Lonnie, Eric and Jason in the stands at Dover Bay High School in Nanaimo.But Drey didn’t do his best work on the basketball court, although winning a provincial title is nothing to sneeze at.Where he shined was in the classroom as a great motivator with a great heart.I saw many a wandering young mind who Drey put back onto the rails stop to give a huge “thank you” many a time.But not only was Drey a teacher, a mentor and an administrator, he was also a great father to his two boys Jason and Eric and a loving husband to his caring wife Lonnie.I know right now it’s not much comfort to anyone knowing Drey’s in a better place now.But one thing for sure, everyone who knew Drey is happy they were part of his ride.last_img read more

How to Fill In Missing Fossils: Imagine Them

first_imgHowever, as the quality and completeness of the fossil record varies considerably, both geographically and stratigraphically, palaeontologists need to find a way to ‘join the dots’ and piece together the fragments of a complex mosaic to give a more satisfactory and better picture of ancient life’s diversity.The team led by Dr Marcello Ruta of Bristol’s School of Earth Sciences … used the evolutionary relationships among known parareptiles to produce a corrected estimate of changing diversity through time.Dr Marcello Ruta said: “Evolutionary relationships can be superimposed on a time scale, allowing you to infer missing portions of past diversity.  They are powerful tools that complement and refine the known record of extinct diversity.  If you visualize evolutionary relationships in the form of branching diagrams and then plot them on a time scale, new patterns begin to emerge, with gaps in the fossil record suddenly filling rapidly.” Evolutionists have long known of systematic gaps in the fossil record.  This has been a frequent criticism lodged by Darwin skeptics against the evolutionary notion of a gradually unfolding tree of life.  Now, however, it appears that evolutionists have revived use of a tool in their arsenal for combating the critics: imagination.  Missing transitions in the record?  No problem.  Fill them in with “evolutionary thinking.”    This tactic was illustrated in a cheerful article about Dr Marcello Ruta of the University of Bristol, posted on Science Daily, describing his research into the Permian extinction – an evolutionary scenario that supposedly wiped out the majority of life forms on earth 250 million years ago.    In particular, parareptiles,1 “a diverse group of bizarre-looking terrestrial vertebrates which varied in shape and size,” had been thought to have been hit hard by the extinction event, whatever it was; but the Bristol team is now claiming that, to the contrary, “parareptiles were not hit much harder by the end-Permian extinction than at any other point in their 90 million-year history.”  They lived merrily on for another 50 million years, declining and diversifying repeatedly during their long tenure on earth.    At first glance, the article seems to score wins for Darwinism: the team at Bristol has made strides connecting the dots and filling in the gaps.  After all, they were “studying the fossil record,” the article alleged.  A closer look at their gap-filling material, however, shows it lacks empirical substance: One of the team members elaborated on the success of visualization and imagination as gap-filling strategies.  “It is as if ghosts from the past appear all of a sudden and join their relatives in a big family tree – you have a bigger tree,” he said.  “This way, you can start analysing observed and extrapolated abundance of species through time, and you can quantify novel origination and extinction events that would otherwise go unnoticed if you were to look at known finds only.”    How big a part do the known finds play in this game?  Apparently, not that much.  Another co-author of the paper emphasized the role of “evolutionary thinking” as a substitute for real bones: “Classic text-book views of waxing and waning of groups through deep time will certainly benefit, where possible, from the use of evolutionary thinking.”    A peer from the University of Washington seemed delighted with this first-ever detailed study of parareptile relationships, because “we still know very little about their biology.”  The study was published in the journal Palaeontology.2  The abstract states that they provided “Phylogeny-corrected measures of diversity” and examined “ghost lineages” – i.e., lineages that should be there if evolution were true, but left no fossils.  Paul Nelson at the Discovery Institute described ghost lineages in a pair of articles for Evolution News in January 19 and February 4, 2011.1.  The Wikipedia article on parareptilia states, “Whether the term is valid depends on the phylogenetic position of turtles, the relationships of which to other reptilian groups are still uncertain.”2.  Ruta, Cisneros et al, “Amniotes through major biological crises: faunal turnover among parareptiles and the end-Permian mass extinction,” Palaeontology, first published online: 27 APR 2011, DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-4983.2011.01051.x.It appears that the fossil evidence of parareptiles, if that taxon even exists, is a scattergram that does not support any kind of evolutionary story.  According to the abstract, “Available data are not consistent with a model of sudden decline at the end-Permian but rather suggest a rapid alternation of originations and extinctions in a number of parareptile groups, both before and after the Permian/Triassic boundary.”    One might think this anomaly amounts to a falsification of the Permian extinction idea itself, and would present a serious challenge to the idea of evolutionary progress.  But if one thought that way, one would underestimate the creativity of the Darwinian imagination.  No amount of data ever falsifies Darwinism, because imagination is always on hand to insert flexible caulking to keep the HMS Charlie afloat (see four examples from last year, 05/27/2010).  That’s why it is unsinkable.  You can’t sink an imaginary ship on an imaginary ocean hitting obstacles, real or imaginary, when magic caulk is available in infinite supply.  Read Paul Nelson’s articles and the tactic will become clear.visualizing evolutionary relationships” and filling in all the gaps with “ghost lineages” that left no trace.    This is not science; this is divination – peeping and muttering with a few bones to invoke the Spirit of Charlie, so that the peasants continue to worship and make sacrifices at the shrine of the great liberator with his magic tree, who freed the scientists from observational rigor and gave them an easy life of storytelling (12/22/2003 commentary).  Note: evolutionary thinking is an oxymoron. (Visited 8 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Integration ‘key to Africa’s growth’

