Surprise Soulless Sex Robots Offer No Human Health Benefits

first_img Robot Dog Astro Can Sit, Lie Down, and Save LivesYou Can’t Squish This Cockroach-Inspired Robot Stay on target Sex, like milk, does a body good: it lowers blood pressure, burns calories, lessens pain, improves sleep, and eases stress.Unfortunately for well-heeled loners, though, there is no evidence (yet) to suggest sex robots—anthropomorphic devices with customizable genitalia—can cure physical, mental, or social aches.A new report published this week in the journal BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health exposes a lack of clinical research data on sexbots—unsurprising given their recent rise to fame.AdChoices广告But limited availability and excessive price tags haven’t curbed curiosity.“We became aware that doctors are being asked for their professional opinions on sex dolls and robots,” study co-author Chantal Cox-George, a doctor at St. George’s University Hospitals, told The Washington Post.Some advocates defend the cyborgs as promoting safer sex: Imagine a red-light district full of robotic prostitutes made of bacteria-resistant fiber, and flushed for human fluids after use.Sounds … gross. Yet optimistic.“It is speculative whether the development of a sexbot marketplace will lead to lesser risk of violence and infections, or drive further exploitation of human sex workers,” the research paper said.Perhaps they can provide therapeutic value, allowing folks to practice without pressure. Or, more likely, a racy robot may further isolate someone with sexual dysfunction, or alienate couples already struggling in the bedroom.Cox-George and co-author Susan Bewley, an obstetrician at King’s College London, also examine sexbots’ potential to treat pedophiles and sex offenders (they “strongly caution against” it), as well as whether these tailor-made, idealized machines will change societal norms.“There are worries about blurred boundaries to consent and permission for enacted violence when sexbot ‘personalities’ can be selected that simulate non-consensual sex—that is, rape,” the pair wrote.For now, Cox-George and Bewley urge medical practitioners to follow the “precautionary principle”—i.e. avoid the clinical use of sexbots until their benefits have been empirically proven.“There is a social responsibility to protect the public from harm, unless findings emerge to show no harm,” Cox-George said.Get a behind-the-scenes look at how sex robots are made in this photo essay by brave European Pressphoto Agency photographer Aleksandar Plavevski.Let us know what you like about Geek by taking our survey.last_img read more