first_img9 May 2013 Closer regional integration will be crucial for addressing underlying weaknesses in Africa’s long-term competitiveness and ensuring that the continent delivers on its massive growth promise, according to the Africa Competitiveness Report 2013. The report, jointly produced by the African Development Bank, the World Bank and the World Economic Forum, was released on the opening day of the World Economic Forum on Africa meeting in Cape Town on Thursday. According to the report, despite the impressive growth strides made by many African economies, the continent’s competitiveness as a whole trails other emerging regions – especially in quality of institutions, infrastructure, macroeconomic policies, education and technological adoption – while large gaps persist between its highest and lowest ranked economies. “Africa’s growth needs to be seen in the wider international context, where encouraging gains in economic growth belie an underlying weakness in its long-term competitiveness,” WEF chief economist Jennifer Blanke said in a statement on Thursday. “Regional integration is key to addressing this weakness through the delivery of wider social and economic benefits, and should be prioritised by Africa’s leaders as they look to ensure that Africa delivers on its promise.” Regional integration, according to the report, will be a key vehicle for helping Africa to diversify its economic base and create enough jobs for its young, fast-urbanising population. Gaiv Tata, Africa region director for the World Bank Group, said that Africa had been enjoying an economic transformation, with growth rates of more than 5% annually over the past decade. “To turn its economic gains into sustainable growth and shared prosperity, Africa’s public and private sectors must work together to connect the continent’s markets, deepen regional integration, and adopt reforms that enhance national competitiveness.” According to the report, Africa’s share of world trade remains low, despite numerous regional economic communities and market liberalisation at the domestic level, with intra-African trade being particularly limited. The report identifies cumbersome and non-transparent border administration, limited use of information communication technologies, and a persistent infrastructure deficit as the major barriers to higher levels of regional integration. Africa’s infrastructure deficit is identified as a particularly serious impediment, made more pronounced by growth in consumer markets and urbanisation. “Developing adequate and efficient infrastructure will assist African economies to increase productivity in manufacturing and service delivery, contribute to improvements in health and education, and help deliver more equitable distribution of national wealth,” the report states. Mthuli Ncube, chief economist at the African Development Bank, said that sustained high economic growth “often occurs in an environment where there is a meaningful infrastructure development. “It is therefore imperative that planning for both national and regional infrastructure projects is coupled with the requisite legal and regulatory framework that will allow for increased involvement of the private sector in infrastructure development on a public-private partnerships model,” Ncube said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

Keynote address by Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa at the 2015 EY Strategic Growth Forum on Africa

first_imgJohanneburg, 3 November, 2015 – At the 2015 EY Strategic Growth Forum on Africa, South Africa’s deputy president Cyril Ramaphosa said that if companies want to expand into Africa, they would need to understand that the continent is diverse and that growth strategies need to be tailored according to each country’s needs.South African deputy president, Cyril RamaphosaProgramme Director,EY Chief Executive Officer Ajen Sita,Ladies and Gentlemen,Thank you for inviting me to officially open the EY Strategic Growth Forum, a valuable platform for engagement on the challenges and opportunities in Africa.This Forum is an acknowledgement that Africa’s growth and development narrative is changing.It is an acknowledgment that while we appreciate many of the difficulties, we have not sufficiently explored the possibilities.The programme for this Forum seeks to look beyond conventional wisdom. You will most probably during the course of this conference be looking at what I regard as mega-trends that are unfolding and influencing a great deal of things that are happening in the world.The programme for this Forum is therefore quite exciting.It is a fresh approach that is reflective, evidence-based and forward-looking.It acknowledges that human progress depends on social interactions, better coordination of responses and shared responsibility.It is an approach that allows us all to take ownership of our common future.Ladies and Gentlemen,To do business well in Africa today requires more than traditional economic analysis.It requires an understanding that Africa is a very diverse continent, with a vast array of different social structures, political systems, economies, products and markets.For this reason, there is no single African growth story.And no business that seeks to operate across the continent can pursue a single African growth strategy.Africa is simply too large and too diverse.Yet, despite all this variety, most African economies share common features.Most are reliant on the extraction and export of raw materials.Most are constrained by inadequate infrastructure, low skills levels and limited industrial capacity.This exposes many African economies to fluctuations in commodity prices and depressed global demand.The lack of industrial capacity means that many African countries are unable to extract sufficient value from their natural resources.They are not able to realise the potential benefits for job creation, improved export earnings and inclusive growth.That is the part of the African story we know well.But the African story is changing.Africa’s future depends not so much on the rise of commodity prices but on the expansion and development of its human capital.A continent of over a billion people, Africa is said to have the fastest-growing middle class in the world.Opportunities that were not available a mere generation ago, are now within reach of millions more people.More Africans are educated, more are employed, more own assets.Africa has a young and rapidly expanding workforce.Over the next few decades, as many other countries grapple with the challenges of an ageing workforce, Africa has the potential to become the most vibrant, innovative and productive region in the world.But to achieve this potential, African countries – individually and collectively – need to pursue deliberate political, social and economic measures.Many of these measures are described in the African Union’s Agenda 2063.And many of them are being implemented.Even as many economies still rely on commodity exports, there is significant investment in other sectors.The growth in retail banking, telecommunications, information technology, niche and finished goods has been remarkable.African economies are becoming more diverse, more industrialised and more innovative.Today a large proportion of transfers in foreign currency are not carried out through the international banks, but through mobile money remittances from the African diaspora.Several African airlines, led by the likes of Kenya Airways and Ethiopian Airlines, are becoming more commercial viable, investing in new aircraft, opening up new routes and increasing intra-Africa commerce and trade.In countries like Nigeria and Kenya, even with limited internet connectivity, innovative technological solutions are improving the lives of rural communities.Cellphone-based technologies are revolutionising the practice of medicine.Thanks to apps being developed on this continent, a health worker at a rural clinic can refer an issue for specialist diagnosis, in real time, by simply taking a cellphone photo of a patient’s eye.African economies have both the potential and ability to leapfrog advanced economies in developing technologies suitable for local conditions and needs.Economic change in Africa is taking place alongside political change.Governments are increasingly concerned with need for stability as a precondition for economic growth and social development.African countries are more united than ever before in promoting good governance, regional integration and multilateralism.Through our work in the African Union we are steadily establishing an integrated community that values accountability, good governance and transparency.Through a strong peer review mechanism we are seeing less conflict.With some notable exceptions, changes in government take place through the ballot box and not through the barrel of a gun.More than ever Africa is resolving its challenges through mediation, peace and dialogue.African countries are working hard to transform their economies.Governments are supporting programmes that promote manufacturing and competitiveness.They are encouraging new growth opportunities by investing in economic and social infrastructure.Importantly, African countries are collaborating on cross-border infrastructure projects that foster greater integration and trade.Many of these fall under the auspices of the Presidential Infrastructure Championing Initiative headed by President Jacob Zuma.This initiative is providing political leadership to projects such as the trans-Saharan highway between Algeria and Nigeria, the Grand Inga Dam in the DRC, and the North-South Corridor in Southern Africa.At a national level – in South Africa – we are undertaking a massive infrastructure investment programme overseen by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission.It is improving the capacity of our economy through better roads, ports, railways, electricity generation capacity and water infrastructure.It is improving people’s lives through new hospitals, clinics, schools and bus rapid transit systems.It is part of a broader economic strategy that seeks to grow the economy by increasing investment in productive economic sectors like manufacturing, agriculture.Central to the economic future of our country is the development of the skills of its people.Nowhere has the impact of apartheid been more keenly felt than in education.By depriving generations of black South Africans of a decent education, the apartheid government sought to deny them and their descendants a prosperous future.We have allocated R640 billion to basic education over the next three years. Much of this will go to improving school infrastructure, ensuring all learners receive suitable learning materials, and improving teacher training.We have significantly expanded access to higher education, and have increased the funding available to poor students through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS).The amount disbursed annually by NSFAS has grown by approximately 270% since 2008, and is budgeted to grow even further in the next few years.But what has been made very clear by events over the last few weeks is that the funding of higher education remains a critical problem.We need to ensure that no-one is excluded from higher education because of an inability to pay.At the same time, we need to find funding mechanisms that are sustainable and ensure a high quality of education.We should therefore welcome the decision that the Presidential task team established to look at funding higher education will now be broadened to look at other issues of transformation in the sector.This is a matter of great urgency and great consequence.No country has managed to achieve what we are seeking to achieve without affordable, accessible, quality higher education.Through their actions, the students of South Africa have, quite correctly, underlined this critical imperative.As a country, we must now move with speed and purpose to address these fundamental issues of access, transformation and quality outcomes.Ladies and Gentlemen, there are many ways to describe Africa’s recent progress and the expectations that many have of its imminent economic and social emergence.During the course of this Forum we can expect that these descriptions will be scrutinised and enriched and enhanced.I would now like to turn to what I referred to in my opening remarks as mega-trends that business needs to address and pay attention to.EY has produced a report setting out five mega trends, to which I have added my own five.  The 10 trends are:1. Shared value;2. Regional integration;3. Infrastructure development;4. Entrepreneurship;5. Partnership;6. The level of consciousness of the people of the world is rising; people are becoming more discerning and are not prepared to accept shoddy service;7. Growth of the middle class, and on the African continent in particular;8. People’s demand for good governance;9. Innovation, particularly the grasp of technology in Africa10. Hope for the future: people are more hopeful about the future; (even) when they protest, they are doing so to secure a better future.I would like to conclude with what I consider to be one of the most compelling accounts of what we are witnessing in Africa today.It was written over a century ago by Pixley ka Isaka Seme.He said:“The brighter day is rising upon Africa. Already I seem to see her chains dissolved, her desert plains red with harvest, her Abyssinia and her Zululand the seats of science and religion, reflecting the glory of the rising sun from the spires of their churches and universities.“Her Congo and her Gambia whitened with commerce, her crowded cities sending forth the hum of business, and all her sons employed in advancing the victories of peace-greater and more abiding than the spoils of war.“Yes, the regeneration of Africa belongs to this new and powerful period!”I thank you.last_img read more

It’s time to pay your Tekkie Tax

first_imgSlide on your favourite pair of tekkies, pay your Tekkie Tax and support a good cause; it’s never been easier to do the right thing (Image: Tekkie Tax)It will soon be time to don your tekkies for a good cause; the annual Tekkie Tax fundraising campaign falls on 30 May for 2014 and promises to be as popular as it was in 2013, its inaugural year.For the Average Joe, Tekkie Tax is a simple way to support a good cause; buy a Tekkie Tax sticker for just R10, stick it on your lapel and sport your tekkies on the day to show you care about making South Africa a better place. This year, Tekkie Tax participants can also grab a pair of Tekkie tags, specially designed shoelaces, for R30, and receive a smaller sticker for a cellphone or wallet with the larger sticker.Each sticker is designed to represent a charity sector; animals, basic family care, children, disability, and education, and donations go to a charity in the sector you would prefer to support.HOW DOES TEKKIE TAX BENEFIT CHARITIES?Running a fundraising campaign is expensive; organisations need to pay staff, hire venues and cover administration costs. Joining the Tekkie Tax campaign cuts down on labour and administrative costs, and channels monies received to where they are needed the most; the charities’ beneficiaries. Tekkie Tax is also managed so that no single organisation involved has access to the funds collected; instead the Legacy Through Charity Trust manages the campaign, ensuring it is audited and that all monies are distributed equitably.Currently Tekkie Tax represents some 15 national welfare organisations and a further 1 000 non-governmental organisations across the country. Last year the campaign raised R2.4-million for the 183 participating organisations, and sold more than 700 000 stickers.GET INVOLVEDTo buy your Tekkie Tax stickers and shoelaces, make a donation, or learn more about the campaign, visit www.tekkietax.co.za, email [email protected], call the office on +27 (0) 12 663 8181 or send a fax to +27 (0)12 663 8188.last_img read more

Remembering Lundi, South African gospel star, 1979-2017

first_imgGospel singer Lundi Tyamara has died at the age of 38. Fans, friends and family have paid tribute to one of South Africa’s most popular singers.Lundi Tyamara was one of the biggest selling gospel artists in South Africa, selling over 3 million albums. Tyamara died, aged 38, on 27 January 2017. (Image: Gallo Music)CD AndersonLundi Tyamara’s former producer, Tshepo Nzimande, described the singer in an interview with eNCA news channel as a “go-getter”. Tyamara died at Edenvale Hospital in the early hours of 27 January 2017, following a battle with TB.“Lundi put up a gallant fight against his illness, but God’s will prevailed. We ask that his fans, supporters and followers join us in celebrating his life,” said Anele Hlazo, a family friend.Tyamara had a long music career, starting out as a back-up singer for fellow gospel singer Rebecca Malope when he was still a teenager.He released his debut album Mphefumlo Wami in 1998. It was an instant success, selling almost 400,000 copies. Over the course of his career Tyamara released more than 20 albums and won numerous South African Music and Kora All Africa Music awards.Nzimande said that Tyamara had a God-given talent, with a powerful stage presence that found audiences with both young and old. Despite some controversy during his career, including drug and money problems, returning to music and his faith always gave him his greatest pleasure.Tyamara was aware of the second chance he had at rebuilding his music career over the last few years. In an interview with Entertainment Online website in 2016, he said: “I’m lucky. It’s not easy after all the bad things I have done like the drugs and the alcohol. But my fans still love me. That shows that God has sent me to do this.”Commenting briefly to eNCA on his passing, Malope said she was in shock but would always have fond and special memories of Tyamara.Among the many messages, Arts and Culture Minister Nathi Mthethwa extended his condolences to Tyamara’s family and fans.Tyamara is survived by two sisters and a brother; his mother died in 2006, followed by his stepfather shortly thereafter.Despite his many hardships, Tyamara’s story was one of great triumph and success. Following his death, he will always be remembered by his fans as a prince of South African gospel.Watch some of Lundi’s greatest hits below.Source: eNCA News and Entertainment Online.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

Award winners recognized at Ohio Pork Congress

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Ohio is fortunate to be home to many outstanding leaders who work selflessly to make a difference in the pork industry. At yesterday’s Ohio Pork Congress Luncheon some of those individuals were recognized for their service with the presentation of the Swine Manager of the Year, Ohio Pork Council Service, Pork Promoter of the Year, Friends of Ohio Pork and Ohio Pork Industry Excellence awards.Swine Manager of the Year Award: Nathan Isler, ProspectPresident Dave Shoup and Nathan Isler.Nathan oversees the sows and three full time employees in the sow barn for Isler Genetics.“Commercially raising hogs for market is the way we are going and our future as I see it today,” Nathan said. “The vast majority of our hogs go to market, but we also sell breeding stock, show pigs, and pigs for medical research. We sell commercial semen as well. We also have three contract barns. Through the progression of things we are 70% pure York sows. We are essentially a commercial producer but we have our hands in everything.”Service Award: Carl Link, Ft. RecoveryPresident Dave Shoup and Carl Link The OPC Service Award recognizes an individual who demonstrates outstanding commitment and contribution to the pork industry. Carl Link has served the Ohio Pork Industry at the local, state and national levels, including service on the 15-member National Pork Board. Link is a Production Manager at Cooper Farms.  Friend of Ohio Pork Award: Dr. Tony Forshey, Ohio State Veterinarian Dr. Forshey and Dave Shoup, OPC presidentThis year, the Friend of Ohio Pork Industry award was presented to Dr. Forshey for his extensive efforts protection Ohio’s hogs and making a substantial impact on the Ohio pork industry. Pork Promoter of the Year Award: Hord Family Farms, BucyrusOPC president Dave Shoup presents the award to Duane, Inez, Phil, Becca, Janel and Pat Hord.Each year, an individual or organization is recognized for their efforts to promote pork and the pork industry. The Pork Promoter of the Year Award is sponsored by Ohio’s Country Journal.The Hord family’s farming roots date to 1905 when Guy L. Hord purchased a tract of land that remains a part of the Hord Family heritage. Today Hord Family Farms continues to utilize the latest technologies and animal husbandry practices, and are dedicated to ensuring production of quality grain and protein products that you’d feel comfortable feeding your family. The Hord family participates in virtual field trips and on-farm tours, as well as supporting the state fair pork stand with volunteers.In addition to their farming operation, the Hord family developed Hord Cares to give back to the communities they live and work in. Hord Cares is supported by the Hord family, as well as their team members by holding several fundraising efforts year-round.The Pork Industry Excellence Award: Rick Fogle, Marion Rick Fogle is pictured with his wife Joann, and their daughters.The Pork Industry Excellence Award is the highest form of recognition presented by the Ohio Pork Council. This award recognizes an individual in Ohio for their unparalleled contributions to our industry. Rick Fogle and his Isla Grande Farms was recognized for promoting pork and the swine industry on a local, state and national level. The award is given by the Ohio Pork Council and is sponsored by Elanco.last_img read more

Many Huffington Post Readers Hate Site’s New Facebook-Powered Recommendation Engine

first_imgWhy Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… Tags:#Recommendation Engines#web Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting marshall kirkpatrickcenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… The giant online publisher and aggregator Huffington Post began experimenting with a new content recommendation engine today, powered by Facebook and built by AdaptiveSemantics, the startup the company acquired last June. The feature uses the “Liked” Pages and shared articles of logged-in Facebook users who visit the Post to recommend recent content from across its wide swath of articles. It looks like a good and relatively simple feature. Surprisingly, HuffPo readers responding in comments on the announcement absolutely hate it!The feature sounds simple, but is a great example of the power of Facebook: the social network is not just a tool for publishers to push content onto, to increase distribution and pageviews, Facebook Connect is also a form of data portability that allows 3rd party websites to offer personalized content to their visitors. Many sites have exposed content that a Facebook user’s friends have shared, but this leveraging of the structured individual interest data is far less common.Could objections to using this data be rooted in the ongoing lack of clarity around Facebook’s privacy settings? Or did the company just shoot itself in the foot so badly 12 months ago when it made drastic privacy policy changes that people still distrust it today?The Down Side Reader comments range from confusion about the feature to distrust of anything associated with Facebook (“I don’t have one of those,” several people have said) to distrust of recommendations to concern about self-reenforcing political perspectives. “Great,” one frustrated comment read, “put your readers to work for you, is it not enough that we have to deal with your advertisements.” Unbelievable!Another: “If it involves Facebook, you can count me out. 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more